or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Archives › Styleforum Frontpage › NEW S.N.S. Herning Fall/Winter 2011
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

NEW S.N.S. Herning Fall/Winter 2011

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Words by Pete Anderson Photos by Albert Thomas

 

Some of the lines showing during market week--not naming names--seemed to spread themselves a little thin. It takes moxy to start up a company that, just a season or two in, offers shirting, knitwear, outerwear, shoes, and accessories, and a decent amount of luck to pull it off. S.N.S. Herning, on the other hand, has an 80-year head start in the knit business and a preference for depth rather than breadth. The fall 2011 collection updates many of the line’s resurrected knitwear designs and threads in some new twists in texture and cut.

Idea for next S.N.S. Herning campaign theme: tradenMARK. Get it?

 

S.N.S. still draws heavily on its past as a large knitwear manufacturer in Denmark. They've titled the fall 2011 season GENERATI80N, marking the 80th anniversary of the S.N.S. Herning trademark. First registered, doing a little math here, in 1931. (Don’t try to pronounce GENERATI80N; you get the point.) The brand has seen its ups and downs in those eight decades, but appears to be cresting again, with a number of worldwide stockists and large buys last fall that saw its traditional knit sweaters popping up all over the place. The all-wool knits for next fall have a little more variation than those we saw at Capsule last January. Rather than all of them having a crisp hand, some knits are fuzzier, and some much softer and lighter--S.N.S. is using merino wool in some of their pieces. Still present are the striped nautical sweaters and fisherman’s turtlenecks, but the bubble knit on the turtlenecks has been adapted into other sweaters, including the Amalgam, “striped” with three-dimensional bubbles across the body and arms, and available as a crewneck or cardigan. Also, while many sweaters are still made with traditionally attached sleeves (with the armhole and sleeve cut straight down, often leading to a slightly dropped shoulder when worn), others will be made with an arguably more flattering set-in sleeve. Other, more landlocked influences have also been inspirational for S.N.S. Herning designers. A henley crossed with thick bands of fabric was modeled on a Danish prison guard uniform. A favorite among the Styleforum crew was an airier waffle knit piece that’s related to military sweaters. In dark gray it’s got wearability but enough textural interest to complement good denim or even workplace gear.

Amalgam cardigan in navy

Amalgan crewneck in mottled black

Boatneck detail on a merino piece

Many pieces for next fall have a looser, open weave

Rust color

Prison guard henley

 

Always ahead of the color game, S.N.S. Herning will be offering knits next fall in the usual navy and black but also a mottled black, a rustier red than last year, and a rich camel. That material matched particularly well with a sweater that updates an old S.N.S. body shape by adding a hood. Rumors of the hoodie's demise have been greatly exaggerated. S.N.S. Herning has taken some heat for the fact that, although all of their fabric is knitted in Denmark, the pieces are sewn in other countries. Their explanation is that Denmark simply doesn’t have the garment industry it once did, and getting them sewn domestically was not possible. Although the explanation seems reasonable, it casts a slight shadow on their marketing as a strictly traditional maker. Anecdotally, I know many satisfied S.N.S. wearers and although many were surprised to hear their sweaters were sewn in Latvia--there's not obvious quality deficiency--few were upset. The theme of outsourcing, reasons for it, and the decline of domestic production in many countries was a big theme this year at market week and it will be in Styleforum Frontpage's coverage. See also our upcoming features on Martin Greenfield, who makes suits in NY, and Leffot, which makes a point of carrying only shoe lines that make their own shoes.

 

S.N.S. Herning can be purchased from Four Horsemen, Roden Gray, Tres Bien Shop, bows + arrows, and Art in the Age.

post #2 of 25
Great write up and pictures. The crewneck looks really good
post #3 of 25
Nice article.

What's the one behind the striped boatneck? Shawl collar sweater/cardigan?
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Nice article.

What's the one behind the striped boatneck? Shawl collar sweater/cardigan?

It looks my Marked cardi
post #5 of 25
I'm fairly sure that they have been put together in Latvia for a long time (at least as long most of you guys - Americans and people outside Denmark - have known about SNS), but it hasn't said so on the tag until this season. They have probably been too lazy to have some new tags made and I think they had to follow some legislation regarding country of manufacture.

I think they could have them sewn in Denmark, but that would most likely increase the price drastically and it wouldn't be easy because of the limited availability of sewers and maschinery.

However a rather new Danish brand, Andersen&Andersen.com (brand - not maker and yes, I think the .com is part of the name) of a similar type of knit, told me that the knits are 100% Danish made - not that it matters to any of you guys.

http://www.andersen-andersen.com/

I am also fairly certain that I know a couple of knitters that could knit and sew in Denmark too, so in conclusion their excuse is probably not valid. But keep in mind they make a quality product at a reasonable price and on top they are really friendly.
post #6 of 25
It looks like Andersen only makes one kind of sweater in different collors while SNS has an entire collection. It's not just about cost because I'm sure logistically that it makes a huge difference in terms of sewers, lead times, etc. I've been told by my Danish friends who work in retail, one of whom is a buyer, just how hard having a truly Danish brand can be, almost to the point of being practically impossible. It makes sense that brands like SNS, Norse Projects, Han Kjobenhavn, or smaller ones like Minimum, have to outsource production even if only a percentage to stay competitive in this market.
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
It looks my Marked cardi

Really? This one looks like a tight knit in the body without the large patterns of the Marked
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post
Many pieces for next fall have a looser, open weave .
good news. i will probably pick up the rust one
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
It looks like Andersen only makes one kind of sweater in different collors while SNS has an entire collection. It's not just about cost because I'm sure logistically that it makes a huge difference in terms of sewers, lead times, etc. I've been told by my Danish friends who work in retail, one of whom is a buyer, just how hard having a truly Danish brand can be, almost to the point of being practically impossible. It makes sense that brands like SNS, Norse Projects, Han Kjobenhavn, or smaller ones like Minimum, have to outsource production even if only a percentage to stay competitive in this market.

You have a valid point. That is for sure. But if they had a factory of their own, that wouldn't be such a problem.
The only problem is that nobody is interested in Danish production and nobody wants to pay the prices that a Danish made product would require. Another problem is that the factories that still exist are really hard to find. I know way more than the average buyer/shop keeper in Denmark and I'm still learning about new makers ever so often. If they ever bothered doing some investigation they could do a lot here, locally.

Thing about Norse is, they are not an independent brand - they are part of California Sports, so they do not have any interest in producing somewhere else than China. Han Kjobenhavn is mostly China too, but I don't know if they would have any interest in Danish made products, rather than "Danish designed", as they put it.

There is only one brand that is trying to do something and I have done my best trying to help them, by telling them about some of the artisans and small factories, and that brand is Hansen Garments by the Norwegian designer Aase Helena Hansen.
http://www.hansengarments.com/

Trüffelschwein will be stocking Hansen

http://www.trueffelschweinberlin.com...shop/index.php
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simontuntelder View Post
The only problem is that nobody is interested in Danish production and nobody wants to pay the prices that a Danish made product would require.
Exactly. While no one is making products like SNS, how many buyers out there are really asking themselves, "Why aren't more things coming out of Denmark?" Given a chance (and a ton of cash), I'm sure Denmark could create the kind of infrastructure needed for such a venture but it's a matter of who wants to lay down that capital first for such an experiment. If it's happened, and worked, in other countries then I don't know why it couldn't there, too.

Vikinger kan sy, også... jo?
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
Exactly. While no one is making products like SNS, how many buyers out there are really asking themselves, "Why aren't more things coming out of Denmark?" Given a chance (and a ton of cash), I'm sure Denmark could create the kind of infrastructure needed for such a venture but it's a matter of who wants to lay down that capital first for such an experiment. If it's happened, and worked, in other countries then I don't know why it couldn't there, too.

Vikinger kan sy, også... jo?

Det kan de helt sikkert.

Denmark was once renowned for the textile industry and skilled labour, but the government decided to focus more on education rather than manual labour, which is totally stupid because not all are suited for a lengthy education. But this also meant that there wouldn't be any aid for people starting new factories for instance - but you could get some financial aid if you decided to open your factory in a 3rd world country. Just crazy. But that is no excuse for SNS and I have to say that is quite disappointing for me. They could might as well support some of the Danish workers that have supported them for 75 years before they became fashionable.

It's the same with the furniture industry. Danish designed and Danish made furniture was very popular all around the world, but people want disposable shit nowadays, so many of the lesser known Danish designers who focus on quality are having a terrible time, so they are trying to cut prices on production by moving it out of the country.

It's the same everywhere.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simontuntelder View Post
But that is no excuse for SNS and I have to say that is quite disappointing for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simontuntelder View Post
so many of the lesser known Danish designers who focus on quality are having a terrible time, so they are trying to cut prices on production by moving it out of the country.

It's the same everywhere.
Don't you think it's a bit harsh to criticize SNS for trying to run its business and staying profitable by keeping its prices low enough to compete in a fairly saturated outerwear market? In an ideal world, I'm sure many businesses would prefer to keep production within their own country if costs were the same but that's not the reality because, like you wrote, "it's the same everywhere."

Like I wrote before, setting up an industry that doesn't exist within a small country and being a relatively small company can't be cheap or even logistically possible while remaining profitable. I love SNS' products but I wonder how many buyers are looking around for dedicated altruism in their clothing brands, let alone if they care enough to pay extra for it.

Hvor er du fra? Min dansk venner i Los Angeles er fra Århaus, også.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
Don't you think it's a bit harsh to criticize SNS for trying to run its business and staying profitable by keeping its prices low enough to compete in a fairly saturated outerwear market? In an ideal world, I'm sure many businesses would prefer to keep production within their own country if costs were the same but that's not the reality because, like you wrote, "it's the same everywhere."

Like I wrote before, setting up an industry that doesn't exist within a small country and being a relatively small company can't be cheap or even logistically possible while remaining profitable. I love SNS' products but I wonder how many buyers are looking around for dedicated altruism in their clothing brands, let alone if they care enough to pay extra for it.

Hvor er du fra? Min dansk venner i Los Angeles er fra Århaus, også.

Sure, it's harsh. But they are the only brand that had a "made in Denmark" tag for a long time, which actually means that they were advertising falsely in some way. Other brands like Han Kjobenhavn are polite enough to write "Designed in Denmark", like the new Sierra Design 60/40 parkas selling on UrbanOutfitters that are "Designed in USA". And it's something that were never mentioned in a lot of intereviews. The interviews always said "knitted on old Stoll machines in the small town of Herning", which is true, but it never said sleeves attached somewhere in Lativa.
I love SNS and I have tons of sweaters from them, and even know people working for them, but I'm also a firm believer of altruism and the truth.

Just kidding. F**K the truth.

I would have loved if they were to make their sweaters here in Denmark, and I would even pay the premium, but I still have a lot of respect for the company and I wear the sweaters with pride. I'm glad they are finally getting some much-deserved spotlight. Because if you knew about the years when they weren't getting orders from fashion customers, then you would get a bit depressed too. They were making rib cuffs for other workwear brands that were producing jackets and making sweaters for the Danish military and prison personal.


Jeg bor lige nu Århus, men jeg har også boet i København - faktisk også i Herning. Men jeg er fra det billedskønne Nordjylland - altså toppen af Danmark.
post #14 of 25
I have a Andersen Andersen knit and I prefer it to anything I've seen from SNS quality wise.

The problem with production in Denmark is the wages the minimum wage is around 20$ for a over 18 worker and you can get someone in Poland etc. for half the price, so it will never be profitable in Denmark.

Almost all large production companies have moved their production out of the country, due to the cost of labour and tax.
post #15 of 25
Let's not forget technology. Once you fall behind it's almost impossible now in days to catch up.
That's why Italy and China will remain on top with Italy starting to lag.
The monies that go into textiles can't be matched with China. China produces some really fine knits and the prices are going up on those too. If you are a first world country and aren't in the textile game now, you never will be.

Japan is the next to fall. Fabric production and manufactoring is dying. Italy is crippled and I believe they produce the finest knits in the world with the best technology.That won't last long China will catch up and buy some country like Cambodia and set up shop there for pennies. it boils down to dollars in the end.

The people with money and the apprication for fine knits will still by from Italy , Germany, Japan, etc but the masses will buy from China.

Knits across the board will shoot up in price this fall and will continue to get more expensive.
Get use to it. There is no way around it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Styleforum Frontpage
Styleforum › Forums › Archives › Styleforum Frontpage › NEW S.N.S. Herning Fall/Winter 2011