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The Teacher Thread - Page 32

post #466 of 563
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post
Occasionally have those experiences, but fix them quick depending on the class. Grade 8s or 9s?

Mostly high school students(14-18).
post #467 of 563
alright, i've been doing the bohemian thing for the last few years, and am considering getting into teaching high school. i have some experience teaching at college level, but have only an m.a. in the humanities, so i can't really do anything serious there. here's the thing: i really don't want to go back to college and get a teaching degree, so i've been looking into programs like Teach for America, i believe it's called. this allows you to acquire your teaching certification while working in a lower-class school district for a year. i believe there are similar programs in new york city. anyway, has anyone here gone this route? or heard anything about it? i'm aware that it could be a nightmare, but woudl appreciate any opinions people may have.
post #468 of 563
Sancho--

I cannot speak much for teach for america. I was told a friend of a friend got beat up by her fourth grade class in Saint Louis. I also believe they like to hire students right out of college. I also believe it's a two year program.

But I can speak about going back to school: It's not that bad if you have a place to live and can go to a state school in-state. I bit the bullet and moved back home to get a one-year masters degree in education at a state university. Took two semesters of classes over the summer, then two normal semesters over the school year. I was reluctant too, having worked for a year, but I do not regret my decision. I have a job in September, moving to the beach, and don't have a whole bunch of new debt. Life is pretty good. I'm making 50% more than I was working at an office in Boston.

A route you may want to investigate is accelerated teacher certification. I know that in my state, Connecticut, teachers can be certified through a non-university program that takes several weeks over the summer. It's an intense amount of coursework in a short period of time and your student teaching takes place during summer school. The program usually takes only students with a masters degree in the subject area they plan to teach. As you have an MA and some teaching experience, this route might be a good one for you if it's available.
post #469 of 563
Would love to see how such a quick program like that could produce non-shitty teachers. Seems to be a "have it or you don't, so give us your money" deal.
post #470 of 563
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Would love to see how such a quick program like that could produce non-shitty teachers. Seems to be a "have it or you don't, so give us your money" deal.

...to the best of my knowledge that's generally how it works, unfortunately. I found that most of my learning how to teach took place during student teaching. The summer program requires 4 weeks. I had 12, and I didn't really feel to get the hang of things until about week 10. And some Masters programs or integrated bachelor-masters programs require two student teaching semesters. Nothing makes up for experience, I've found. Though that whole natural ability to speak in front of large groups and creativity to use various methods that reach different students can take you pretty far.

But I'll say that given the choice between an under-prepared teacher and no teacher, or an under-prepared teacher and a better prepared teacher who does not know their subject well enough to teach it, a school system can do worse than hire some one from an accelerated certification program. And many newly certified teachers, regardless of preparation, will have to spend some months as a long term or permanent sub before getting a full time position. A lot of growth can take place in that time.
post #471 of 563
Quote:
But I'll say that given the choice between an under-prepared teacher and no teacher, or an under-prepared teacher and a better prepared teacher who does not know their subject well enough to teach it, a school system can do worse than hire some one from an accelerated certification program.

True.
Quote:
And many newly certified teachers, regardless of preparation, will have to spend some months as a long term or permanent sub before getting a full time position. A lot of growth can take place in that time.

They say the wait time before landing a permanent gig - at least in my neck of the woods, is 3-5 yrs.
post #472 of 563
Same here- I wasn't aware things were so desperate in the US.
post #473 of 563
Well? How was the first week of school and how much better of a dresser are you than your principal?foo.gif
post #474 of 563
I've really enjoyed the extra cash made from tutoring high schoolers on the side. It's relatively easy to set up a website and start private tuition; I'd recommend it highly to anyone considering (or already) teaching.
post #475 of 563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Contingency Plan View Post

I've really enjoyed the extra cash made from tutoring high schoolers on the side. It's relatively easy to set up a website and start private tuition; I'd recommend it highly to anyone considering (or already) teaching.

+1
I gave up subbing all together. After gas I was making maybe a few dollars more than minimum wage.
I make as much tutoring as I do subbing in less than 1/4 the amount of time. The kids I tutor don't have guns, drugs, or any weapons. They don't threaten me, pee in trash cans or even in my coffee.nod[1].gif There parents pay for me to be there so they get straight to work. I feel I make a significant difference with these kids.
post #476 of 563
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6up View Post

They say the wait time before landing a permanent gig - at least in my neck of the woods, is 3-5 yrs.

They told me I would likely have to wait a good 3 years too. I was also told the only openings would likely come in a math or science class.
post #477 of 563
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

Well? How was the first week of school and how much better of a dresser are you than your principal?foo.gif

The first week of school went well. As a young teacher I find dressing well goes far to keep a bit of professional distance between you and the students, but also makes you seem a little more real, for lack of a better word. You look comfortable in your position, like you belong, and the kids appreciate that you appear to take your position seriously. Student attitude will often reflect teacher attitude, and appearance plays a role in that.
post #478 of 563
Sometimes kids think you're an asshole if you dress ''too'' well.
post #479 of 563
Yeah don't wear a suit to teach highschool in America, I'll tell you that.
post #480 of 563
I am yet to see anyone in a suit save the administrators. Which I am for. Teacher style is a fun thing to partake in. I imagine I'll get more regular use from my corduroy jacket or blue cotton blazer than most people who own the equivalent but work in a more formal setting. Simply tucking in a shirt goes far here.
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