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Management Consulting Discussion - Page 35

post #511 of 516
Well to be fair, they could be changing some things now. From.my contacts still there, doesn't sound like it...but I'm not there anymore. Also Deloitte was purely a bean counter set up for a while, then got into management and IT consulting and what I feel a large part of their problem was at least in Fed was buying g out of Bearing Points Federal practice. This created some issues for various reasons.

To someone who mentioned Fed consulting and seeing tax dollars being wasted, I can say this is partially true. In my past as a consultant, I was fortunate enough to be on some very cool projects dealing with federal, state and local govt as well as some interesting strategy with BAH...of course there were a few Fed dept's that were just terrible wastes of time and money as well.
post #512 of 516
Hi all,

I'm at a point in my career where I'm a bit of a middle-manager, but feel I am lacking heavily on the business strategy and research side of things. (I've been much more on the software product/development side of things and more in the weeds).
I have no masters degree, or an MBA in particular.

What I'd like to achieve is learning some of the recommended business frameworks or strategies so I can feel more competent when discussing the landscape of the market, competition, etc.

If you wanted to get someone caught up with the most useful knowledge in the least amount of time, where would you start?

Maybe some specific questions to start:
1. In researching the viability of a product/market, what are the core things you look at?
2. Where do you get most of your data for research? (Estimating market size, competition, etc). Hopefully free sources.
3. Which frameworks are still modern and actually practical/useful?

Any other tips? Maybe I should make this a separate post in this forum, but the consulting thread seemed like a good place to start.

Thanks!
post #513 of 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerostyle View Post

Hi all,

I'm at a point in my career where I'm a bit of a middle-manager, but feel I am lacking heavily on the business strategy and research side of things. (I've been much more on the software product/development side of things and more in the weeds).
I have no masters degree, or an MBA in particular.

What I'd like to achieve is learning some of the recommended business frameworks or strategies so I can feel more competent when discussing the landscape of the market, competition, etc.

If you wanted to get someone caught up with the most useful knowledge in the least amount of time, where would you start?

Maybe some specific questions to start:
1. In researching the viability of a product/market, what are the core things you look at?
2. Where do you get most of your data for research? (Estimating market size, competition, etc). Hopefully free sources.
3. Which frameworks are still modern and actually practical/useful?

Any other tips? Maybe I should make this a separate post in this forum, but the consulting thread seemed like a good place to start.

Thanks!


Hmm, some interesting questions.

 

I'd recommend Lords of Strategy to read to understand how the industry emerged and got to where it is today. There is another, if very dry, book called Strategy Safari that explains where the schools of strategy are today.

 

Data wise there are a lot of major and niche data providers depending on the industry.

 

Really at a middle management level a lot of it would come down to the case practice you would do in your MBA. If you can find a friend to share those cases with you then you'd be golden.

post #514 of 516

Why not just get your PMP for now? I am in no way comparing a PMP to an MBA, however I am suggesting that just might not need all of the bells and whistles of an MBA depending on where you are in your career and where you want to go.

 

True story - Ex colleague of mine from Booz Allen days, went on to get his MBA from Johns Hopkins. He was interviewing around before finally ending up at PWC, but on 2 occasions back to back, he was asked if he had a PMP. He answered "No but I have a Masters from Johns Hopkins..." didn't matter. I do not know if they didn't like the assumed salary increase, or that maybe he simply was overly qualified, but I do know the 2 places he interviewed for were his first 2 choices and they simply didn't want him without the PMP.


Moral of the story -  depending on the field you're in, it may not be worth spending that 40-60k (average) or the 100k (top tier) to get that degree.

My personal take - no doubt an MBA is beneficial in the long run, depending on your goal. Is it needed? In my honest opinion, its needed in some industries, but as you see resume's flooded with MBA's that are just online junk, more and more people skim past them. Obviously people in the big 4 commercial consulting firms will want to consider MBA track eventually, but some of you in different industries might just save your money.. A strong bachelor + work experience (meaning you hustle) and maybe a basic management cert would get you a lot further than you might imagine.

post #515 of 516
^ Agree that any sort of project management work in the Fed space prefers PMP to MBA.
post #516 of 516

If you truly care about doing actual strategy, go join a small start-up, get paid a smallerish base to survive on, get some equity, rinse, repeat

 

roll the dice a few times, you will end up 1) happier because your strategy stuff will actually matter 2) you *might* hit the jackpot with a small firm and can retire early 3) you will have time to enjoy your life

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