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Dry cleaner faded my tie - advice? - Page 2

post #16 of 20
You never attempt to remove a stain on a tie with anything yourself, let alone water. I'd say that could be considered common knowledge, especially in SF-land
post #17 of 20
The service was rendered and you should not think of demanding your money back. You asked them to try to remove a stain which did not readily come out - their selected method was such that the tie was damaged - as long as it was not a negligent endeavour trying to clean such an obstinate stain is done at your risk.

let it go and move on - too much time has been wasted on this matter already.
post #18 of 20
In my previous comment, I failed to address the issue of payment for the "service provided". I think that the cleaner involved, armed with the knowledge that they don't have the in-house technical skills necessary to handle expensive silk ties, should have just refunded the cost. After all, why make an enemy of a client for $4.00 -- even if that cleaner believed that the request was "unreasonable". The other side of the coin is where the cleaner has the technical skills to remove the stains, has expended more labor on the garment that they could possibly recover in service charges, has done a great job but the client finds some minor spot that could not be removed --- and then refuses to pay for the work performed. It happens all the time. Here's an example: A lady spilt red wine on an off-white St John wool jacket. The waiter at the restaurant told her to immediately treat the areas of the splash with white wine (which according to that expert on stain removal was the "antidote" to red wine). Next day, she called the local St John boutique who referred her to me. We removed every trace of the wine splash with the exception of one small spot in the waist area which we were able to lighten significantly but, somehow, defied all our attempts at complete removal using safe methods. We charged our regular price plus $15 as an additional charge for the extensive labor involved. Even that price didn't come close to covering our labor investment in the garment. When she came in to pick up the garment, she examined every square inch of the jacket, found the one spot that was significantly lightened but not completely removed, declared that she could not possibly wear the garment with that remaining "stain" again, and refused to pay because the St John store had told her that we "performed miracles". I explained that the garment was perfectly wearable, that we'd done everything possible, that the spot was barely noticeable, that no one would know it's there except for her, and that I expected to be compensated for our skills. At that point, she grabbed the jacket and walked out the door, mumbling something about "reporting me to the manager at St. John". Think that that scenario is rare? It happens at least 20 or 30 times a year. Dry cleaners who bring skills to the table ought to be compensated for their services, just like any other professional. If, on the other hand, the dry cleaner merely takes your garment, loads it into a dry cleaning machine, presses the start button and prays for the best possible outcome.......
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stubloom View Post
Dry cleaners who bring skills to the table ought to be compensated for their services, just like any other professional. If, on the other hand, the dry cleaner merely takes your garment, loads it into a dry cleaning machine, presses the start button and prays for the best possible outcome.......

I could not agree more.

Again, as I mentioned, I said I couldn't hold them to removing every stain - I'd just have appreciated it if they could try again.

The only reason I brought up the money at all was that the end result was without a doubt far worse than when I had taken it in. And they said to the effect of 'sometimes this can happen when we try'. To me that sounds like the incompetence (at least on the part of the person she outsourced it to) you described in your last sentence. Looks like they treated the area with some chemicals, which took away some of the stain but faded the hues in the couple of square inches surrounding it.

I would have NEVER dreamed of asking for my money back if the spot hadn't faded completely - only because the tie had a flaw when I brought it in, and they made it unwearable.

To the other poster above - no, to me, that is not services rendered.
post #20 of 20
harry2quinn: I agree, the appropriate level of PROFESSIONAL service was not rendered. I think the dry cleaner mishandled both aspects of the transaction: the quality of product and the quality of service. They didn't have the technical skill to handle the quality of product. They could have tried to compensate for the poor quality of product by handling the quality of service better.
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