or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU (2nd gen Core)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU (2nd gen Core) - Page 3

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post
If you're going to get the 60GB OCZ SSD, be careful:

http://www.storagereview.com/ocz_ver...czssd22vtxe60g

Basically, they switched to 25nm parts without changing any external labeling, and the new drives are significantly slower (because there are fewer flash chips used in parallel) and are less durable (because of its 25nm process geometry). The presence of a Sandforce controller does not guarantee top performance.

The 120GB version appears to still use the older, larger flash chips.

Having said that, both drives are still way, way faster than any spinning disk drive.

--Andre

That is shady.

*edit*
Just wanted to add this .gif showing the difference between PHYSX enabled games and GPU's and those without. Something to take into consideration if you're into all that "eye candy" or just want absolute performance for $.
post #32 of 37
What exactly am I looking at there?
post #33 of 37
Ugh, I hate this seemingly interminable wait for the fixed P67 motherboards.

I do have a few questions about SSD. I've noticed a lot of poeple complaining about their reliability. Now, many normal HDs have high failure rates as well, but I was wondering if SSD are generally more reliable or not.

Also, I've figured that I can only afford a 120 GB SSD (~$200) (plus a 2 tb normal HD). A 120 GB SSD would fill up pretty quickly with the OS and just a few games. Are people generally buying the larger cards? (which are quite expensive)
post #34 of 37
Quote:
I do have a few questions about SSD. I've noticed a lot of poeple complaining about their reliability. Now, many normal HDs have high failure rates as well, but I was wondering if SSD are generally more reliable or not.
The studies I've seen show that SSDs have poor long-term write capability, but this was at their inception. If you're not constantly writing over a sector, your SSD should be fine. As far as lemons go... if you buy cheap expect it to suck, as is the case with most computing things.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleekblackroadster View Post
once the revised p67 boards ship i'm building a computer to replace a pentium 4 2.6c rig i built in 2003.

asus p6p67 pro
intel 2600k
intel x25-m 120gb
sapphire radeon 6950 2gb
corsair vengeance c9 2x4gb

i expect to be blown away.

of course there is better on the horizon. amd has an unknown quantity called bulldozer coming soon and intels own sandy bridge-e chips on the 2011 socket which will be higher end and feature 6 and 8 core cpus.

what is this pentium 4 you speak of?
post #36 of 37
Anyone know where I can buy one of the old P67 motherboards? I just won't use the affected SATA ports. I've been looking all over and cant find anything (except for one store in England with the shipping around $50)
post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post
The studies I've seen show that SSDs have poor long-term write capability, but this was at their inception. If you're not constantly writing over a sector, your SSD should be fine. As far as lemons go... if you buy cheap expect it to suck, as is the case with most computing things.

This. A lot of the newer ones don't give you all the storage capability to help mitigate the wear and tear. Wear leveling they call it.

I just got 2 64gb Sandforce 1222 units for $160 total. Will be putting them in RAID 0 tonight or tomorrow.

Put the same drive in my brother's machine for his boot drive. Ridiculously fast by itself. Really looking forward to having two of them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Intel's Sandy Bridge CPU (2nd gen Core)