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Management Consulting Discussion - Page 17

post #241 of 502
?
post #242 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by spacecowboy View Post
We all have friends like these.....

when you say MBB want to see sth new and exciting on the resume before giving you another chance, what would you considering new and exciting? an internship, recent completion of a degree, another publication(probably not?) or sth else? please enlighten me

Since nobody better qualified is responding to this, I'll give it a shot.
I would imagine they like to see some kind of additional achievement that would demonstrate your professional development and substantiate your suitability as a hire.
So, let's say you work for J.P.Morgan or Intel for some time and manage to xxx yyy by zz %, etc, that would definitely work. Or maybe if you go and win some kind of prestigious competition, be it case or otherwise. Another publication is probably not going to cut it, not because it's not impressive, but because it's more of the same. Completion of a degree will probably not work either if it was already anticipated when you last applied.
It may all go out the window, though, if they really need people.
Again, I have no inside knowledge so somebody please correct me if I'm wrong.
post #243 of 502
Artisan,

I wanted to express my thanks to you for the interesting and excellent advice you've been doling out, free of charge. It's already had an impact on the way I'm thinking and working, actually, and I made this account just to send you this message (previously I was just a lurker trying to find a better cobbler/drycleaner/tailor in nyc on a semi-regular basis).

I noticed that you mentioned your expertise in media mix optimization. Are there significant opportunities for work in this area amongst the consulting firms? I currently work at one of the large media agencies, and, while I currently have a great track within the agency, I'd like to start thinking about options for a few years down the road when changing firms has substantial upsides to staying here.

Thank you for time, and again, for your advice!
post #244 of 502
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by exaequo View Post
Artisan,

I wanted to express my thanks to you for the interesting and excellent advice you've been doling out, free of charge. It's already had an impact on the way I'm thinking and working, actually, and I made this account just to send you this message (previously I was just a lurker trying to find a better cobbler/drycleaner/tailor in nyc on a semi-regular basis).

I noticed that you mentioned your expertise in media mix optimization. Are there significant opportunities for work in this area amongst the consulting firms? I currently work at one of the large media agencies, and, while I currently have a great track within the agency, I'd like to start thinking about options for a few years down the road when changing firms has substantial upsides to staying here.

Thank you for time, and again, for your advice!

Thank you very much. I'm 45 and just felt like sharing some thoughts would be helpful.

Now on MMO. I'm a consulting leader in this area and there is lots of opportunity. Many consulting firms are getting into this area and there are several existing boutiques doing well.
post #245 of 502
That's great to hear. We're actually building an internal consulting practice that's going the be the cutting edge group within the agency, and I've been offered a lateral opportunity into that group, which is what got me thinking about the difference in approaches between my agency and a consultancy. One thing I definitely find a little frustrating is that the average results analysis here doesn't drive to the bottom line. It stops at media performance relative to the marketplace and the financial terms of the deal itself. We should be much better at measuring our delivery of value given the serious amount of money we're dealing with.
post #246 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by kxk View Post
how? the opportunity just popped up?.

I worked at one of the top firms in NYC, and several of my former colleagues made the transition from MC to I-banking. Of course, this was reasonable given that we were all part of the financial services practice and had relevant knowledge of the capital markets. The best opportunities arose through personal networks, then recruiters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kxk View Post
thanks for the responses. i don't have delusions of becoming a wall st billionaire through banking. i think what i'd really like to do at the end of the day is VC or PE, and was wondering if banking might be a reasonable detour if there are no opportunities when it comes time to leave. the problem is that i have no finance/quant background whatsoever, and being an APD, already starting in a post-MBA role and pushing 30 soon--taking b-schools largely out of the equation.

IMO, VC and PE are quite different in that firms expect distinct skills and experience. Others have covered this, but VC requires deep subject matter expertise, often acquired by being an entrepreneur, and the ability to source deals. PE prizes finance and transaction experience. It's hard to pursue both, so think hard about what makes sense for you.
post #247 of 502
AF:

What does a qualitative major (Philosophy) need to even get a shot at breaking this field? I'm knee deep in my major reqs so I won't be able to get out. I still have 2 years left but I mean, most of those are going to be bogged down with upper div philo classes.

I am/have
- Attending a top 25 school
- A GPA close to 3.9
- Taken 2 semesters of calculus.
- Taken Introductory Economics
- A decent SAT Math score (mid 700s)

I intend on
- Taking a business related stats class
- Another one (or two, schedule permitting) business/economics related class (micro analysis and something else?)

Any suggestions/advice to prove to employers that I can handle the quantitative side of the work? Any suggestions/advice in general actually.
post #248 of 502
^ you have the academic chops. Just think of a way to get your first interview through an honest but unique story. After that, it's just you and the interviewers and there are a lot of resources on that out there. I'd recommend spending about 15 minutes with Case in Point and then actually practicing with people.
post #249 of 502
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post
AF:

What does a qualitative major (Philosophy) need to even get a shot at breaking this field? I'm knee deep in my major reqs so I won't be able to get out. I still have 2 years left but I mean, most of those are going to be bogged down with upper div philo classes.

I am/have
- Attending a top 25 school
- A GPA close to 3.9
- Taken 2 semesters of calculus.
- Taken Introductory Economics
- A decent SAT Math score (mid 700s)

I intend on
- Taking a business related stats class
- Another one (or two, schedule permitting) business/economics related class (micro analysis and something else?)

Any suggestions/advice to prove to employers that I can handle the quantitative side of the work? Any suggestions/advice in general actually.

What ramuman said is good advice but also see if you can do some analytical work via a research project or internship. Ideally something that solves a complex business problem and produces results, ideally quantitative results but qualitative may work also.
post #250 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by marin View Post
PE prizes finance and transaction experience.

Especially now where a lot of the profit is financial engineering, there are too many players chasing too few deals, and companies are handed around like hot potato.
post #251 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post
AF:

What does a qualitative major (Philosophy) need to even get a shot at breaking this field? I'm knee deep in my major reqs so I won't be able to get out. I still have 2 years left but I mean, most of those are going to be bogged down with upper div philo classes.

I am/have
- Attending a top 25 school
- A GPA close to 3.9
- Taken 2 semesters of calculus.
- Taken Introductory Economics
- A decent SAT Math score (mid 700s)

I intend on
- Taking a business related stats class
- Another one (or two, schedule permitting) business/economics related class (micro analysis and something else?)

Any suggestions/advice to prove to employers that I can handle the quantitative side of the work? Any suggestions/advice in general actually.

Best advice for proving your understanding of quantitative side would be to publish / co-publish a good scientific paper.
post #252 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post
Especially now where a lot of the profit is financial engineering, there are too many players chasing too few deals, and companies are handed around like hot potato.

what is financial engineering? i've heard that term get thrown around a lot this week from various people...
post #253 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemos View Post
Best advice for proving your understanding of quantitative side would be to publish / co-publish a good scientific paper.
Patents speak louder than papers.
post #254 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by marin View Post
I worked at one of the top firms in NYC, and several of my former colleagues made the transition from MC to I-banking. Of course, this was reasonable given that we were all part of the financial services practice and had relevant knowledge of the capital markets. The best opportunities arose through personal networks, then recruiters. IMO, VC and PE are quite different in that firms expect distinct skills and experience. Others have covered this, but VC requires deep subject matter expertise, often acquired by being an entrepreneur, and the ability to source deals. PE prizes finance and transaction experience. It's hard to pursue both, so think hard about what makes sense for you.
I agree with the above. FWIW, my thoughts on VC as a career...most successful VCs never started their career with the "intention of landing a VC gig". A VC job IMO comes to you as opposed to you going to it. Start a company, be a successful entrepreneur, be an early employee at a hugely successful startup...that's how a VC job will come to you. Not by just attending an MBA course or working in MC / IB.
post #255 of 502
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post
Patents speak louder than papers.
If you have the time. The patent examiner has been working on my patent for 6 years.
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