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Sunglasses NOT owned by Luxottica - Page 5

post #61 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

I was going to say that those look really cheap in materials, appearance, and construction, but then I went to the site and saw that they really are cheap. They probably fill a niche for some buyers.

 

As a consumer, how informed are you about the construction of a product you've never owned personally?

 

Do you know the difference between polycarbonate and acetate? Do you know the density of the Polycarbonate we use?

 

Did you know our impact resistance tests show superiority to that of both Oakley's Frogskins (Acrylic) and Ray Ban's Wayfarers (Acetate or Polycarbonate)?

 

I highly suggest you own a product first, before consulting on it's quality... We've engineered our product to surpass the current marketplace's status quo and offer it at a more than reasonable price...

 

Thank you for you input though.

post #62 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightFuturesSG View Post
 

 

As a consumer, how informed are you about the construction of a product you've never owned personally?

 

Do you know the difference between polycarbonate and acetate? Do you know the density of the Polycarbonate we use?

 

Did you know our impact resistance tests show superiority to that of both Oakley's Frogskins (Acrylic) and Ray Ban's Wayfarers (Acetate or Polycarbonate)?

 

I highly suggest you own a product first, before consulting on it's quality... We've engineered our product to surpass the current marketplace's status quo and offer it at a more than reasonable price...

 

Thank you for you input though.

 

Actually I do know a bit about these materials. You seem to be mixing up frames and lenses, which are you referring to? Also, a few things you wrote are wrong or badly worded. Oakley uses a polycarbonate based material for its lenses, not acrylic, which the ANSI Z87.1 impact tests they use are designed to test. There are a few mil-spec tests that push lenses even further, which some Wiley-X glasses and Revision protective eyewear are designed to withstand. Ray-Ban mostly uses glass lenses, so no surprise that they aren't very impact resistant. Also, the Ray-Bans Wayfarers frames aren't made of real acetate. They used to be acetate, but now they use a material that has similar properties but can be injection-molded, so as to save costs.

 

In your pictures you mention that you have frames made of polycarbonate and lenses made of acrylic, which seems like an unusual choice. Do you mean the other way around? If your priority is impact resistance, polycarbonate would be a smarter choice for the lens since it has a higher fracture toughness.

 

In any case, I'll explain the quality I was referring to. To me, a quality pair of sunglasses should have wire core acetate frames, which allows for some adjustability and has a better quality feel to it than common plastics. I'm not so concerned with the impact resistance since I have specialized safety glasses for that. If the frames do have rivets, I'd want them to be real rivets, not fake ones that are heat-sunk into the frame. It is clear just from the pictures and the specs listed that your sunglasses are not the most high quality on the market. But like I said, that's acceptable given the lower price point. I'm not saying that your product is a terrible value, but you have to be realistic; it's just not comparable to the much more expensive frames out there.

post #63 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

 

Actually I do know a bit about these materials. You seem to be mixing up frames and lenses, which are you referring to? Also, a few things you wrote are wrong or badly worded. Oakley uses a polycarbonate based material for its lenses, not acrylic, which the ANSI Z87.1 impact tests they use are designed to test. There are a few mil-spec tests that push lenses even further, which some Wiley-X glasses and Revision protective eyewear are designed to withstand. Ray-Ban mostly uses glass lenses, so no surprise that they aren't very impact resistant. Also, the Ray-Bans Wayfarers frames aren't made of real acetate. They used to be acetate, but now they use a material that has similar properties but can be injection-molded, so as to save costs.

 

In your pictures you mention that you have frames made of polycarbonate and lenses made of acrylic, which seems like an unusual choice. Do you mean the other way around? If your priority is impact resistance, polycarbonate would be a smarter choice for the lens since it has a higher fracture toughness.

 

In any case, I'll explain the quality I was referring to. To me, a quality pair of sunglasses should have wire core acetate frames, which allows for some adjustability and has a better quality feel to it than common plastics. I'm not so concerned with the impact resistance since I have specialized safety glasses for that. If the frames do have rivets, I'd want them to be real rivets, not fake ones that are heat-sunk into the frame. It is clear just from the pictures and the specs listed that your sunglasses are not the most high quality on the market. But like I said, that's acceptable given the lower price point. I'm not saying that your product is a terrible value, but you have to be realistic; it's just not comparable to the much more expensive frames out there.

 

I was referring to the frame construction only...

 

Our frames are Polycarbonate.

 

What matter's most to us in our company in particular is the resistance of the frame to breakage due to normal wear and excessive usage as well. We want our customer to be able to beat the shades up and not worry about them breaking.

 

Acetate breaks when bent (Ray Ban Wayfarer), Acrylic fogs when bent and will lose shape when bent (Oakley Frogskins). Our Polycarbonate construction will bend with a large range of motion, and retain shape, without breaking or fogging... 

 

As for the lenses, yes, they are acrylic. We could offer PC lenses such as other brands, but the rigidity of our frame and quality of our 0.75mm Polarized Lenses, speak for themselves. We use Acrylic for our Wayfarer lenses to keep the cost of the product down on our core product. Our other frames (Aviator, Cruiser, Specatcle) all offer Polycarbonate Lenses, but they are all also a little higher in retail price...

 

I wouldn't pass judgement of a product, without seeing it in person, that is my main reason for replying to your post in the first place.


Thank you for your input.

post #64 of 73

I should be a little clearer about my intent. I was comparing your sunglasses to more expensive ones. If your sunglasses were in that price range, they would be lacking in materials and features compared to some of the better brands. There are quite a few brands that are lacking in the same way but cost three or four times what yours do. Since you are selling them for a lower price, the lower quality materials make sense. I really would not expect to see real acetate on a pair of sunglasses retailing for under $30. You're focusing on an unusual price niche, but I could see there being a market for it. I'd suggest that you lose the external branding and weird colors and go for more classic stuff. Maybe something like a lower priced alternative to Retrosuperfuture's concept. Good luck.

 

BTW, real acetate will not break when bent as you say. As I mentioned, Ray-Ban's Wayfarers don't use real acetate anymore, so their inferior material would be the cause of the breakages you've been hearing about. Real wire core acetate can be bent easily to suit the user, as seen below:

 

 

That's LGR's demonstration, but any good pair of frames made with real acetate can do this. I bend all of mine to suit me better.

post #65 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan24 View Post

Your suggestion of avoiding Luxottica and shopping at Walmart is completely oxymoronic why avoid one huge conglomerate and support another.

Also, there are tons of independent high end optical lines that don't utilize Chinese acetates contrary to your earlier posts, most of these lines use Italian Mazzuchelli acetates. I am including a short list to help you out wink.gif Also none of these lines are affiliated with Safilo, Marchon or Marcolin the other optical powerhouses, they are all independent.

Mykita
Mykita Mylon
Dita
Thom Browne
Orgreen
Bevel
Barton Perriera
Lindberg
Anne et Valentine
Theo
Face a Face
Oliver Goldsmith
Claire Goldsmith
Caroline Abram
Undostrial
Lucas de Stael
Masunaga
Zero G
Salt
Robert Marc
Lunor
Gold & Wood
Chrome Hearts
Linda Farrow
Cutler & Gross
FreudenHaus
Drift
LA Eyeworks
Lafont
Italee
Ic Berlin
Maybach
Activist Eyewear
Alexander Daas
Andy Wolf
Rapp
Cartier
David Yurman
Entourage of 7
Eye DC
Etnia Barcelona
Feb 31st
Francis Klein
Hoffman
JF Rey
Morgenthal Frederics
Kilsgaard
Leisure Society
Sama
Matsuda
Massada
PQ
Res/Rei
Theirry Lasry
Harry Lary
Traction
Tom Davies
Volte Face
Vue DC
Gotti
Rigards

And there are way more out there. Look a little deeper and seek an independent optical shop smile.gif



Tom ford
post #66 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuisquash View Post


Tom ford


Made by Marcolin last I checked.

post #67 of 73

Hi.  I see that someone had mentioned us here.  Thanks.  

 

We've got a small independent brand out of San Francisco.  We started Sutro when we realized that no one was making glasses with the same quality as frames we loved growing up, like old Persol's  and RayBan's with glass lenses (before Luxottica bought them), or early Varunet's. 

 

We use the finest glass lenses from Barberini in Italy, Japanese acetate and created our surgical stainless, 3Click™ hinge as an answer to most problems...hinge failure.   Pitch over... check out:

 

http://www.sutrovision.com

 

Tks

Sutro

post #68 of 73
I wonder who make's Cartier's frames?
post #69 of 73

Any knowledge on Chronicles of Never?

post #70 of 73

Something I did for glasses not specifically for sunglasses:

 

Luxottica (Ray-Ban/Oakley/Persol) - Italy

Brooks Brothers

Burberry ex Safilo

Bulgari

Chanel

Coach ex Marchon

Donna Karan ex Alain Mikli

DKNY

Dolce & Gabbana ex Marcolin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Aramni

Paul Smith

Polo Ralph Lauren ex Safilo

Prada

Stella McCartney ex Safilo

Tiffany & Co

Tory Burch

Versace

 

Safilo - Italy

Alexander McQueen

Banana Republic (USA only)

BOSS/BOSS Orange/HUGO

Bottega Veneta

Dior

Dior Homme

Fendi ex Marchon

Fossil

Gucci

JLo by Jennifer Lopez (USA only)

Jimmy Choo

Juicy Couture

Kate Spade

Liz Claiborne (USA only)

Marc Jacobs

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Max Mara

Max&Co

Pierre Cardin

Saks Fifth Avenue (USA only)

Tommy Hilfiger ex Viva

Saint Laurent Paris (YSL)

Bobbi Brown

 

Marchon Eyewear USA inc Scandinavian Eyewear

Calvin Klein

Chloe ex L'Amy ex Marcolin

Emilio Pucci

G-Star Raw

Jill Sander ex Alain Mikli

Karl Lagerfeld

Lacoste ex Charmant Group

Michael Kors

Nautica

Nine West ex Safilo/Stylemark

Salvatore Ferragamo ex Luxottica

Valentino ex Safilo

Nike

 

Charmant Group Japan

Elle

Espirit

Puma

Trussardi ex Visibilia

Daks (Asia)

Lanvin (Japan)

Nina Ricci (Japan)

 

Marcolin Italy inc Creative Optics Inc USA

Diesel ex Safilo

Roberto Cavalli

Timberland

Tom Ford

Balenciaga ex Safilo

Mont Blanc

Tod's

Kenneth Cole (USA only) ex ClearVision

Ermenegildo Zegna ex De Rigo 2015

Miss Sixty

North Face

Ferrari

John Galliano

 

Orama to Marcolin

Henry Cotton’s

 

Viva International Group USA to Marcolin

Gant

Guess

Marciano

Skechers

Harley Davidson

 

Viva Moda/De Rigo

Etro

Escada

Fila

Furla

Givenchy

Ermenegildo Zegna

 

 

De Rigo (Police) Spain

Blumarine ex Visibilia

Chopard

Fila

Lanvin ex Japan

Orla Kiely

Escada

Furla

Loewe

Carolina Herrera

Ermenegildo Zegna to leave

Givenchy

TOUS

Etro

La Perla

Jean Paul Gaultier ex Japan

 

Silhouette International Schmied AG

Adidas

 

Altair Eyewear

Joseph Abboud

Tommy Bahama

 

Kenmark

Vera Wang

Penguin

 

L'Amy America

Sperry Top-Sider

Balmain

Carven

Ann Taylor

Ted Lapidus

Ninna Ricci ex Japan

Columbia

Cerrutti ex Allison

Sonia Rykiel ex Alain Mikli

Nicole Miller

Kenzo

Rochas

 

REM Eyewear - USA

Converse

John Varvatos

Tumi

 

Tura (USA/Canada) Eschenbach

Bogner

Geoffrey Beene

Brendel

Ted Baker (with Hartmarx)

Lulu Guinness

 

Eschenbach Eyewear - Germany

Marc O'Polo

Bogner

Brendel

 

Allison - Italy

Benetton ex Nigura Metzler

Iceberg

Moschino

Replay ex Marcolin

Sisley

Vivienne Westwood

Missoni

Bikkembergs

Cerruti ex Nigura Metzler

Dunhill

Gianfranco Ferrè

Les Copains

John Richmond

Byblos

 

Colors In Optics USA

Azzaro

Elie Tahari

 

Rodenstock Germany

Dunhill ex Allison

Baldessarini

Porsche Design

Mercedes Benz ex Allison

 

 

 

Eyewear Designs – USA Walman

Bill Blass

Jill Stuart

Perry Ellis

Elizabeth Arden

Levi's

 

 

Nigura Metzler Germany ex Moulin Global Hong Kong

Cerrutti 1993-2003 2010-

Aston Martin

Reebok ex Stylemark

Benetton

Longines

Aigner

 

Aspex Eyewear

Greg Norman

BMW

 

 

Mondottica Hong Kong

Hackett London

Pepe Jeans

CB Sports

Christian Lacroix

Cacharel

Joules UK and Ire

Yohji Yamamoto

Ted Baker ex North America

Lulu Guinness ex North America

 

Inspecs UK

Radley

Austin Reed

Superdry

O'Neil

Animal

CAT

 

Alain Mikli France

 

Optec Japan

Paul Smith (Japan only)

 

Visibilia Germany ex Italy

Tom Tailor

Blumarine

Jeckerson

Laura Biagiotti

Mandarina Duck

Trussardi

Emanuel Ungaro

post #71 of 73

It really doesn't matter. Even private brands eventually sell to Luxottica and Luxottica always offers so much money that they can't refuse the offer. So just go with what you like and don't worry about big or small companies.

 

Eyewear Nerd

post #72 of 73


Mau Jim. They are by far the best sunglasses you'll ever own. They have a patent on double polarization, not only on one side but a coating on the outside and inside. With that said, it protects your eyes a lot more, reduces the glare even more than any other polarized sunglass. Their warranty is great, and stand behind their words. Theres a 2 year warranty on the lenses, so if anything, and I literally mean anything, happens to them they will replace the lenses for free within those 2 years. After the 2 years you just have to pay 30 dollars per lens to get it replaced while a polarized Oakley lens is 90 dollars. As with the frame, they have a lifetime warranty on them. So basically if anything happens to the frames, you can get it replaced for free for a lifetime. Another awesome thing about Maui Jim is that they are NOT owned by Luxottica. Maui Jim is one of the few brands that aren't owned by Luxottica. I have yet to see a Maui Jim return!!

-Sunglass professional   

post #73 of 73

Well, I'll be the dissenting opinion.

I love wearing my Maui Jim's. But the customer service, specifically in regards to warranty service, is awful.

I've NEVER been able to have them replace something under warranty.

I've had several pairs break while wearing them. (I bought one pair, liked it, bought two more, then the breakages started)

I had one lens shatter while it was in the case.

I had two pairs recently break at the location of the previous "repair".

Each time, they've charged me $60-120 to 'fix' the glasses.


I'm headed back to Luxottica. At least they don't pretend to have good customer service.

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