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post #8716 of 11161
Whoops, you're right. SPSS. shog[1].gif That's what I used.

Yes, very familiar with Epic.
post #8717 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

alien.gif

but if you go by some analysts, it's time to panic and have a flash sale
http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/12/sell-everything-ahead-of-stock-market-crash-say-rbs-economists

i assume if you can afford to weather the storm it'll be good to hold on. larger firms will be fleecing folks and buying cheap on the dollar

That's my assumption as well. I dont mind holding, thats my plan. I'd like to lower my averages, but I also dont want these positions to continue ballooning. I've chased the falling knife this far....
post #8718 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

but R is taking over in teaching academic settings (SAS costs $$$$$, R is free). Stata's still big, although I don't foresee them holding on unless they make some changes, especially in the "big data" future.
R is a cool project...but a shitty programming language. It can do a lot and has a great community, but as someone who is familiar with other languages, R always bothers me (though I can't claim to be an expert, I am primarily a SAS user).

R is just derived from S+ . I know Python is gaining lot of traction, especially in the sciences. The number of packages being developed impressive. And with the ability to compile in some other languages (C++, for example, or Fortran which I think is the backbone to the SciPy diff eq solvers) speed is not bad. And you don't have to fork out for something like a MATLAB license. R is probably still preferred, marginally so, for stats. In either case, hooray open source :-)
post #8719 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Yes, very familiar with Epic.

Are they as shitty as I think they are?

I interviewed with them once, and it was the only time I ever got a "Holy shit, I need to get out of here" feeling. Unfortunately, it was done through "On Campus Recruiting" which means I had to follow through with the parts of the process that had already been scheduled (or lose access to further recruiting options).

Sounded like an absolutely terrible job. Weird family run company with completely arbitrary and nepotistic practicies. A penchant for locking H1B visa seekers into terrible working conditions. Work that involves supporting/implementing/improving software that is known to be absolute shit.
post #8720 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

R is just derived from S+ . I know Python is gaining lot of traction, especially in the sciences. The number of packages being developed impressive. And with the ability to compile in some other languages (C++, for example, or Fortran which I think is the backbone to the SciPy diff eq solvers) speed is not bad. And you don't have to fork out for something like a MATLAB license. R is probably still preferred, marginally so, for stats. In either case, hooray open source :-)

Yeah, I think that's the problem. They rebuilt S/S+ in open source because people already knew it and were working with it...but S was not exactly a stellar language to start with. R is filled with clunky/inconsistent syntax, and all sorts of goofy shit. But it also has a lot of solid statistical libraries and is easily extendable. Its graphing libraries are fucking magic compared to SAS/Stata.

I love python, although it is not well suited to handling large datasets on its own--luckily there has been a lot of improvement with things like SciPy, NumPy, pandas, and people straight-up porting over R's charting tools into python.

SAS is weird and antiquated, but I actually quite like it. It is very good at doing the things it is built to do, and can happily chug through giant datasets without extensive optimization or building a computer with a shit ton of RAM. If you have to start using the SAS macro language to create your own custom stats functions, you'll quickly wish you had something else, but if most of your work is "get data, clean data, compute statistics/regressions, output a table"...SAS really does pretty well.
post #8721 of 11161
post #8722 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Are they as shitty as I think they are?

I interviewed with them once, and it was the only time I ever got a "Holy shit, I need to get out of here" feeling. Unfortunately, it was done through "On Campus Recruiting" which means I had to follow through with the parts of the process that had already been scheduled (or lose access to further recruiting options).

Sounded like an absolutely terrible job. Weird family run company with completely arbitrary and nepotistic practicies. A penchant for locking H1B visa seekers into terrible working conditions. Work that involves supporting/implementing/improving software that is known to be absolute shit.

Let's just say that in healthcare, at the very least, you want to make sure your enterprise package is compatible with Epic. They really control an unreal portion of the market (not researched that just based on what I've observed), and with sharing of medical info these days, it's just easier if your software will talk to Epic. They also seem to have a module for everything.
post #8723 of 11161
I knew two folks working there, at least one has really enjoyed it. Seems they follow the Google trend of making their campus a fun place, etc
post #8724 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post


Are they as shitty as I think they are?

I interviewed with them once, and it was the only time I ever got a "Holy shit, I need to get out of here" feeling. Unfortunately, it was done through "On Campus Recruiting" which means I had to follow through with the parts of the process that had already been scheduled (or lose access to further recruiting options).

Sounded like an absolutely terrible job. Weird family run company with completely arbitrary and nepotistic practicies. A penchant for locking H1B visa seekers into terrible working conditions. Work that involves supporting/implementing/improving software that is known to be absolute shit.

 

I have some experience because I went to UW and they are a huge recruiter there.  I have friends who hated it and friends who loved it.  One of my friends actually just went over there about a year ago, and they gave him a crazy huge raise - almost 100% plus a signing bonus equal to like 25% of what he was making.  He was in reality super underpaid, and they just brought him up to market rates.

 

The weirdest practice they have there, to me, is they hire a lot of non-CS background people to be programmers and teach them programming because they use a proprietary coding language and can hire people without a coding background cheaper.  My understanding is that is changing though.

 

The biggest benefit to working their I saw was after 2-3 years of experience you could become an Epic consultant and make huge money.

 

To your point overall, it seemed like a really bad company to work for and seemed poorly run from the outside, but they do, to Pio's point, have a huge market share, so at least at one point they did something right.

post #8725 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Let's just say that in healthcare, at the very least, you want to make sure your enterprise package is compatible with Epic. They really control an unreal portion of the market (not researched that just based on what I've observed), and with sharing of medical info these days, it's just easier if your software will talk to Epic. They also seem to have a module for everything.

 

As a healthcare guy as well, Epic leads the industry in that are.  I think it will be easier once Meaningful Use level 3 is in place which from my understanding means every system will need to be able to talk to each other.

post #8726 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I have some experience because I went to UW and they are a huge recruiter there.  I have friends who hated it and friends who loved it.  One of my friends actually just went over there about a year ago, and they gave him a crazy huge raise - almost 100% plus a signing bonus equal to like 25% of what he was making.  He was in reality super underpaid, and they just brought him up to market rates.

The weirdest practice they have there, to me, is they hire a lot of non-CS background people to be programmers and teach them programming because they use a proprietary coding language and can hire people without a coding background cheaper.  My understanding is that is changing though.

The biggest benefit to working their I saw was after 2-3 years of experience you could become an Epic consultant and make huge money.

To your point overall, it seemed like a really bad company to work for and seemed poorly run from the outside, but they do, to Pio's point, have a huge market share, so at least at one point they did something right.

Someone from my program worked there for 2 years before bschool and wasn't too fond of it. He finished my program early and is making like 170 base for some small firm out of Texas.
post #8727 of 11161
Holy oil
post #8728 of 11161
Yeah, it was my understanding that much like SAP, where Epic exists, it runs everything, and if you can't interface with it, you are in trouble.

And much like SAP where implemenations can get crazy out of control and require expensive special consultants, Epic is a weird behemoth product. Created heavily by people who never studied software design and made to function to client demands through sheer brute force.

The guy I knew who worked there made it a year before coming to my company. Now he is at a healthcare analytics/consulting company (but not dealing with Epic that I know). From what I understand, Epic is fairly aggressive in making sure you don't quit them to go work for someone else. It may be hard to enforce the non-compete they make you sign (as with most non-competes)...but I heard that they also try and get customers to sign agreements saying they won't ever hire Epic employees to come in house.
Contrast that to a lot of other companies that will actually help junior staff transition in-house/into industry when it is time to move on.
post #8729 of 11161
Jesus this pain seems to never end. I mean even my Canadian index, like the entire market is down 3-4% in a single day. So many companies down hard wow.
post #8730 of 11161
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

That's my assumption as well. I dont mind holding, thats my plan. I'd like to lower my averages, but I also dont want these positions to continue ballooning. I've chased the falling knife this far....

My friends in finance keep saying that we made it through 2008 and we're still vertical. Granted, I was 25 back then and I'm not exactly getting younger. I'm not planning to add to TSLA or change anything in how my non-fun money is managed. I'd prolly suggest more duh things like fixed yield stuff, but I'm assuming that's going to be the de-facto case anyway. I have a meeting with the local office on Monday - my lazy ass's first since moving to California, so we'll see what they say.
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