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2016 MLB Season Thread - Page 226

post #3376 of 5143
And he done it wong! rimshot.gif
post #3377 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

Lol. Kolten Wong. You had one job.
If Charlie Finley owned this team he would have zero jobs tomorrow.
post #3378 of 5143
How do you get picked off to end a WS game when you'll never ever be stealing anyway? And with your one job being to pinch run?

The look on Beltran's face was priceless. You could read it in 160 pt font: You. mother. fucker

I like this guy Uehara. He's not just lights out, but seems to play really smart and has a good personality too
post #3379 of 5143
HO Li Fuk.
post #3380 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Another shocking finish. What a series.

most definitely!

Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

How do you get picked off to end a WS game when you'll never ever be stealing anyway? And with your one job being to pinch run?

The look on Beltran's face was priceless. You could read it in 160 pt font: You. mother. fucker

I like this guy Uehara. He's not just lights out, but seems to play really smart and has a good personality too

terrible, terrible base running... no situational thinking at all.

I'm really liking Uehara as well. nod[1].gif
post #3381 of 5143


So, Brad Ausmus, former Tigers catcher, is one of the candidates to be interviewed for the manager job. Here, from a game in 1999, we see that Brad knows how to argue with an umpire. Another prerequisite to put on his resume.

The Red Sox and Cardinals are making this World Series edge-of-your-seat games. All that RED!
post #3382 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

How do you get picked off to end a WS game when you'll never ever be stealing anyway? And with your one job being to pinch run?

The look on Beltran's face was priceless. You could read it in 160 pt font: You. mother. fucker

I like this guy Uehara. He's not just lights out, but seems to play really smart and has a good personality too

Why even take a lead off first base in this situation? Down by two runs with two outs, you're not stealing second base to get into scoring position, and you're running on contact. My only thought is that a lead can keep the first baseman on the bag and open up the right side of the infield, but it's just not worth the risk as the Cardinals discovered.
post #3383 of 5143
it was just poor decision making/base running coupled with an absolutely perfect pick off throw.
post #3384 of 5143

Jonny Gomes... what a joke.

post #3385 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

Why even take a lead off first base in this situation? Down by two runs with two outs, you're not stealing second base to get into scoring position, and you're running on contact. My only thought is that a lead can keep the first baseman on the bag and open up the right side of the infield, but it's just not worth the risk as the Cardinals discovered.


Wong wasn't that far off the bag. What did happen is that he made a little hop trying to get back to first - and his feet slid out a little under him.

there was one of those sport science videos that shows in pressure playoffs situations your muscles tense up 13% more than usual, this might have happened to wong and resulted in the slip.
post #3386 of 5143
he should have been on the bag, or close enough that he could just step back. that was his mistake. and to his chagrin, uehara's throw was just perfectly timed.
post #3387 of 5143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

I'm sure the Cards take great comfort from all the statistical analyses saying there's no such thing as a clutch hitter ...

No the analyses just say there is no way to prove that there is such a thing as "clutch hitting." That is absolutely true. People also go "well he got a big hit late in the game with a close score, that means he's clutch" but not really. Most people assign "clutch" skills after the fact and they discount that there are high leverage situations at any and every part of the game, its just people fallaciously assume that later in the game means more important.

With that said, I think some baseball players, just like everybody else, respond well to pressure. There's just no way to prove that someone does better in a high leverage at bat, pitch or play.
post #3388 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

No the analyses just say there is no way to prove that there is such a thing as "clutch hitting." That is absolutely true. People also go "well he got a big hit late in the game with a close score, that means he's clutch" but not really. Most people assign "clutch" skills after the fact and they discount that there are high leverage situations at any and every part of the game, its just people fallaciously assume that later in the game means more important.

With that said, I think some baseball players, just like everybody else, respond well to pressure. There's just no way to prove that someone does better in a high leverage at bat, pitch or play.

Not to quibble over semantics, but I think what the analyses show is that the evidence does not support the notion that there are such things as "clutch hitters". I agree that's not quite the same thing as proving a negative, but it's one of those areas where if you accept the validity of the analysis and working definitions the lack of evidence to support the positive is a pretty persuasive argument for the negative.

I think a greatly oversimplified version of the studies that have been done is: looking at various players over the courses of their careers and their performance in "clutch" situations (as defined by the analysts, of course), there's no evidence that anybody performs consistently (statistically speaking, anyway) better in those situations.


http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=2656


I will say that it's a slippery enough concept that I'm not sure how well it lends itself to statistical analysis -- and I don't really accept the conclusion. But I do think the conclusion (again, if one simply accepts the analysis on its own terms) suggests that the concept of clutch hitting is something of a canard, not just that there's no way tell.
post #3389 of 5143
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

he should have been on the bag, or close enough that he could just step back. that was his mistake. and to his chagrin, uehara's throw was just perfectly timed.

I found it funny that moments before the announcers had been sharply criticizing the Red Sox for having Napoli hold the runner at first (thereby leaving a hole on the right side of the infield) rather than just conceding the steal and playing the infielders straight-away, but conveniently forgot that fact after the pick-off.
post #3390 of 5143

I hate when analysts point to AVG w/ RISP as an indication of "clutch" hitting. It stands to reason that if a pitcher has let runners into scoring position then averages will be higher.

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