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Poor man's watch thread - Page 410

post #6136 of 6369

^^^ Those are some handsome watches.  What happens, though, if you need a warranty repair or servicing down the road.

post #6137 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post
 

^^^ Those are some handsome watches.  What happens, though, if you need a warranty repair or servicing down the road.

 

The watch community is full of people who are familiar with working on these watches, there are plenty of service manuals available, and any competent watchmaker who can safely service an ETA movement will be able to work on these. I highly recommend them, check out the Russian watch section at WatchUSeek forum for more info. Meranom is the online retailer most people go to for their simple watches. For chronographs, I like poljot24.de

post #6138 of 6369
Serviceability is less a function of the skill of the individual and more a function of access to parts. Parts are very easy to come by for ETA movements and their clones.
post #6139 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

Serviceability is less a function of the skill of the individual and more a function of access to parts. Parts are very easy to come by for ETA movements and their clones.

 

In the course of normal wear, there is nothing in these watches that would warrant replacing; there are thousands of perfectly working examples that date from the 70s and 80s floating around. They are built tough and resist shocks very well. In the event of parts necessity, the factory that (to this day) produces these watches will sell any parts that are needed, and whole donor movements can be bought for a few dollars. It is pretty much a non issue, to be honest.

post #6140 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post
 

 

In the course of normal wear, there is nothing in these watches that would warrant replacing; there are thousands of perfectly working examples that date from the 70s and 80s floating around. They are built tough and resist shocks very well. In the event of parts necessity, the factory that (to this day) produces these watches will sell any parts that are needed, and whole donor movements can be bought for a few dollars. It is pretty much a non issue, to be honest.

 

Parts are routinely replaced in a full servicing.  And stuff sometimes breaks in any mechanical device, watches included.

 

But it's good to know that parts are available from the manufacturer.  That's the short answer to servicing concerns.

post #6141 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post

Im a huge fan of russian watches. Mechanically solid, the engineering behind the amphibia to achieve 200m resistance is elegant in its simplicity. As long as you avoid painted dials and are open to some aftermarket add-ons, they can be incredible watches.


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

The russian chronographs (Sturmanskie, Strela, Okean) represent some of the best value for solid, pedigreed handwinding chronograph movements. The OKEAH (Ocean) reissue is a beauty to behold.



The dress watches with the 2209 movement were (and are) some of the thinnest mechanical movements in the world



The raketa big zero is an awesome piece from the late soviet union with a unique, eye catching design.



Many of these watches were engineered very well, require minimal service, and are available extremely cheap (on the order of $50-60 for one in good condition, sometimes way less. Even a totally flawless NOS example is $100-150). They arent being made any more and many of them exemplify a unique aesthetic from a bygone era. I cant say for sure they will ever be worth significant sums, but they are always a great conversation starter for watch people.



 





































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Superb collection.
post #6142 of 6369
just nabbed this

post #6143 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

Parts are routinely replaced in a full servicing.  And stuff sometimes breaks in any mechanical device, watches included.

But it's good to know that parts are available from the manufacturer.  That's the short answer to servicing concerns.

I misworded my original post, I didn't mean to make it sound like the watches are out of production. Only the older style Raketas are. Vostok Amphibias are produced in numerous variations.

As for parts, these watches really will go decades with simple oil and cleaning
post #6144 of 6369
@DerangedGoose lovely watches. What is that classic gold dress watch? Is it in production?
post #6145 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post

Im a huge fan of russian watches. Mechanically solid, the engineering behind the amphibia to achieve 200m resistance is elegant in its simplicity. As long as you avoid painted dials and are open to some aftermarket add-ons, they can be incredible watches.



The russian chronographs (Sturmanskie, Strela, Okean) represent some of the best value for solid, pedigreed handwinding chronograph movements. The OKEAH (Ocean) reissue is a beauty to behold.



The dress watches with the 2209 movement were (and are) some of the thinnest mechanical movements in the world



The raketa big zero is an awesome piece from the late soviet union with a unique, eye catching design.



Many of these watches were engineered very well, require minimal service, and are available extremely cheap (on the order of $50-60 for one in good condition, sometimes way less. Even a totally flawless NOS example is $100-150). The raketas being made any more (the brand still exists and makes russian watches, but to a more modern aesthetic and a higher price point, though they have some throwback models) and many of them exemplify a unique aesthetic from a bygone era. I cant say for sure they will ever be worth significant sums, but they are always a great conversation starter for watch people. The Vostok Amphibia is still manufactured today in good numbers, the brand seems to be growing strongly the last few years. The chronos are still available as well



 











can anyone help with a specific model name on these?
post #6146 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Daylight pics another time, but I am loving the pure silliness of it, right out of the...er...tube: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

The silliness of the Shark Diver (at least this one) is that it's so tall, with massive square lugs that really exaggerate its nominal 45mm case width.  It feels like carrying a car alternator on the wrist, but that's kind of what I wanted.  At under $400 with the Miyota option, it's a very accessible indulgence. smile.gif

Great PMW selection! I have three from Helson and love them all - a Skindiver and two Sharkmasters. The Shark Diver has been on my radar for a while, but I want to go with the 40mm version. My Skindiver has a Miyota engine in it (the Sharkmasters are ETA) and it has a pretty good power reserve and keeps really good time. Definitely some good value in Helson.


(Not pictured is my recently acquired PVD Sharkmaster)
post #6147 of 6369
Daylight, outdoor vs indoor, the blue is very subtle:



It's thick, of course:


The rubber strap was comfortable, but I liked the look of the leather-lined worn canvas from Panatime. Suits the steam-punk-tool aesthetic of the big bronze beast, I think.

But Madame says the pimpy croc is better.



There is something wonderfully wrong about this watch. The same kind of wrong as a 44 year old guy in a three piece tailored suit and hand-welted shoes driving a V8 Camaro. I am delighted with it.
post #6148 of 6369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wowee Zowee View Post

@DerangedGoose lovely watches. What is that classic gold dress watch? Is it in production?

 

These watches are not currently being produced, but were made in significant numbers. They are usually known by the movement code, which was the Luch 2209. However, this movement was shared across Raketa, Luch, Sekonda, Vympel, Poljot, and Vostok model lines. They were produced in chrome, gilt, and solid gold cases of many different dial combinations.

 

Here is a good resource on this famous movement to get you started:

 

http://www.2209watchmovement.com/

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thefastlife View Post


can anyone help with a specific model name on these?

 

The first watch is a Vostok Amphibia in the 710 model, also known as the ministry case. This specific dial and hands combo is usually seen on the Special Edition, or SE models. Meranom is the retailer for these:

 

http://meranom.com/amphibian-se/710se/

 

My personal recommendation is to get one of the standard edition models at half the price, and add the hands / bezel you want. I personally prefer no-date models to preserve symmetry, but both are available. Here is a watchuseek thread detailing some of the excellent mods available for these watches:

 

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f10/vostok-mods-1133714-196.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are several people out there making custom bezels for these watches that will take seiko or other inserts (custom hands and dials are available too) such as dr. seikostain, favinov, and pers, whose bezels I personally favor as they are totally machined and do not use inserts:

 

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f10/bezel-handmade-pers184-1176770.html

 

 

 

 

 

The second watch you asked about is the Sturmanskie reissue chronograph, a tasteful reissue of the famous soviet pilot chronograph. This is the black face model:

 

http://www.moscowwatch.com/index.php?productID=770

 

Grey is also available, and this retailer sells restored vintage chronographs for less than $300 in some cases (this is an excellent deal, but be aware that some of those particular watches may not be 100% historically accurate, as the military models used a stainless steel case, while the civilian models had chromed brass. Also, sometimes you will find a post-USSR movement in a CCCP marked watch, or a movement assembled from pieces ranging across dates. I personally dont bother with such details too much, as all of these watches will function to the same high degree mechanically, but its important to some people)

 

The sturmanskie line has now expanded to other, modern models as well. These are consistently the best deal you can get for mechanical handwinding chrongraphs finished to a high degree ($399 for the one below)

 

http://www.moscowwatch.com/index.php?productID=757

 

 

 

Explore the rest of their offerings; there are some very handsome watches out there.

 

Another good retailer is poljot24.de, run by Julian Kampmann:

 

http://www.poljot24.de/en/chronographen.html

 


Edited by DerangedGoose - 9/23/16 at 11:45am
post #6149 of 6369

Any ideas for straps/bracelets for a Seiko 5 military in black? My black NATO is falling apart.

 

I wear it mostly for casual and smart casual (chinos + shirt) occasions in tropical weather.

post #6150 of 6369

Crappy phone pic, but I am loving the new-to-me Longines:

 

 

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