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Viberg Boots - Page 1148

post #17206 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akeem View Post


knowing is half the battle

 

Yo Joe!

post #17207 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

While it's true that their GYW feels very sturdy, knowing it's cemented construction just makes it inferior to me. I like the idea of the upper being stitched to the sole.

I'm confused. Are you saying that GYW construction = cemented construction?

GYW is still a fully stitched construction. The difference between GYW and SD is that in GYW, the welt is stitched to the upper, and the outsole is stitched to the welt. SD simply bypasses the welt and stitches straight through the upper to the outsole.
post #17208 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutombo View Post

I'm confused. Are you saying that GYW construction = cemented construction?

GYW is still a fully stitched construction. The difference between GYW and SD is that in GYW, the welt is stitched to the upper, and the outsole is stitched to the welt. SD simply bypasses the welt and stitches straight through the upper to the outsole.

In a hand-welted shoe, the welt is stitched to the upper, the insole, and the outsole (+/- midsole). In nearly all GYW footwear, the welt is not stitched to the insole, but to a piece of fabric cemented to the bottom of the insole. If this cement fails or the fabric decays, the integrity of the footwear is severelt compromised.

There are endless debates here about how often the gemming fails. Nobody, however, denies that it can fail. It is more likely to do so in footwear that has to endure tough conditions or is very old. There are also debates about how difficult it is to repair failed gemming. Ideally, it would be repaired by somebody with access to the original last.


Edit: Corrected "midsole" to "insole" in one spot.
Edited by Whirling - 6/9/16 at 10:05am
post #17209 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post

In a hand-welted shoe, the welt is stitched to the upper, the insole, and the outsole (+/- midsole). In nearly all GYW footwear, the welt is not stitched to the insole, but to a piece of fabric cemented to the bottom of the midsole. If this cement fails or the fabric decays, the integrity of the footwear is severelt compromised.

There are endless debates here about how often the gemming fails. Nobody, however, denies that it can fail. It is more likely to do so in footwear that has to endure tough conditions or is very old. There are also debates about how difficult it is to repair failed gemming. Ideally, it would be repaired by somebody with access to the original last.

Thanks for the clarification. I had forgotten about the gemming being cemented to the midsole. I just haven't seen GYW referred to as cemented construction.
post #17210 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Descry View Post
 

A kind gentleman proxy'd these for me from this year's sample sale. Though, from the angle and fuzzy picture I had originally thought these were cap toe service boots.Turns out these are Country Derby boots, but the color is incredible. My first pair of Viberg's. 

 

Tried them on and the 2040 last these are on seems kind of odd? Fairly tight on my midfoot (which I assume will stretch with wear), though i have tons of toe room. Would a 2030 fare better in this instance? I know they're both E widths, but from what I've read the fit on a 2030 is vastly different.

 

 

Those look like Tan Latigo Derby Boots.  The 2040 last is reminiscent of a "Munson last," which is meant to be "anatomically correct."  I will say that my 2040 waxed flesh derby boots are some of my most comfortable footwear, and they have a ton of miles on them.  Hope you enjoy them!!

post #17211 of 19340
Personally I find the 2040 a compromise between the ultra pronounced toe of the 310 and the low profile/volume of the 2030. It's more like a Redwing Beckman round-toe boot. As such, it looks really solid with a wider range of cuts of jeans and pants. (I tend to wear only straight leg jeans with my 310 boots because they look so out of proportion with a tapered leg jean)
post #17212 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post

In a hand-welted shoe, the welt is stitched to the upper, the insole, and the outsole (+/- midsole). In nearly all GYW footwear, the welt is not stitched to the insole, but to a piece of fabric cemented to the bottom of the midsole. If this cement fails or the fabric decays, the integrity of the footwear is severelt compromised.

There are endless debates here about how often the gemming fails. Nobody, however, denies that it can fail. It is more likely to do so in footwear that has to endure tough conditions or is very old. There are also debates about how difficult it is to repair failed gemming. Ideally, it would be repaired by somebody with access to the original last.

arent all outsoles essentially cemented on? after some wear, the stitching is worn away and the cement holds the outsole in place.
post #17213 of 19340
OMG not the gemming again.
post #17214 of 19340
i prefer the 2045 to 2040 as i have fat teet. the 2040 just felt too narrow in the waist. i am enjoying my 110s a lot as well
post #17215 of 19340

Has anyone experienced shipping delays from Viberg.com this week? I ordered service boots on Monday, and I can see a banner on the website saying that orders from this past week were to go out on 6/7. However, I haven't gotten a response from the Viberg folks via e-mail or phone. (This, in my experience, is uncharacteristic of their usually responsive staff). I wouldn't think the sample sale would have slowed down their workflow this much, so is there another reason for the stoppage (e.g., Alden closes shop for like a week in the summertime)? 

post #17216 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by docalden2013 View Post
 

Has anyone experienced shipping delays from Viberg.com this week? I ordered service boots on Monday, and I can see a banner on the website saying that orders from this past week were to go out on 6/7. However, I haven't gotten a response from the Viberg folks via e-mail or phone. (This, in my experience, is uncharacteristic of their usually responsive staff). I wouldn't think the sample sale would have slowed down their workflow this much, so is there another reason for the stoppage (e.g., Alden closes shop for like a week in the summertime)? 

They got back from NY on Monday night. I'm sure they had a lot to get to on Tuesday. It's only a few people in the company so give them time and have some patience as it was certainly a busy week for them.

post #17217 of 19340


Yea, and Drew wasn't traveling back until Wednesday...he's usually their main e-mail guy I think. So I'm guessing he's going to have a long Thursday....

post #17218 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by grizzlygiant View Post

They got back from NY on Monday night. I'm sure they had a lot to get to on Tuesday. It's only a few people in the company so give them time and have some patience as it was certainly a busy week for them.

So the sample sale was the issue. Thanks for clarifying.
post #17219 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post


In a hand-welted shoe, the welt is stitched to the upper, the insole, and the outsole (+/- midsole). In nearly all GYW footwear, the welt is not stitched to the insole, but to a piece of fabric cemented to the bottom of the midsole. If this cement fails or the fabric decays, the integrity of the footwear is severelt compromised.

There are endless debates here about how often the gemming fails. Nobody, however, denies that it can fail. It is more likely to do so in footwear that has to endure tough conditions or is very old. There are also debates about how difficult it is to repair failed gemming. Ideally, it would be repaired by somebody with access to the original last.

 

I dont want to start a GYW debate here, but do wonder if anyone knows exactly how Viberg does their GYW -- there was a photo on their instagram showing a channeling machine that cuts a groove into the insole during the stitching process that functions similarly to a canvas rib (i.e. gemming) that is typically glued on on GYW shoes.  Does Viberg GYW use this channeling, or the more conventional glued on rib?

 

Also, I"m curious about how the comfort of Viberg GYW shoes/boots compare to their stitch down offerings.  I have a pair of stich down Half-Japanese, and even after 90 wears or so and several hundred of miles of walking the soles are still nearly as hard, stiff, and un-conformed to my foot as they were when new. I wonder how their GYW shoes, which presumably use a cork layer, perform in this regard.   My other GYW shoes (e.g. my JM Westons, which are themselves know to be rather stiff and unforgiving) were not only more comfortable out of the box, their soles have (very slowly) conformed to the shape of my foot.

 

   This is in contrast to, say, my JM Weston GYW shoes which are

post #17220 of 19340
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemononame View Post

I dont want to start a GYW debate here, but do wonder if anyone knows exactly how Viberg does their GYW -- there was a photo on their instagram showing a channeling machine that cuts a groove into the insole during the stitching process that functions similarly to a canvas rib (i.e. gemming) that is typically glued on on GYW shoes.  Does Viberg GYW use this channeling, or the more conventional glued on rib?

Also, I"m curious about how the comfort of Viberg GYW shoes/boots compare to their stitch down offerings.  I have a pair of stich down Half-Japanese, and even after 90 wears or so and several hundred of miles of walking the soles are still nearly as hard, stiff, and un-conformed to my foot as they were when new. I wonder how their GYW shoes, which presumably use a cork layer, perform in this regard.   My other GYW shoes (e.g. my JM Westons, which are themselves know to be rather stiff and unforgiving) were not only more comfortable out of the box, their soles have (very slowly) conformed to the shape of my foot.

   This is in contrast to, say, my JM Weston GYW shoes which are

pretty sure viberg uses standard gemming. they mentioned they use the same construction as the English makers.

as for comfort, I've not seen a difference in comfort between the SD or GYW, but more so with the sole type. I find viberg to be generally hard wearing and needing hiker socks to add some comfort. I don't think they use cork under the footbed for filler. my aldens are more comfortable in comparison.
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