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Sunglasses NOT owned by Luxottica - Page 5

post #61 of 67

I was going to say that those look really cheap in materials, appearance, and construction, but then I went to the site and saw that they really are cheap. They probably fill a niche for some buyers.

post #62 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

I was going to say that those look really cheap in materials, appearance, and construction, but then I went to the site and saw that they really are cheap. They probably fill a niche for some buyers.

 

As a consumer, how informed are you about the construction of a product you've never owned personally?

 

Do you know the difference between polycarbonate and acetate? Do you know the density of the Polycarbonate we use?

 

Did you know our impact resistance tests show superiority to that of both Oakley's Frogskins (Acrylic) and Ray Ban's Wayfarers (Acetate or Polycarbonate)?

 

I highly suggest you own a product first, before consulting on it's quality... We've engineered our product to surpass the current marketplace's status quo and offer it at a more than reasonable price...

 

Thank you for you input though.

post #63 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightFuturesSG View Post
 

 

As a consumer, how informed are you about the construction of a product you've never owned personally?

 

Do you know the difference between polycarbonate and acetate? Do you know the density of the Polycarbonate we use?

 

Did you know our impact resistance tests show superiority to that of both Oakley's Frogskins (Acrylic) and Ray Ban's Wayfarers (Acetate or Polycarbonate)?

 

I highly suggest you own a product first, before consulting on it's quality... We've engineered our product to surpass the current marketplace's status quo and offer it at a more than reasonable price...

 

Thank you for you input though.

 

Actually I do know a bit about these materials. You seem to be mixing up frames and lenses, which are you referring to? Also, a few things you wrote are wrong or badly worded. Oakley uses a polycarbonate based material for its lenses, not acrylic, which the ANSI Z87.1 impact tests they use are designed to test. There are a few mil-spec tests that push lenses even further, which some Wiley-X glasses and Revision protective eyewear are designed to withstand. Ray-Ban mostly uses glass lenses, so no surprise that they aren't very impact resistant. Also, the Ray-Bans Wayfarers frames aren't made of real acetate. They used to be acetate, but now they use a material that has similar properties but can be injection-molded, so as to save costs.

 

In your pictures you mention that you have frames made of polycarbonate and lenses made of acrylic, which seems like an unusual choice. Do you mean the other way around? If your priority is impact resistance, polycarbonate would be a smarter choice for the lens since it has a higher fracture toughness.

 

In any case, I'll explain the quality I was referring to. To me, a quality pair of sunglasses should have wire core acetate frames, which allows for some adjustability and has a better quality feel to it than common plastics. I'm not so concerned with the impact resistance since I have specialized safety glasses for that. If the frames do have rivets, I'd want them to be real rivets, not fake ones that are heat-sunk into the frame. It is clear just from the pictures and the specs listed that your sunglasses are not the most high quality on the market. But like I said, that's acceptable given the lower price point. I'm not saying that your product is a terrible value, but you have to be realistic; it's just not comparable to the much more expensive frames out there.

post #64 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

 

Actually I do know a bit about these materials. You seem to be mixing up frames and lenses, which are you referring to? Also, a few things you wrote are wrong or badly worded. Oakley uses a polycarbonate based material for its lenses, not acrylic, which the ANSI Z87.1 impact tests they use are designed to test. There are a few mil-spec tests that push lenses even further, which some Wiley-X glasses and Revision protective eyewear are designed to withstand. Ray-Ban mostly uses glass lenses, so no surprise that they aren't very impact resistant. Also, the Ray-Bans Wayfarers frames aren't made of real acetate. They used to be acetate, but now they use a material that has similar properties but can be injection-molded, so as to save costs.

 

In your pictures you mention that you have frames made of polycarbonate and lenses made of acrylic, which seems like an unusual choice. Do you mean the other way around? If your priority is impact resistance, polycarbonate would be a smarter choice for the lens since it has a higher fracture toughness.

 

In any case, I'll explain the quality I was referring to. To me, a quality pair of sunglasses should have wire core acetate frames, which allows for some adjustability and has a better quality feel to it than common plastics. I'm not so concerned with the impact resistance since I have specialized safety glasses for that. If the frames do have rivets, I'd want them to be real rivets, not fake ones that are heat-sunk into the frame. It is clear just from the pictures and the specs listed that your sunglasses are not the most high quality on the market. But like I said, that's acceptable given the lower price point. I'm not saying that your product is a terrible value, but you have to be realistic; it's just not comparable to the much more expensive frames out there.

 

I was referring to the frame construction only...

 

Our frames are Polycarbonate.

 

What matter's most to us in our company in particular is the resistance of the frame to breakage due to normal wear and excessive usage as well. We want our customer to be able to beat the shades up and not worry about them breaking.

 

Acetate breaks when bent (Ray Ban Wayfarer), Acrylic fogs when bent and will lose shape when bent (Oakley Frogskins). Our Polycarbonate construction will bend with a large range of motion, and retain shape, without breaking or fogging... 

 

As for the lenses, yes, they are acrylic. We could offer PC lenses such as other brands, but the rigidity of our frame and quality of our 0.75mm Polarized Lenses, speak for themselves. We use Acrylic for our Wayfarer lenses to keep the cost of the product down on our core product. Our other frames (Aviator, Cruiser, Specatcle) all offer Polycarbonate Lenses, but they are all also a little higher in retail price...

 

I wouldn't pass judgement of a product, without seeing it in person, that is my main reason for replying to your post in the first place.


Thank you for your input.

post #65 of 67

I should be a little clearer about my intent. I was comparing your sunglasses to more expensive ones. If your sunglasses were in that price range, they would be lacking in materials and features compared to some of the better brands. There are quite a few brands that are lacking in the same way but cost three or four times what yours do. Since you are selling them for a lower price, the lower quality materials make sense. I really would not expect to see real acetate on a pair of sunglasses retailing for under $30. You're focusing on an unusual price niche, but I could see there being a market for it. I'd suggest that you lose the external branding and weird colors and go for more classic stuff. Maybe something like a lower priced alternative to Retrosuperfuture's concept. Good luck.

 

BTW, real acetate will not break when bent as you say. As I mentioned, Ray-Ban's Wayfarers don't use real acetate anymore, so their inferior material would be the cause of the breakages you've been hearing about. Real wire core acetate can be bent easily to suit the user, as seen below:

 

 

That's LGR's demonstration, but any good pair of frames made with real acetate can do this. I bend all of mine to suit me better.

post #66 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan24 View Post

Your suggestion of avoiding Luxottica and shopping at Walmart is completely oxymoronic why avoid one huge conglomerate and support another.

Also, there are tons of independent high end optical lines that don't utilize Chinese acetates contrary to your earlier posts, most of these lines use Italian Mazzuchelli acetates. I am including a short list to help you out wink.gif Also none of these lines are affiliated with Safilo, Marchon or Marcolin the other optical powerhouses, they are all independent.

Mykita
Mykita Mylon
Dita
Thom Browne
Orgreen
Bevel
Barton Perriera
Lindberg
Anne et Valentine
Theo
Face a Face
Oliver Goldsmith
Claire Goldsmith
Caroline Abram
Undostrial
Lucas de Stael
Masunaga
Zero G
Salt
Robert Marc
Lunor
Gold & Wood
Chrome Hearts
Linda Farrow
Cutler & Gross
FreudenHaus
Drift
LA Eyeworks
Lafont
Italee
Ic Berlin
Maybach
Activist Eyewear
Alexander Daas
Andy Wolf
Rapp
Cartier
David Yurman
Entourage of 7
Eye DC
Etnia Barcelona
Feb 31st
Francis Klein
Hoffman
JF Rey
Morgenthal Frederics
Kilsgaard
Leisure Society
Sama
Matsuda
Massada
PQ
Res/Rei
Theirry Lasry
Harry Lary
Traction
Tom Davies
Volte Face
Vue DC
Gotti
Rigards

And there are way more out there. Look a little deeper and seek an independent optical shop smile.gif



Tom ford
post #67 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuisquash View Post


Tom ford


Made by Marcolin last I checked.

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