or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Tailors/Retailers in Vancouver
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tailors/Retailers in Vancouver - Page 2

post #16 of 22
julie was busy when i called pauls; however, the lady said that with fabric starting price is $800 - i imagine the work ONLY is cheaper


Tony Arletto at European Custom Tailors was a little more expensive.they were $800 without the fabric.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
julie was busy when i called pauls; however, the lady said that with fabric starting price is $800 - i imagine the work ONLY is cheaper

Tony Arletto at European Custom Tailors was a little more expensive.they were $800 without the fabric.
Oh, OK. You mean that at Paul's, the price for a suit (?) is $800 if they supply the fabric, but at Tony's the price is $800 if you supply the fabric? That surprises me a little; you might want to call back and talk to Julie. For trousers, the price of tailoring only (i.e., you supply the fabric) is, if I understood this right, $195. I have a pair being done right now, and I purchased the wool myself--some Holland & Sherry flannel that cost me $225 Cdn. for enough for a pair of trousers. They do have lots of wool on hand there, however, and if you went with a less-expensive wool, I imagine you could get a pair made up--using their wool--for maybe $265 (I'm guessing here). They also have some very nice Zegna wool if you want to use better wool, but don't want to get it yourself in advance.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger
Oh, OK. You mean that at Paul's, the price for a suit (?) is $800 if they supply the fabric, but at Tony's the price is $800 if you supply the fabric? That surprises me a little; you might want to call back and talk to Julie. For trousers, the price of tailoring only (i.e., you supply the fabric) is, if I understood this right, $195. I have a pair being done right now, and I purchased the wool myself--some Holland & Sherry flannel that cost me $225 Cdn. for enough for a pair of trousers. They do have lots of wool on hand there, however, and if you went with a less-expensive wool, I imagine you could get a pair made up--using their wool--for maybe $265 (I'm guessing here). They also have some very nice Zegna wool if you want to use better wool, but don't want to get it yourself in advance.

sorry for not being clear, i am looking at a full suit:
Pauls: $800 fabric included (i imagine for lesser fabrics at that price, i think $1000+ for zegna fabrics,)
Tonys $800 "labor" only

On a side note: Pauls has quoted me $200 for pants that include fabric. - cant imagine the labor alone would be more than that. the fabrics were limited and i believe she [Julie] was trying to "Blow" them out


Afterthought: is there a guide to fabrics...im am curious as to what the minimum standard for "acceptable" is (opinions held by members of this board)

what the difference between a HS 120s or a less named wool 120s
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
On a side note: Pauls has quoted me $200 for pants that include fabric. - cant imagine the labor alone would be more than that. the fabrics were limited and i believe she [Julie] was trying to "Blow" them out
I'll have to look into that, as it makes the $195 for pants with customer supplying fabric seem pretty high. On the other hand, there were a few special features that I wanted.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
Afterthought: is there a guide to fabrics...im am curious as to what the minimum standard for "acceptable" is (opinions held by members of this board)
what the difference between a HS 120s or a less named wool 120s
That's really a tough one to answer. I'm not aware of any guide to fabrics, and I'm sure you'd get widely varying opinions about what is considered "acceptable." Generally, speaking--and all other things equal (which they never are)--the higher the yarn number, the higher quality the wool (finer fibers). But there are other factors to consider. Wear is one; a suit made of 150s won't wear as well as one made of 100s, and this is particularly true when you consider the suit pants, or any pants for that matter. Another factor is drape. The high Supers (like 180s, for example) just don't drape as well as a wool with a lower yarn number (like 100s).

And then there is the mill from which the wool came. I'm certainly not an expert on this, but I've seen it written many times that "all 150s were not created equal," for example. If you peruse the various sources of fine wools, you'll see big price differences for what appear to be very similar wools with the same yarn number. The Holland & Sherry flannel I bought (in both gray and brown) cost me 70 GBP per meter. It was from their Viceroy flannel book, and is really very fine flannel, although having a yarn number of only 100s. For a little more, I could have purchased Lesser flannel (their Golden Bale line, again 100s). However, for much less I could have purchased some Dormeuil 100s flannel, along with 100s flannel from other mills. The wool that Julie is "blowing out" is probably of relatively low quality.

One thing you could do if you're interested in actually seeing wool samples of varying degrees of quality is to go to Madison Men's Wear in the Bentall Centre at the corner of Pender and Burrard and ask to see some of their fabric books. Barron Lee is the person to see and discuss this with. He's just a helluva nice guy and extremely knowledgeable--having been in the business for more than 40 years. Ask to see the Holland & Sherry and Scabal books, along with anything else he has. He can bring in wool lengths, although his price is (understandably) higher than what you'd pay getting them directly from the mill or the mill's agent.
post #20 of 22
thanks for the reply, ill pop in on Barron Lee next time im in that area.
2 quick questions:

Quote:
a suit made of 150s won't wear as well as one made of 100s,
please correct me if im wrong, but this statement is the same as "the super 100's are more durable, but less luxurious"

Quote:
The high Supers (like 180s, for example) just don't drape as well as a wool with a lower yarn number (like 100s).
i cant believe that 100s drapes better than 180s?

if thats true, i just cant see the need to go over 100's, better wear, better drape.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
thanks for the reply, ill pop in on Barron Lee next time im in that area.
2 quick questions: please correct me if im wrong, but this statement is the same as "the super 100's are more durable, but less luxurious"
That's pretty close to nailing it, I'd say.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorially senseless
i cant believe that 100s drapes better than 180s? if thats true, i just cant see the need to go over 100's, better wear, better drape.
Well it is true! The thing people like about the high yarn-number fabrics is their wonderful hand and softness. Super 180s wool is very close to cashmere in that regard. Actually Super 180s is about 14 micron, and a lot of cashmere is actually coarser than that (some commercial cashmere going as much as 17 microns)--although the very best cashmere (like what you might see in a Kiton garment, for example) is finer than that, maybe 12 microns. So the 180s garment is just wonderfully soft and fine, but it really doesn't drape well at all. All that softness just prevents it from dropping and hanging with authority (if that's the word).
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by pg34
Which thrift stores? I haven't had that much luck.

Winners. I've turned up some generic stuff, new in the $10-$15 range that costs $50-$100 elsewhere. My $10 shirt doesn't have quite so good movement in the shoulders, but I've gotten a nice one I was happy with for $25. Same with pants, I've gotten some nice cords and jeans in the $15-$30 range, although the jeans don't give me that much flexibility which is somewhat annoying. Winners has me not bothering with most of the other stores, I don't see what's great about the clothes that cost $100-$200 compared to the same stuff I find on clearance for 10% of that. I could see paying the $200 mentioned here for a custom pair of pants though, since most pants have a 32 inch inseam and I'd do better with a 30 inch (or raised heels, either way so I don't step on my hem).

Mark's Work Wearhouse also has some good stuff on clearance, has a clean casual look and that's where I shopped when I was in high school. I'd turn up some nice pants in the $20 range there.

Value Village is apparently very good for second hand stuff, I haven't checked it yet, but I think it would be hard to be terribly disappointed on a $5 pair of cords.

BTW, is there a FAQ somewhere for what the numbers mean?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Tailors/Retailers in Vancouver