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The Teacher Thread - Page 8

post #106 of 561
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
Wait, what? How does a student rarely use textbooks? What is balanced literacy and why are textbooks against that approach?

I'm an adult and I still buy and read textbooks to stay current!

LOL, thats what lots of us think! Well, the thoery is that a text book is written on one level, everyone gets the same text book. Modern educational philosophy says that students are on all different levels and text books write to the middle. They're too challenging for lower level readers, and not challenging enough for higher level learners. Then there's the whole idea of learning modality. Some kids are visual learners, other auditory. Honestly is all a binch of excuses as to why teachers aren't doing enough to teach the kids, and gives them excuses for not learning/working. Now that the NAPE standards are being unrolled, we're seeing a drastic change. While last year we were told to create different assessments for each learning level and modality, now, because the standardized tests are all higher level, we are told to give everyone the same test, even kids who speak NO ENGLISH.
post #107 of 561
It seems like the system is stacked against the kids. I'm curious, given the ability to do either, would you prefer to send your own children to school or home school them?
post #108 of 561
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
It seems like the system is stacked against the kids. I'm curious, given the ability to do either, would you prefer to send your own children to school or home school them?

They need the socialization, I think all kids do. I wouldn't home school them. I also would not send them to my school. Knowing all the teachers the way I do, there are some if my children had, I would be furious. Honestly, its something I don't want to think about (them going to school). We don't have the money to send them to the good prep schools around here, so its either Catholic school or Public. :/
post #109 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger View Post
They need the socialization, I think all kids do. I wouldn't home school them. I also would not send them to my school. Knowing all the teachers the way I do, there are some if my children had, I would be furious. Honestly, its something I don't want to think about (them going to school). We don't have the money to send them to the good prep schools around here, so its either Catholic school or Public. :/

You seem a tad misinformed about homeschooling. Oftentimes, people will actually join up in homeschooling (eg. your son and my son will have classes together because we're neighbors/friends/both interested). Depending on the person you hire to be the teacher, they sometimes offer group rates as well. Also, if you pay taxes, I don't believe any public school in your district can refuse your child access to afterschool programs (eg athletics, theater, etc.), though this may vary based on regions.
post #110 of 561
Public school raised kids are almost never well adjusted.
post #111 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post
Public school raised kids are almost never well adjusted.

That is a gross generalization.
post #112 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post
Public school raised kids are almost never well adjusted.
OOPS, read that wrong LOL
post #113 of 561
Oops, I meant home schooled!
post #114 of 561
see, my OP was me complaining about your generalization. then i edited. but i was pretty sure you meant home-schooling anyway.
post #115 of 561
Thought it was a dig at public school. Someone's been reading his John Taylor Gatto.
post #116 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post
Thought it was a dig at public school. Someone's been reading his John Taylor Gatto.
His essay "Against School" is worth reading.
post #117 of 561
I read his book on deschooling. It froths at the mouth with anger at system he taught in but doesn't offer any solid or tangible solutions. In fact, he was barely able to articulate his main thesis. There are much better ''anti-school'' people out there.
post #118 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post
I read his book on deschooling. It froths at the mouth with anger at system he taught in but doesn't offer any solid or tangible solutions. In fact, he was barely able to articulate his main thesis. There are much better ''anti-school'' people out there.
I haven't read any of his other work, so I can't really comment further, but from the essay I read he does offer some advice. Perhaps not entirely tangible, and without exactly describing the proper methods to go about doing so, but I tend to agree with some of his thoughts here:
Quote:
Now for the good news. Once you understand the logic behind modern schooling, its tricks and traps are fairly easy to avoid. School trains children to be employees and consumers; teach your own to be leaders and adventurers. School trains children to obey reflexively; teach your own to think critically and independently. Well-schooled kids have a low threshold for boredom; help your own to develop an inner life so that they'll never be bored. Urge them to take on the serious material, the grown-up material, in history, literature, philosophy, music, art, economics, theology - all the stuff schoolteachers know well enough to avoid. Challenge your kids with plenty of solitude so that they can learn to enjoy their own company, to conduct inner dialogues. Well-schooled people are conditioned to dread being alone, and they seek constant companionship through the TV, the computer, the cell phone, and through shallow friendships quickly acquired and quickly abandoned. Your children should have a more meaningful life, and they can.
post #119 of 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by pseudonym View Post
Sorry to throw things on the off-topic train here, but I just had a couple of questions. I've an undergrad business student, and I've been having mixed thoughts about careers. Teacher was on my list for quite a while, so any help would be gladly appreciated.

1.) Do you enjoy your job? (simple question, but I get a ton of mixed answers when asking my teachers)
2.) What parts do/don't you like about it? How do you deal with kids who don't exactly cooperate?
3.) What made you want to jump into the teaching field?

Thanks.

Sub Teacher Here

1. I make $54 a day watching 14-18 year olds spit on each other. I also have no chance at finding a permanent position. Despite this, I still enjoy teaching.

2.
Do- Watching students learn or at least improve in some way.

Don't- Kids who are lazy or violent. Parents who don't care. Administrators who don't care.

2 weeks ago I sent a sophomore to the principal for spitting. I looked out the window to make sure he was walking there, when I noticed he was hanging around a big trash can. He was peeing in it.
He later told the principal "The bathroom was too far away" and "Its your fault for not buying more bathrooms". He received a warning and was in my class the next day.

3. To change the world for the better.
post #120 of 561
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post
You seem a tad misinformed about homeschooling. Oftentimes, people will actually join up in homeschooling (eg. your son and my son will have classes together because we're neighbors/friends/both interested). Depending on the person you hire to be the teacher, they sometimes offer group rates as well. Also, if you pay taxes, I don't believe any public school in your district can refuse your child access to afterschool programs (eg athletics, theater, etc.), though this may vary based on regions.
I did not know that. I have taught kids who were home schooled before they came to my school. They weren't terribly maladjusted, but I still would want my kids to experience the interpersonal relationships of going to school. Even if kids could get together to hire ahomeschooler, I don't think they can fully achieve those, even with afterschool programs. Also, just to clarify my comments re: not wanting my children in my school: The reason I wouldn't send my kids to my school is because I KNOW THE INS AND OUTS. As an educator I know this is the case (that there are 'ins and outs') in all schools, and that in all schools there are "bad" teachers, I just know, or have my own ideas of who they are in mine. I also wouldn't want my kids to be in my school, because I'm there, and want my kid to feel free to be a kid, without he added pressure of a parent (in my case both) being on top of them all day everyday. If anything, I think I'm lucky to be in the school I'm in, because its one of the better ones (got an A on the report card) This was a response to a pretty kind PM asking me if I thought it was ok, as an easily identifiable person, to talk about my school with such candor. Thats another conversation worth having. I feel teachers should be free to criticize certain aspects of their job as long as it doesn't give away the identities of their children. A woman in PA is currently under the gun for a blogpost about her students, and plenty of NYC teachers are being fined for their opinions on social networking sites. In my mind thats bull, and while I recognize that there's a certain responsibilty, but the stripping of teachers of their right to speak is a little concerning to me, as an opinionated, and proud teacher.
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