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Most baller house in your area...aerial or street view shots - Page 3

post #31 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
It's OK. Not great in context. I'm not surprised everybody here hates it, since the tast in architecture in sf is awful. Nothing worse than liberals with bad taste.

agreed, his style is more suited to LA



post #32 of 124
The SF federal building has all kinds of air flow and lighting problems. It's exactly what you'd expect from an architect promulgating his vision of the future.
Quote:
The idea of “green” buildings is a terrific marketing concept. In San Francisco, it has helped grease the political roadway for massive, view-blocking luxury condominiums, implying that building these structures is more environmentally sustaining than leaving land vacant. Few seem to care whether green buildings can be a nightmare for those having to work inside high-rise structures lacking heat or air conditioning. The new Thomas Mayne designed Federal Building at 7th and Mission Streets in San Francisco is a case in point. Lauded by the New York Times as a building that “may one day be remembered as the crowning achievement of the General Services Administration’s Design Excellence program,” what some believe is the greenest federal building in the nation’s history also likely has the worst work environment. While architectural describe the building’s “sense of airiness” as “magical,” employees view working in this heat and air-conditioning free building with the wavy concrete floors and ceilings as a nightmare. Green but Cold Thomas Mayne’s new George H.W. Bush Federal Building now looms over midtown San Francisco. While people have sharply divergent reactions to its unique exterior design -- I happen to like it -- the verdict on the structure’s function as a office space for federal employees is nearly unanimous: it is a disaster. Not that architectural critics care. Bedazzled by unusual design features and its focus on energy conservation, reviews of Mayne’s latest work seem to ignore whether it fulfills its functional role as a federal office building. Based on what I have been told, it clearly does not. The first fact about the building that may cause surprise is its lack of air conditioning or heat. According to Mayne, “a bike rack and air conditioning get you the same point. I’d much rather see BTU and CO2 requirements and let the professional community solve the problem.” I apparently lack sufficient understanding of green technology, as it does not seem that a bike rack would “get you to the same point” in terms of keeping workers cool. In the real world on the 15th floor of the Federal Building, workers seek to relieve the heat by opening windows, which not only sends papers flying, but, depending on their proximity to the opening, makes creating a stable temperature for all workers near impossible. When I spoke with a Labor Department worker at the building (who noted that she is encountering the type of bad work conditions that her agency is supposed to enforce against), she confirmed what might have been an urban legend: that some employees must use umbrellas to keep the sun out of their cubicles. The lack of internal climate controls has left some workers too cold and others too hot. A happy medium has proved elusive. And while the managers’ offices do have heat and air conditioning -- a two-tiered approach fitting in a building named for Bush -- the “green” design apparently has messed with the effectiveness of these systems, leaving these top staff as physically uncomfortable as the line workers. Dysfunctional Elevators According to my source, architect Mayne has stated that federal office workers do not get enough exercise. To address this, he installed elevators in the building that only stop at every third floor. This requires employees to walk up or down one or two flights of metal stairs. Persons with physical disabilities who cannot use stairs can use a separate elevator that stops at every floor. The foreseeable result is that employees seeking to avoid stairs use the disabled access elevator, leaving this car crammed with people and making the ride to the top extremely slow. I am told that when the freight elevator is out of service, deliveries must use the disabled access elevator. It seems only a matter of time until a disabled worker sues the General Services Administration for providing inadequate disabled elevator access in the building. Missing Cafeteria Mayne’s desire to get workers walking may have impacted his decision to locate the employee cafeteria across the street from the building. Employees are not happy about having to leave the building just to get a sandwich, and were allegedly told that the building would include an on-site café. But as is clear with every aspect of this testament to green buildings, this project was more a science experiment than a place designed to enhance worker productivity. No LEED Approval Green building advocates will no doubt argue that the Federal Building is a bad example, as it failed to secure LEED approval. According to its website, The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™ encourages and accelerates global adoption of sustainable green building and development practices through the creation and implementation of universally understood and accepted tools and performance criteria. Mayne noted that "I wasn't arrogant, but I was confident — I just assumed we had the platinum rating. All of a sudden we went through LEED and it wasn't working." But the project’s failure to satisfy LEED’s scoring system is not the problem. Rather, it is that the federal government spent millions over budget to create a building that does not provide a minimally satisfactory work environment. And the project’s huge cost overruns and functional inadequacies have apparently been ignored solely due to excitement over its “Green” stature.
post #33 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysc View Post
Near my family house/the house I grew up in rather than where I live most of the time now



This house is very defensible. An important consideration if those damned Celts ever decide to invade again.
post #34 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
The SF federal building has all kinds of air flow and lighting problems. It's exactly what you'd expect from an architect promulgating his vision of the future.
i've read that article before. the writing is atrocious and they take some stuff he said out of context. no idea as to whether the claims about the buildings shortcomings are true or not. i find the part about forcing random employees to climb steps by having the elevators stop only at third floors unlikely, but maybe i'm wrong.
post #35 of 124
Too many to list.

post #36 of 124
I heard it also smells really bad inside because they put the trash closets in the halls and stair wells where there is no airflow.
post #37 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
I heard it also smells really bad inside because they put the trash closets in the halls and stair wells where there is no airflow.
this sounds more likely. architects often seem not to consider those that actually will have to inhabit their structures. i take it you're not a Mayne fan? i figured you'd be into his constant criticism of LEED rating. i guess you could be and still dislike his buildings.
post #38 of 124
Sometimes architects fetishize their novel ideas to the point where they lose the critical integrity needed to know when to scrap them. That building is a good example. Another is Zaha Hadid's Vitra fire station, which couldn't even fit the necessary fire trucks and had to be turned into a museum.
post #39 of 124
but the criticism of them is often twisted and exaggerated, just as the personalities and actions of fine artists often are. for example,
Quote:
The building functioned as a firehouse until the fire district lines were re-drawn and the Vitra complex was finally covered by a nearby fire department. This rendered the building partially obsolete, and it was for this reason (and not the rumored error on Hadid's part of not allowing enough room in the building to house fire trucks) that the building is now used by Vitra as a showplace for part of its permanent collection of chairs.
post #40 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Sometimes architects fetishize their novel ideas to the point where they lose the critical integrity needed to know when to scrap them.

That coupled with having young, inexperienced, sometimes sycophantic staff; incompetent consultants; and incapable owner reps.
post #41 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post
but the criticism of them is often twisted and exaggerated, just as the personalities and actions of fine artists often are. for example,

I'm wondering where that came from. I've heard from numerous lectures and textbooks about the practical inadequacy of the design.
post #42 of 124
First few pages here are pretty "baller." All for sale, too! http://streeteasy.com/nyc/sales/nyc/
post #43 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
I'm wondering where that came from. I've heard from numerous lectures and textbooks about the practical inadequacy of the design.

first site that came up when i googled it, and it fit the point i wanted to make

where is it referenced the way you describe? would be interested to read texts on that subject with examples.
post #44 of 124
wow, the most baller private home in my area is comparatively peasant status.
Quote:
This mansion is located at 3247 Seven Eagles Road in Charlotte, NC. It is situated on 8.5 acres of lush property and is located on the Quail Hollow Country Club. The Wachovia PGA Tour Event is played here. The 6 bedroom, 7.5 bathroom home has a total of 23,466 square feet of living space with 17,717 of that being heated. The owner is Cameron Harris, whose grandfather Cameron Morrison was the former governor of North Carolina. One of the coolest features of this house is that large dome located in the center of the home. Here’s a little tid bit. Cameron bought the first Maybach delivered to the U.S.
http://homesoftherich.net/2009/05/on...rlotte-nc.html the Duke Mansion is in my zip code, but is a bed & breakfast. http://www.zillow.com/homes/400-Herm...rlotte,-nc_rb/
post #45 of 124
When I used to live in Boca, the baller mansions are located here:

http://www.lelacrealty.com/

http://www.bocaexecutiverealty.com/r...ton/Le_Lac.php
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