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GQ: How to Buy A Suit

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
For the uninitiated, i think this basic guide by gq pretty much covers it.


1. Beware of the sales guy

He'll tell you whatever you want to hear"”that everything looks great on you, that the store's tailor can fix any suit. And you can almost be guaranteed his sense of style will be different from yours. For all these reasons, you need to know as much as possible about how a suit should fit and what kind of suit you're looking for before you walk through the door. Remember, you're the boss, not him.

2. Know why you're buying a suit

Are you hunting for a suit that you're going to wear to the office once or more a week? (If so, keep it dark and classic.) Or are you looking for a suit you'll wear a few times a year to weddings and funerals? (Black or navy is a safe bet.) Is it a suit you'll wear to job interviews? (If so, you want to be well dressed but not better dressed than the guy interviewing you, so nothing too pricey.) Or is it the kind you'd wear with sneakers and a T-shirt, or wear just the jacket with a pair of jeans? (Think designer, not Brooks Brothers or Hickey Freeman.

3. Start at a department store

When you're ready to start shopping, grab a friend who won't hesitate to provide you with a blunt opinion, and head to a store like Barneys or Saks or Bloomingdale's. You'll be able to view a variety of brands instead of just one. Once you're inside, do a lap of the suit floor by yourself. See what styles are carried"”what grabs your attention. Look at prices. Ask for a salesman when you're good and ready.

4. Know your size

It sounds obvious, but it's not. The most crucial element of a suit is its fit, and not many sales guys understand how a suit should fit or, more specifically, how you want yours to fit. Before you step into a dressing room, get a handle on the various components of a suit...

Shoulders:

The suit's shoulders should hug yours; shoulder pads should not protrude beyond your own shoulders. If you stand sideways against a wall and the shoulder pad touches the wall before your arm does, the suit is too big.

Chest:

You should be able to easily button the jacket without it straining. Conversely, there shouldn't be too much space between the button and your chest"”no more than a fist's worth.

Length:

When your arms are hanging straight down, you should be able to cup your fingers under the sides of your suit jacket. However, these days, with shorter suits in style, some jackets reach only about an inch beyond the cuff of your suit sleeve.

5. Start thinking about the number of buttons

Now you need to think about the style of the suit itself. The first thing you need to consider is the number of buttons on the suit. This will determine a good deal about the cut and fit. Here are some basic pointers:

"¢ The three-button suit (left) became the dominant look in the 1990s; it now seems to be the standard young man's choice. Instead of opting for one of those high-cut versions, look for one with a roll-over lapel"”one in which you button the middle button, encouraging the soft lapel to roll over the top button

"¢ For years the two-button suit was the go-to conservative, Capitol Hill getup. Now every fashion label imaginable is designing two-button suits, except they're making them more streamlined and modern. This cut is what's most in style right now.

"¢ If you're looking for something rakish, a bit more high-style, try a one-button suit. It's not for everyone, but if you can pull it off, it's a sleek look.

6. Think about the vents on the back of the suit jacket...

"¢ A center vent is all-purpose; it is both modern and traditional. You can't go wrong.

"¢ Side vents (left) are more European; a bit more suave.

"¢ A ventless jacket is just plain wrong. It says you think it's still 1986.

7. ...and the type of lapel

"¢ A notch lapel"”what you see on most business suits"”is the standard. You're always safe with a notch lapel.

"¢ A peak lapel (left) is more old-school and elegant. And now it's enjoying a comeback with the high-fashion crowd. It makes a statement.

8. Now head to the dressing room

If you're not wearing a dress shirt and dress shoes, ask for them; a good store should be able to hook you up. Then, find the three-way mirror and size up your suit. And not just the jacket. Consider the pants, too: They should be comfortable, and the rise (where the pants sit on your waist) shouldn't be too high or too low for your taste. If you don't think the pants fit right, try on another suit.

9. Know what a tailor can"”and can't"”do for you

Here are the areas you should direct your tailor's attention to:

"¢ Shoulders: If your suit doesn't fit in the shoulders, it's not going to fit anywhere else. Salesmen will tell you they can reduce or reshape the shoulder pads"”don't listen to them.

"¢ Pants: If the pants are an inch or so too tight or too large in the waist, a tailor can usually fix them. But if it's more than an inch, you're asking for trouble.

"¢ Jacket: A tailor usually will need to alter the length of the sleeves. Insist that you'd like a quarter inch of shirt cuff to show. The sides of a jacket often need tapering so they contour to your torso. And check out the collar: Many times there is a roll in the back of the suit jacket, up near your neck. A good tailor can correct this.

10. Pick it up

When you return to get your suit after it's been altered, always try it on again. Often, it will need another tweak or two so it fits as perfectly as you want it to. Congratulations, you've bought a suit.
post #2 of 42
Quote:
"¢ A ventless jacket is just plain wrong. It says you think it's still 1986.

I didn`t know that
post #3 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon
I didn`t know that

i must say, i didn't agree with that part.
post #4 of 42
Some of the advice is decent, but since it's from GQ, some of the advice is of course to be avoided.

By the by, I picked up this issue at the grocery store last month, and it does have some decent articles - including a great one on badass Clive Owen (who is featured on the cover).
post #5 of 42
I can't believe it, but I think I actually agree with all of this. I hate ventless suits.
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by dusty
I can't believe it, but I think I actually agree with all of this. I hate ventless suits.

While I love double vents, I still think ventless presents a better profile view than a single vented suit.
post #7 of 42
DBs look fine without vents. Half of the advice was rubbish, I have to say. Also, the example suits were pretty uninspired.
post #8 of 42
I just find the vented, either single or double, feel better when stuck in a meeting that one has not had the chance to remove ones jacket. Upon the actuall walking in or standing around I find little difference, though most of my preffered suits are vented.
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by VersaceMan
While I love double vents, I still think ventless presents a better profile view than a single vented suit.

It depends on how far back your butt goes. I don't think you'll see many NFL running backs in OTR ventless.
post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Canuker
I just find the vented, either single or double, feel better when stuck in a meeting that one has not had the chance to remove ones jacket. Upon the actuall walking in or standing around I find little difference, though most of my preffered suits are vented.

My reasons to dislike ventless jackets are aesthetic and not functional. For me, the ventless back forces an unnatural continuity that is incongruous with the front of the jacket.
post #11 of 42
No mention of double-breasted suits GQ......
post #12 of 42
GQ advice seems an excellent way to start.
post #13 of 42
When a ventless jacket is part of a well-constructed Italian-designed suit it can look good. I think the trouble comes with too many cheap American jobbers where they are ventless just for the sake of keeping the detail work to a minimum.
post #14 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan

Half of the advice was rubbish, I have to say. Also, the example suits were pretty uninspired.

for someone not familiar with purchasing an otr suit, and doesnt seem to know the difference between one from banana republic and from brooks brothers, this is a good starting point. i have to disagree with your opinion.
post #15 of 42
What I meant was more like... they had little to no advice whatsoever for body types, as if everyone who read GQ was a 36-40 chest and 5'11. Also, there's no examples at all of double breasteds or anything non-fashiony. So while it may be a good STARTING point, it's not all that helpful beyond, "This looks more daring/Euro/etc." Hope this cleared up what I meant. Again, I'll respectfully disagree with the ventless jackets... most double breasteds have traditionally been, and still are ventless from what I know. Also, Cary Grant pulled off a single breasted three-roll-two jacket without vent quite well in North By Northwest. As far as I'm concerned, it still holds up fine today.
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