or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › spoon tailor -hong kong bespoke operation in San Francisco
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

spoon tailor -hong kong bespoke operation in San Francisco - Page 9

post #121 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by ultramantaro View Post

If they make their suits in Shenzhen then 800 is yes, a lot.  If made in HK it would be a fair price, and made in US (assuming min wage labor) would be a deal.



I think their mast tailor make the cuts at the shop in SF and send it over to Hong Kong/China to get it sewn. I think they send their shirt orders straight to Hong Kong.

post #122 of 223
Shirt orders go straight to HK, master tailor does not touch the shirt.

Master Tailor makes cuts in U.S. then send the suit to HK, and also in charge of making minor changes in between suit fittings.
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post



I think their mast tailor make the cuts at the shop in SF and send it over to Hong Kong/China to get it sewn. I think they send their shirt orders straight to Hong Kong.
post #123 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post

Today I got back my third suit with Spoon, and I am beyond ecstatic.
As I posted earlier, my first suit wasn't 100% there, and that was largely due to Spoon's sewers in HK/China not following exactly the pattern cut by the master tailor, Mr. Lee (Andrew and Calvin's uncle). The second suit suffered less of that problem, but still didn't have the exact lapel gorge position I wanted. At that time, they were still using the same sewer.
But now, according to Andrew, they have hired a new sewer(s) and eliminated that problem. This happened around the same time when they started offering full canvas suits. Apparently, their current sewer is older, more experienced with full canvases, and, most importantly, puts together the suit exactly as it was cut. The result -- what I told Mr. Lee how I wanted everything, got executed 120%. Lapel width, gorge position, button stance, sleeve head size, chest size, waist suppression, etc.
This is the photo I showed Spoon, to be used as a reference:
526
And this is the result:
467
467
467
467
467
I was so happy with it, that I wore it out of their Westin store. And for the next 15 minutes when I walked around Union Square, I got countless looks from the ladies, one guy telling me on the street I looked very sharp, and one retail store clerk asking me where I got it from.
Spoon is the best hidden treasure in town. However, for those of you who haven't done bespoke suits before, keep in mind that it rarely happens that your first suit would give you exactly what you want (and this applies to any tailor). This is because most people only want a "look" but do not know to communicate that to a tailor (e.g., arm hole height, lapel shape/position, button stance, shoulder/collar shape, chest/waist suppression, sleeve pitch/width/length, etc.). Meanwhile, the tailor is usually reluctant to give you an aggressive cut as the first suit, because he doesn't know how comfortable you are with a suit that looks sharp but feels "tighter" from the off-the-shelf boxy ones. Also, don't be afraid to make many trips for alteration -- Mr. Lee was never tired of re-working things.
Now I think I'll throw away some old stuff and shop for more fabrics on Ebay biggrin.gif


Was this their entry $799 suit? Did you use your own fabric? How much do they charge if you provide your own cloth. Thanks a bunch.

post #124 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post



Was this their entry $799 suit? Did you use your own fabric? How much do they charge if you provide your own cloth. Thanks a bunch.



This was their fabric, some Italian light weight worsted wool with a fine herring bone pattern. It was on sale, I think I paid $950 for everything. Last time I brought my own fabric was more than half a year ago, I paid around 600. I assume their price would vary depending what fabric you bring -- more expensive fabric would be pricier I suppose, since they have a higher risk working on a high-end fabric.
post #125 of 223
You are right about the shoulders -- my first two suits with them both needed tweaking on the shoulders, so I was not pushing for a particularly thin padding for this suit, since I know their tailor is more comfortable with the English type of structured construction than the soft, natural Italian look. However, this third suit came back with perfect-fitting shoulders without needing any alteration, which indicates that the pattern has converged pretty nicely. For the next suit I will push for much less padding.

My left sleeve seems better than the right one, partly due to pressing, and partly due to my right triceps being bigger. I'll bring it up next time I go see them to see what can be done. About the mid-section, I think it could be because the inside button was hanging too loose. I'll talk to them about it too.

And thanks for all the great input.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lysandar View Post



I'm not particularly gifted nor as experienced as many of the other gents in this forum - and its great that you like it - but the end-result could look better. For starters, the shoulders seem to be far more padded than your reference photo; coupled with the extension of the pad well beyond your shoulder point, doesn't seem like a good look to me.

There also appears to be plenty of ruffling going on in the sleeves (pitch issue? too much excess cloth?) as well as tightening across the midsection of the suit (pulling downward - a button stance or balance issue?). Perhaps folks with more experience in such matters could shed better light.

Edited by otheme - 4/3/12 at 10:28pm
post #126 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post


This was their fabric, some Italian light weight worsted wool with a fine herring bone pattern. It was on sale, I think I paid $950 for everything. Last time I brought my own fabric was more than half a year ago, I paid around 600. I assume their price would vary depending what fabric you bring -- more expensive fabric would be pricier I suppose, since they have a higher risk working on a high-end fabric.


Makes sense.

post #127 of 223
I saw your post in the other thread. If I may give some unsolicited advice, I wouldn't bother with the "high-end" fabric, most of it is just a label anyway. Look at Cary Grant's suits in the 40's and 50's, none of them was made with "Loro Piana super 160's", and they still look awesome more than 60 years later. (Plus, most of these name brand fabric are labeled OEM fabrics milled somewhere in England anyway.) Just go with the basic 799 fabric and pick a color and pattern you like. For the money you saved you can get a nice pair of AE shoes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post



Makes sense.
post #128 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post

I saw your post in the other thread. If I may give some unsolicited advice, I wouldn't bother with the "high-end" fabric, most of it is just a label anyway. Look at Cary Grant's suits in the 40's and 50's, none of them was made with "Loro Piana super 160's", and they still look awesome more than 60 years later. (Plus, most of these name brand fabric are labeled OEM fabrics milled somewhere in England anyway.) Just go with the basic 799 fabric and pick a color and pattern you like. For the money you saved you can get a nice pair of AE shoes.


Hey thanks for the info. Well, I figured all the hype with Italian designer fabric it's just hype. You are paying extra for the brand name mark up and the import tax. However, I do want to tell people, "Oh yeah, I owe a bespoke suit made with Zegna fabric!" lol

 

Seriously though, I've found a tailor in the bay area goes by the name Jay Hampton. He had a shop in SF since the 60s and recently, he just relocated to Walnut Creek. He told me all of his suits and made with English or Italian fabric and they are cut and the suits made in the U.S. He told me he carries a full line of Zegna fabric. He also told me they don't source their suits to Hong Kong or China. His suits start at $799 and shirts start at $65. He's been in the business for over 40 years. I'm interested in finding out more about his and his shop. I'll make a separate thread since I've found nothing on his shop. Thanks.

post #129 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post

I saw your post in the other thread. If I may give some unsolicited advice, I wouldn't bother with the "high-end" fabric, most of it is just a label anyway. Look at Cary Grant's suits in the 40's and 50's, none of them was made with "Loro Piana super 160's", and they still look awesome more than 60 years later. (Plus, most of these name brand fabric are labeled OEM fabrics milled somewhere in England anyway.) Just go with the basic 799 fabric and pick a color and pattern you like. For the money you saved you can get a nice pair of AE shoes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post



Makes sense.

It might make sense, but it's wrong.
post #130 of 223
One thing I have learned over the years is that one needs to sell himself to the tailor as well. A good tailor will always be overbooked and never be short of business. I am essentially competing with other customers for his attention. Two things help me sell myself. First, be shrewd, but not stingy. I will happily pay for a tailor's good service and work, but not for some hyped up fabrics. Second, one has to convince the tailor that he understands all the subtleties, does not pretend he knows all, and shows his appreciation for extraordinary work. A tailor is a human being and needs appreciation and encouragement like everyone else. Some verbal praise goes a long way.

As to the pricing strcture, there is no right or wrong. It's the market the determines the price. The more people willing to buy custom suits, the more tailors will go into the business, and the cheaper things will get.
post #131 of 223

This makes me thank my lucky stars that I am not a tailor.

 

lefty

post #132 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post


It might make sense, but it's wrong.


Care to elaborate?

post #133 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post

One thing I have learned over the years is that one needs to sell himself to the tailor as well. A good tailor will always be overbooked and never be short of business. I am essentially competing with other customers for his attention. Two things help me sell myself. First, be shrewd, but not stingy. I will happily pay for a tailor's good service and work, but not for some hyped up fabrics. Second, one has to convince the tailor that he understands all the subtleties, does not pretend he knows all, and shows his appreciation for extraordinary work. A tailor is a human being and needs appreciation and encouragement like everyone else. Some verbal praise goes a long way.
As to the pricing strcture, there is no right or wrong. It's the market the determines the price. The more people willing to buy custom suits, the more tailors will go into the business, and the cheaper things will get.


I've always thought the more people are buying custom suits, the price will go up. I tend to go middle of the road fabric. I want something durable and will last for many years to come.

 

post #134 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post


This was their fabric, some Italian light weight worsted wool with a fine herring bone pattern. It was on sale, I think I paid $950 for everything. Last time I brought my own fabric was more than half a year ago, I paid around 600. I assume their price would vary depending what fabric you bring -- more expensive fabric would be pricier I suppose, since they have a higher risk working on a high-end fabric.


Nice suit.Just curious, you mentioned that you used to buy fabric. What places do you recommend to buy fabric at?

post #135 of 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by otheme View Post

Shenzhen or HK, equal-quality labor costs about the same, otherwise one side will starve to death. Efficient market, right? BTW, IPAD3 is also made in Shenzhen.
I don't care if it's sewn in Afghanistan. I am gladly paying $800 for a service that allows me to talk directly to the master tailor during basted shell fitting, the same man who personally cuts my pattern and does unlimited number of follow-up alterations. The fact that it's the same hand that cuts/sews the fabric and feels the suit on my body, that's priceless. Name me one shop in the US or Europe that can offer this kind of service at this price level.
When one commissions a tailored suit, he is buying a service. The material and manufacturing cost is only a small portion. If this is incomprehensible, may I suggest BR factory outlets?


Think before you type.  Apparently you don't care for the labor cost of where a particular item is made, but it's well known if you are familiar with the garment industry in HK that most of the operations has now been relocated to Shenzhen's outskirts with cost savings well in the double digits.  The labor cost between a worker in a HK factory vs one in the mainland is close to a factor 1 to 2.5.  This is why many of those operations shut down in the mid 90s.

 

If what you care more is the personalized service rather than the cost of labor, than more power to you and as long as you are happy that's all that matters.  Sure you talk to the master tailor who ultimately does the fitting and correction, and the original cuts, but he didn't make the entire garment from start to finish.  For some of us who do take that into consideration we don't just exactly wear BR factory outlet suits fing02[1].gif

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › spoon tailor -hong kong bespoke operation in San Francisco