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Viberg Boots - Page 1217

post #18241 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootThePier View Post


It changes the look SD to GYW. For me, it was one of the aspects that made me want my first Vibergs. It's almost like changing a steak dinner to vegetarian, may be healthier but not as tasty.
Here are my 310 last Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Those are cool, what's the leather?

post #18242 of 19290
Brown Oil Tan
post #18243 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

No offense meant, but we are not going to do a boot that is an exact replica of a boot that another retailer has done, unless it's a standard model.  

 

It's sorta disrespectful, and also, something that Viberg will definitely just not allow us to do.  

 

I can get behind an all black boot, but let's try to take inspiration from outside the universe of already extant Viberg models, please,  The idea is to do some new and cool stuff, not to cannabalize what has already been done.  I think that the echo boot and our bison "sleek hunter" were great examples of that, and the sleek hunter sold 24 units (it would have been 50+. but we ran out of leather), so clearly, if we make something cool enough, people will get aboard.  Let's take that mindset and run with it, please?


+1 all black boot on 2045. The leather type and last would be whether or not I'd commit

post #18244 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 For example, the Engineer boots that JUST ARRIVED, (and I even got a pair for myself), 

You can't tease that and not post a photo! :tounge: Really psyched for these.

post #18245 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

No offense meant, but we are not going to do a boot that is an exact replica of a boot that another retailer has done, unless it's a standard model.  

 

It's sorta disrespectful, and also, something that Viberg will definitely just not allow us to do.  

 

I can get behind an all black boot, but let's try to take inspiration from outside the universe of already extant Viberg models, please,  The idea is to do some new and cool stuff, not to cannabalize what has already been done.  I think that the echo boot and our bison "sleek hunter" were great examples of that, and the sleek hunter sold 24 units (it would have been 50+. but we ran out of leather), so clearly, if we make something cool enough, people will get aboard.  Let's take that mindset and run with it, please?

Got it.   No offense taken.  I've just always liked that type of boot in the black roughout.   I'm in for new ideas - anything but another 2030. 

post #18246 of 19290
Quote:

Originally Posted by bkotsko View Post

 

Additionally, stitchdown does have a level of structural integrity that GYW does not offer. See below for description from MWS. 

While generally correct, the criticism of the GYW in general does not apply to Viberg's GYW, where leather, not cork or canvas is used in the gemming. so there will be no degradation of the inner layer holding the upper to the welt.  

 

If you dislike the aesthetic, that's a different matter, of course, but GYW is not fundamentally less robust than stitchdown unless the filler is.

 

I was never a hunter, but I held a Wildland firefighter's red card and was on fire lines for a while, and while everyone worse Nick's and White's, it was because those are readily available in this region, and the boots are specifically made to be heat resistant.  Only in those cases have I ever seen boots fail in any way other than leather tearing and/or stitching falling out.   So, I suppose that if you are going to be standing all day on (literally) smoking ground that has just seen a wildfire pass by, then you might have things to worry about.  And really, at that point, what you have to worry about is cracking in the leather upper and melting of the sole.  

post #18247 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootThePier View Post


It changes the look SD to GYW. For me, it was one of the aspects that made me want my first Vibergs. It's almost like changing a steak dinner to vegetarian, may be healthier but not as tasty.

I'd say that the shape of the Viberg boot was what attracted me, in the beginning, and the chunkiness that is associated with stitchdown is not an insignificant part of that appeal

 

That said, for me, that was about 5 years ago now, and while I still appreciate that in certain styles, I would think that I'd be less a fan of stitchdown on, for example, a side-zip or chelsea boot.

 

On some boots (like the all black), I'd advocate for the stitchdown, to get that chunky look, especially with the thick sole.

 

For boots like the echo boot, which is really, for me, more about the treatment of the leather, I'm don't have a strong opinion about construction method, and am happy to go with Brett's suggestions about what works for the leather.

 

Of course, I'm not a workboot purist either.  My personal tastes run more towards the streetwear-y.

post #18248 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by billymax View Post
 

Got it.   No offense taken.  I've just always liked that type of boot in the black roughout.   I'm in for new ideas - anything but another 2030. 

Yeah.  I'd like to set aside the 2030 for a bit.

post #18249 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by metranger8694 View Post
 


I wrote that just for you. Perhaps the 1035 is better suited for a boot than a derby. I don't know. The derby still rocks for me......

 

My Smoke Reverse Kudus on the 1035 are one of my favorite Vibergs.

 

 

Yea, don't get me wrong, I'd still like to score a pair of derbies. Have considered a few different makeups, just haven't pulled the trigger. Unfortunately didn't catch on to the appeal until after the sample sale this year. 

Nice kudus. I've got something in the works with my Kudu's from the sample sale. Will have to check back when they come in.

post #18250 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootThePier View Post

It changes the look SD to GYW. For me, it was one of the aspects that made me want my first Vibergs. It's almost like changing a steak dinner to vegetarian, may be healthier but not as tasty.
Here are my 310 last

The only issue with that analogy being that Goodyear is neither better looking (subjective I know) nor is more robust than SD, so there really isn't much reason to choose it in this case. In other words, it isn't a "healthier" choice.

All this talk resurfacing begs the question though. Did I miss something about Viberg's business model recently? They aren't discontinuing SD are they? Still intending to do both as they initially said back when they introduced Goodyear-welted models?

I still stand behind my old quoted post from above. I proudly wear Goodyear for the price/value ratio it brings, but I don't beat around the bush about recognizing it's inherent flaws. SD is better construction, so if they do away with it, they are cheapening their business.
post #18251 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

While generally correct, the criticism of the GYW in general does not apply to Viberg's GYW, where leather, not cork or canvas is used in the gemming. so there will be no degradation of the inner layer holding the upper to the welt.  

If you dislike the aesthetic, that's a different matter, of course, but GYW is not fundamentally less robust than stitchdown unless the filler is.

I was never a hunter, but I held a Wildland firefighter's red card and was on fire lines for a while, and while everyone worse Nick's and White's, it was because those are readily available in this region, and the boots are specifically made to be heat resistant.  Only in those cases have I ever seen boots fail in any way other than leather tearing and/or stitching falling out.   So, I suppose that if you are going to be standing all day on (literally) smoking ground that has just seen a wildfire pass by, then you might have things to worry about.  And really, at that point, what you have to worry about is cracking in the leather upper and melting of the sole.  

I did not know that they use a leather holdfast. But there is still cementing involved I assume? It would be nice if they detailed their construction of the GYW.
post #18252 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

While generally correct, the criticism of the GYW in general does not apply to Viberg's GYW, where leather, not cork or canvas is used in the gemming. so there will be no degradation of the inner layer holding the upper to the welt.  

If you dislike the aesthetic, that's a different matter, of course, but GYW is not fundamentally less robust than stitchdown unless the filler is.

I was never a hunter, but I held a Wildland firefighter's red card and was on fire lines for a while, and while everyone worse Nick's and White's, it was because those are readily available in this region, and the boots are specifically made to be heat resistant.  Only in those cases have I ever seen boots fail in any way other than leather tearing and/or stitching falling out.   So, I suppose that if you are going to be standing all day on (literally) smoking ground that has just seen a wildfire pass by, then you might have things to worry about.  And really, at that point, what you have to worry about is cracking in the leather upper and melting of the sole.  

I'm afraid that this isn't quite correct. When Goodyear-welting was invented, it initially used a cut and turned leather "feather" the way Viberg is. However, that proved to become brittle over time, and prone to breaking, which jeopardizes the integrity of the inseam. To ameliorate the issue, they began gluing in canvas to reinforce the leather, which was the initial purpose of "gemming." However, that method was replaced somewhere around the Second World War due to improvements in adhesives. That was when they began shifting to entirely adhesive gemming, and did away with the cut and turned leather "feather."

All of these methods are not as structurally sound as a carved leather holdfast, as found in hand-welted footwear.

The filler actually doesn't really impact the integrity. It is required to fill the space created by the size and depth of the turned feather or gemming rib. But, the gemming rib and the filler are independent of each other regarding strength of construction.
post #18253 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

The only issue with that analogy being that Goodyear is neither better looking (subjective I know) nor is more robust than SD, so there really isn't much reason to choose it in this case. In other words, it isn't a "healthier" choice.

All this talk resurfacing begs the question though. Did I miss something about Viberg's business model recently? They aren't discontinuing SD are they? Still intending to do both as they initially said back when they introduced Goodyear-welted models?

I still stand behind my old quoted post from above. I proudly wear Goodyear for the price/value ratio it brings, but I don't beat around the bush about recognizing it's inherent flaws. SD is better construction, so if they do away with it, they are cheapening their business.

I agree "healthier" is a poor comparison because it conveys the wrong message. The only benefit is in the eyes of the beholder, and the manufacturer needs less specialized labor. Where Stitchdown is an excellent comparison to a nice, thick, perfectly cooked steak.
I think I need lunch.
Edited by ShootThePier - 10/14/16 at 1:22pm
post #18254 of 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post


I'm afraid that this isn't quite correct. When Goodyear-welting was invented, it initially used a cut and turned leather "feather" the way Viberg is. However, that proved to become brittle over time, and prone to breaking, which jeopardizes the integrity of the inseam. To ameliorate the issue, they began gluing in canvas to reinforce the leather, which was the initial purpose of "gemming." However, that method was replaced somewhere around the Second World War due to improvements in adhesives. That was when they began shifting to entirely adhesive gemming, and did away with the cut and turned leather "feather."

All of these methods are not as structurally sound as a carved leather holdfast, as found in hand-welted footwear.

The filler actually doesn't really impact the integrity. It is required to fill the space created by the size and depth of the turned feather or gemming rib. But, the gemming rib and the filler are independent of each other regarding strength of construction.

Thanks for the wealth of knowledge MWS. 

post #18255 of 19290

Couldn't find the earlier posts re: side zip (this forum moves super fast!) but I think there's a legitimate debate to be had about whether they'll release these boots in more rugged leathers. From the IG previews it looks like the side zip and chelsea options are going to lean towards dressier with flat welts, single leather soles, suede, goatskin, etc. A side zip with rough out or horsehide might end up being pretty difficult to find.

 

Here's an outside-the-box thought - what about a side-zip similar to the 3sixteen gloxi-cut scout from a couple months back? Something like:

 

2050 last

Tan latigo roughout

Split welt

Off-white gloxi-cut sole

Brass zipper

 

Totally different from anything we're likely to see, even more of a moto boot, interesting streetwear edge. Might catch some strange looks at the office but hey, I live in the Bay Area...

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