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Management Consulting Discussion - Page 25

post #361 of 502
Whenever I have written my resume I have included
1) A short sentence on each of the positions I have held (e.g., Manager, Junior Partner, Partner) describing the role and what it entailed
2) Under each of the positions I then include some example projects, to give an indication of the type of work I have done

Obviously if you have held other big positions of responsibility (practice, office, etc) you should also include these - a rare opportunity to show real managerial experience in MC

R-O-T
post #362 of 502
Sorry - double post
post #363 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRINI View Post

Question for all the consultants out there.
I did a brief stint in consulting when I first left school and have since moved into industry.
I'm just refreshing my resume and am curious as to how you reflect your time in consulting. Do you select a few key projects you worked on and do bullet points for each?
Or do you summarize and give a general statement regarding the type of projects you worked on and the value you added.
Appreciate your thoughts on this.

Use your most senior title and role. Speak broadly about clients and industries.
Don't say something you can't back up though.
post #364 of 502
I could use a drink right about now
post #365 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macallan9 View Post

What's the deal with Docs (Medical Doctorate) going into consulting? AF brought it up earlier in the thread and i was curious - whats the pay like, lifestyle, factors they look for in hiring, etc.
Are MDs used for particular projects, or is this more of a springboard thing where the degree gets you a look but it's still based on your other work experiences and ability to get through the interviews? is it a separate interview process?
Not really something I had ever thought about (I'd never heard of anyone in medicine switching over until this thread, actually) but am curious.

I am one, and I'd say the pay is probably comparable or worse depending on your specialty. I think the work is more interesting and higher level in general (never was much of a labrat), but I miss working with my hands and doing surgery.

I do a lot of medtech and pharma cases, but my firm doesn't restrict me to it. Interview process is slightly separate, but frankly we are held to the same standards as the MBAs, and so far I haven't seen much value add from having an MBA degree.
post #366 of 502
Akatsui, could you extrapolate on this:

"I've seen little value add from MBA"

Oddly enough, I'm actually studying for the GMAT right now. What kinds of degrees or types of work histories prove to be most useful in your field?
post #367 of 502
I'm considering an MBA as well in 2-3 years.

I hear it is getting more and more useless due to over saturation.

To me it actually makes a lot of sense to jump from engineering/medical field into management consulting in the business side. It is much easier to learn and understand the technical field of work and then transitioning into management position with emphasis on consulting.

My uncle did the same and currently is working for the government mapping out locations to prepare for environmental disasters i.e floods. He manages a team consisting of engineers, computer scientists, and a few guys in finance & accounting.
post #368 of 502
A lot of MBAs don't really learn much since the schools are just glorified networking centers.

There are a handful of schools with pretty rigorous programs where it might absolutely make a differance. I also feel like part time students from some of the top schools (the few that offer part time) often end up learning more since they are usually there actively trying to learn something rather than just doing whatever they can to get hooked up with the next job.

It really depends on the specialty and the work though....a Finance MBA from Chicago should be pretty rigorous and if you go into a fairly technical field after that, there will absolutely be value added from the additional education. If you do a more general management/marketing program and then get into some strategy consulting where they throw you into industries that you know nothing about...the fact that you have an MBA won't really help you any more than an extra 2 years of work experience might.
post #369 of 502
Do MBA programs get you acquainted at all with different industries whether it is through writing & reading, projects and lectures? How about case studies? Or is industry choice made at the very beginning of your program?

I think there is a misconception about a business administration degree with 'X' concentration. Mathematics or the sciences should be a subject undergraduates consider then think about a graduate program like MBA in which case they already have some idea about a technical field. It is sort of like that train of thought for going to law school where you do not want to major in a humanities program thinking it will lead you to a law program. Law undergrad ≠ law school

Which reminds me to go read Manton's "Don't Go to Grad School" thread.
post #370 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

I hear it is getting more and more useless due to over saturation.

No wonder with factory schools like HBS and their (my opinion) ridiculous 2+2 program (Class of 2015 has 100 admits out of 900ish total student body) churning out kids. I wouldn't have appreciated sitting in a class and having discussions with inexperienced fellows - at HBS it is promoted as diversity.
post #371 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

Akatsui, could you extrapolate on this:
"I've seen little value add from MBA"
Oddly enough, I'm actually studying for the GMAT right now. What kinds of degrees or types of work histories prove to be most useful in your field?

MD, engineering or a hardcore math/science degree.

Versus MBAs you get a decent level of statistical knowledge for clinical trials, rigor in analysis, and a good sense of how to break down a problem and prioritize. Social skills are important if a bit undervalued in MD programs, but dealing with patients is far harder than dealing with CEOs, and also you have a better sense of proportion, since it isn't someone's life on the line. Also, MBAs tend to bitch a lot about working past 8 or so for a couple of days or working on weekends.

Versus science PhDs, you are more comfortable with the uncertainty of doing an analysis based on an n of 8. You have more social skills. You probably have less quant skills and less patience for bureaucracy. Probably can't run SPSS/Strata analysis either.

MBAs have excel and powerpoint knowledge that takes 3-4 months to figure out. If you want analytic finance skills - U of C is supposed to be good as mentioned above, but frankly a lot of the quants I know are ex-physics and maths guys, and we could definitely use people who understood math at that level in consulting.

The networking/clannish aspect of B-school is really weird from an outsider perspective though.

Obviously these are generalizations and just my opinion.
post #372 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

Here's a good read on what 'value' consultants add to organizations. The first answer is the best.
http://www.quora.com/Management-Consulting-Management-Consulting-Firms/What-value-do-consulting-firms-like-McKinsey-Bain-et-al-really-add-to-an-operation

This is a great post - but your industry may be different to ours here in Australia, because kids fresh out of college / business school do not make up the bulk of our workforce.

 

In fact, SME's are the value we bring to a lot of our clients - perhaps this is because we're not one of the "big 3" strategy houses and we play further down the stack than they do (ehhh strategy houses haha)

post #373 of 502

What did you guys major in to go into the field? Or, what would you recommend? I'm entering college next year and I was thinking of an Economics or Economics and Math major. But I've heard that engineering/computer science majors are really useful nowadays. 

post #374 of 502
Oh, yeah, management consulting is bullshit. It pays well but don't go into it thinking it will become a rewarding career.
post #375 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

Oh, yeah, management consulting is bullshit. It pays well but don't go into it thinking it will become a rewarding career.

How so? The travel does seem nice (I haven't traveled much in my life), but it seems that the job really takes a huge toll on your social life. Investment banking seems the same. I'm just having a bit of trouble figuring out some career options for me. I know I'd like to go into some sort of business/finance job. One of my strengths is with computers, which may be helpful?

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