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Lets talk Homemade Pizza - Page 6

post #76 of 96
knocked these up tonight. left is tomato base, cheddar cheese, panchetta, red onions, rocket & a drizzle of olive oil. right is tomato base, cheddar cheese, ham, semi-dried tomato, mushrooms & basil leaves that were put on the pizza a bit to early.
post #77 of 96
Not the biggest fan of cheddar cheese on pizza, unless it's some kind of "cheeseburger" pizza. Even then I feel it needs to be mixed with some Mozzarella.
post #78 of 96
was just making do with what i had. usually i opt for the mozarella.
post #79 of 96
As to dough, I've had good luck with the Cuisinart dough recipe, which is here. It will freeze, but it isn't anywhere near as good after a freeze. Loses a lot of elasticity. A pro to this recipe is that it only takes one rise, and you can be ready to bake in an hour. There was also a recipe in Cook's a few issues back that was the low yeast, slow rise method. I've had mixed results with that one, I'm trying again tonight. But I can wholeheartedly endorse the high heat, preheat stone, bake high in the oven method.
post #80 of 96
I'd definitely go with Alton Brown's dough recipe. The man is a culinary genius. As for toppings, I prefer a simple Margherita or with some sun-dried tomatoes for a nice kick.
post #81 of 96
the last time i made pizza I was in a hurry. I used thickly-sliced mozzarella and sandwich pepperoni from from the deli...it was quick and easy - and worked out well
post #82 of 96
Had my favorite pizza I always make at home last night. Just red onion, caper, and mozz. When done put fresh rosemary, garlic, and oregano on it. Only had dried oregano unfortunately.

Put oven on 500F, about 6 minutes on a pizza stone.
post #83 of 96
Made grilled pizza over the weekend. Trader joes dough, fresh mozz, basil, tomato, olive oil, little crushed red pepper and a little proscuitto. it was wonderful.

The crust was great - crisp but with some chew. The mozz was a bit too watery though. I think I'd lay it on a towel after slicing to get some of the moisture out.
post #84 of 96
Wanted to thank this thread for suggesting using unglazed tiles and leading me to seriouseat recipes:

232

232

Got some air bubbles:

232
post #85 of 96
Bumping this because I suck and need help. How the hell do I form pizzas so I get a good cornicione? I made the dough using Matt's recipe, risen overnight in the fridge and rested it for 2 hours before forming the pie. First off I when I used 500 grams of 00 flour as specified, the dough was sticking to my hands and the counter and was impossible to knead, so I had to add a few more tablespoons to even get it workable. Then when I tried forming it it couldn't stretch thin without ripping, so the only option was to use a rolling pin and re-form a bit of crust afterwards. I cooked it in a wood fired oven which cooked the middle to pretty close to what it should be, but the crust stayed cracker thin with no rise at all and it took way too long to cook. It actually worked better in a regular oven on broil the first time I made it, but still the crust stayed pretty thin. I'm sure I'm doing plenty of things wrong, but can anyone help me figure out what to change for next time?

On a similar note, has anyone ever taken a class at PIzza a Casa in NYC? They're getting great reviews, but I've never been one to trust anonymous reviews like that.
post #86 of 96
you have to be patient when you're stretching the dough. you also might not have kneaded the dough enough

tbh i think a rolling pin is perfectly fine
post #87 of 96
It didn't seem to be an issue with patience, it just wasn't stretching without ripping period. Could that have been too much flour or something? Normally I'd be fine with a rolling pin, but I'm trying to make authentic VPN style Neopolitan pizza, and rolling pins are expressly forbidden. I also don't think they allow for the crust to puff up as much as I'd like. This is an example of what I'm trying to do. 350
post #88 of 96
sorry im not a big neopolitan pizza nerd, but it seems to me something is wrong with the yeast. not enough? maybe you added the salt too early (can hamper or kill off growth)?

did you weigh everything else out too?

where'd you get a wood fired oven in nyc to use?
post #89 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexg View Post

Bumping this because I suck and need help. How the hell do I form pizzas so I get a good cornicione? I made the dough using Matt's recipe, risen overnight in the fridge and rested it for 2 hours before forming the pie. First off I when I used 500 grams of 00 flour as specified, the dough was sticking to my hands and the counter and was impossible to knead, so I had to add a few more tablespoons to even get it workable. Then when I tried forming it it couldn't stretch thin without ripping, so the only option was to use a rolling pin and re-form a bit of crust afterwards. I cooked it in a wood fired oven which cooked the middle to pretty close to what it should be, but the crust stayed cracker thin with no rise at all and it took way too long to cook. It actually worked better in a regular oven on broil the first time I made it, but still the crust stayed pretty thin. I'm sure I'm doing plenty of things wrong, but can anyone help me figure out what to change for next time?
On a similar note, has anyone ever taken a class at PIzza a Casa in NYC? They're getting great reviews, but I've never been one to trust anonymous reviews like that.

I think you may be over thnking everything.

Make pizza. Then make more pizza. I've made so many mistakes I couldn't count them all. But I make damn good pizza today...
post #90 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

sorry im not a big neopolitan pizza nerd, but it seems to me something is wrong with the yeast. not enough? maybe you added the salt too early (can hamper or kill off growth)?
did you weigh everything else out too?
where'd you get a wood fired oven in nyc to use?
I was leaning towards a yeast issue, but it foamed up in water and rose to about twice the size at room temperature, then doubled again when I put it in the fridge. The oven isn't in NYC, a friend on Long Island owns a pizzeria. Of course, getting the employees to understand that I was trying to make a different style of pizza from what they make there and didn't need help was another issue. It's hard disagreeing with professional pizza chefs about pizza making, but I'm unsure of the accuracy of the proclamation that "you can never add too much flour."
Quote:
Originally Posted by spence View Post

I think you may be over thnking everything.
Make pizza. Then make more pizza. I've made so many mistakes I couldn't count them all. But I make damn good pizza today...

I can make regular, decent pizza. The pizzas I made today could give most pizzerias in America a run for their money, but I'm trying to figure out how to make perfect Neopolitan pizza which is proving way harder than it seems.
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