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The Teacher Thread - Page 35

post #511 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post

I find similar routines throughout asia. Although not so much of the running to martial music and more studying.

Communist country. Also all new students have to do a week's basic military training, mainly drill and parade. Every Monday morning, all students, teachers and staff have to stand to attention for flag raising, national anthem(March of the Volunteers) and school song.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post

It's no wonder why China and India and other Asian countries are becoming powerhouses, and the US and Europe are decaying.

It was a culture shock for me when I first started working here.

My old secondary school in the UK, sold its sports facilities and grounds for housing development. My school here has Olympic quality track and field facilities.
post #512 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

You do know I'm in Mainland China?
OK this might freak you out:
School day starts at 05.30 with wakeup call, 06.00 running to martial music and whistles(exercise), 6.30 breakfast, 7.30 first lesson, 10.00 more running to martial music, 10.30 lessons, 12.00 lunch then break, 14.40 lessons, 16.10 running to martial music, 16.30 lessons, sports or drill, 18.00 dinner, 19.00 self study or homework in classrooms, 21.30 end of self study, 22.00 lights out. Six days a week Monday to Saturday. Sunday is day-off. It is a boarding school.

I find similar routines throughout asia. Although not so much of the running to martial music and more studying. It's no wonder why China and India and other Asian countries are becoming powerhouses, and the US and Europe are decaying.

...? I don't think this is the reason they're becoming powerhouses.

Yeah they might not be fat (wow high bar there) but you'll quickly notice most of them aren't capable of simple thought.
post #513 of 564

Hey MikeDT,

 

How easy is it to find a job teaching English in Outer Mongolia? I'm planning on doing so next year when I get out of college (I would already be except that all the schools I looked at had an age requirement.) Do any rural schools need English teachers, or is there only a demand in bigger cities?

 

And Eason is correct, the Chinese can't think. When I was traveling around in Gansu Province last summer, I eventually gave up on trying to make sense of things. You'll go insane trying to find reasons because there aren't any. You gotta go with the flow. If that means waking up at 5AM every morning because some asshole cruises around town blaring his horn, then so be it. 

 

PS: Reading through some of your posts inspired me to register an account here, MikeDT. :)

post #514 of 564
By outer mongolia you mean real Mongolia, non-Chinese occupied Mongolia? Probably quite easy.
post #515 of 564

Aaaagh, I meant inner Mongolia. 

post #516 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by StylishSteve View Post

Aaaagh, I meant inner Mongolia. 

Yes it is Inner Mongolia. Foreign teachers are often required, but it's usually in Hohhot. AFAIK I'm the only westerner in this city, never seen another. Maybe it's the cold winters puts them off, they want to stay in the warmer areas.

I did have some friends come to visit during the summer, so I wasn't the only foreigner here for three days.
263
...welcome to my house.

It's true Mainland Chinese aren't really trained to think, can't have that it would be too dangerous. They're trained to obey, study hard, pass exams and to be good at sports. Thing is living in various areas of China for a few years, kind of warps the mind into believing anything is possible and nothing really comes as a surprise.

Schools can be so variable, from absolute poverty stricken shit pits, where they're lucky just to have desks and a blackboard. The middle school I'm currently at, where basically money is no object and seems to have best of everything. Same for all govt. schools in Xilinhot. Could have something to do with been an Autonomous Region('Chinese occupied Mongolia' as Eason puts it). Xilin Gol Vocational College has a beautiful campus that was built only three years ago. Next year the college is moving to an even better new campus.

Welcome to SF Steve, happy you like my posts. smile.gif

BTW I've just been reading 'World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War'

"There was still one last duty to perform. The Politburo, those hated old men who had caused so much misery already, were still holed up in their leadership bunker in Xilinhot, still controlling at least half of our country’s dwindling ground forces. They would never surrender, everyone knew this; they would keep their mad hold on power, squandering what was left of our military. If the civil war dragged on any longer, the only beings left in China would be the living dead."
Edited by MikeDT - 11/18/11 at 8:11am
post #517 of 564
Any advantages gained from getting a Master's degree?

I have always thought teaching high school or even middle school English would be fun, probably because in my expereince English classes were the most enjoyable for me and my teachers there where best at teaching us things that go beyond the scope of traditional middle school curriculum if you will.

Anyway, I am fully aware of the dire straits teachers and the education system is experiencing, but I am curious as to whether a Master's degree helps in any stage of the career: initial hiring process, teacher training, etc.

I like school, that is probably my problem. I enjoy reading about things and all that stuff. So going back to school wouldn't bother me much. What I wonder if there is an extra incentive for a prospective teacher.
post #518 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

Any advantages gained from getting a Master's degree?
I have always thought teaching high school or even middle school English would be fun, probably because in my expereince English classes were the most enjoyable for me and my teachers there where best at teaching us things that go beyond the scope of traditional middle school curriculum if you will.
Anyway, I am fully aware of the dire straits teachers and the education system is experiencing, but I am curious as to whether a Master's degree helps in any stage of the career: initial hiring process, teacher training, etc.
I like school, that is probably my problem. I enjoy reading about things and all that stuff. So going back to school wouldn't bother me much. What I wonder if there is an extra incentive for a prospective teacher.

Well hello,

I do not know how this works in other states. So I'll base my comments on personal experience. In my state a Master of Arts Degree is required within a few years after you begin teaching. So you pretty much need a master's degree to be a teacher.

Also, you need some degree or other in education. If you do not have a bachelor's in education, you need a masters in education or in teaching. But if you have a BS in education, than your masters can be in your subject area. A BA in English and a MA English is worthless unless your certified

There are fast certification routes, but they are suspect in the eyes of many.

In conclusion, if you want to be a teacher, find out what you need to teach in the states you want to teach in. If you do not have an bachelors degree in education (I presume you don't) an MAT (Master of Arts in Teaching) will go a lot further than an MA in English.
post #519 of 564
Also,

Teaching high school English is a lot of fun.

It is also wildly stressful if you care about people. It's tough to worry about and help improve the future of 120 kids and then find time to relax on the weekends.
post #520 of 564
I dunno, I'm helping to improve the future of 5,000 kids and still find time to relax at weekends. smile.gif
post #521 of 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

I dunno, I'm helping to improve the future of 5,000 kids and still find time to relax at weekends. smile.gif

Tell me how it's done!
post #522 of 564
Does anyone have a problem with students not having pens, pencils, or paper? Its a huge distraction/time waste with students and kids I tutor.
I think I am going to buy a bulk lot of school supplies and give it to students who come to class unprepared. Where would be the cheapest place to pick up a bulk lot of pens and pencils?
post #523 of 564
dollar store
dollarama.....etc is the best place for supplies

As for stray pens/pencils, I pick em up in the hallways and keep em in a mug
post #524 of 564
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

School's policy, as of last year. Gives them an incentive not to be late for lessons. The corridors are cold and the classrooms are nice and warm. Students are very rarely late for lessons. The school itself is very strong on student discipline anyway.
They don't do detentions here, as it's not really productive and wastes everyone's time. Punishments usually involve extra cleaning duties instead of doing sports, or something they might like. Anyone caught smoking is fined. No corporal punishment either.

In NYC that is considered corporal punishment.

As far as dealing with attendance problems, our admins hound the parents of kids who are habitually late/absent. Sometime it works, sometimes it doesn't. They also just started awarding pizza/cookie/icecream parties to classes who are top 3 in school wide attendance. I suppose you can offer some kind of reward for kids who are 100%.
post #525 of 564
@NYR

What do you think about the publicly disclosed teacher ratings? good or bad?
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