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Some Of My Hermes Scarf-Print Ties - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Or perhaps some of us just find them to be visually offensive.

+1. But clearly the different strokes rule applies.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
The colors and patterns are vibrant and luxurious. I really like them, even though they are appropriate for almost nothing and can be a real challenge to pair with a suit or jacket.

Maybe I'm not creative enough, but how do you the more outrageous of these ties work? Would love to see some pics.

Oh and I really like the 3rd Versace tie.

Arg
post #18 of 25
The majority of these outrageous ties would work well with lightly patterned shirts featuring one or two (two is better) of the ties' dominant colours. Not a pin striped shirt, though.

A solid shirt would mean the look isn't pulled together. The tie would be off swimming by itself with no unity to the outfit.

A heavily/garishly patterned shirt would create too much visual noise - the eyes wouldn't have a natural resting place.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by aportnoy
+1. But clearly the different strokes rule applies.

x2
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
Oh, the specter of good taste threatens to raise its hoary head yet again!
Without laying down the dogma, I must say that to consider these ties as loud or offensive pretty much misses the point--and it's an exercise that, frankly, hadn't really occurred to me. I'm afraid the truly sublime nature of the silks and printing may not come across here (they seem kind of flat in the picture, much more vibrant in real life). They are, as objects, alluring and attractive in the most elemental way. Whenever I wear one of the Hermes ties people are drawn to them. And they don't say, Wow! Kind of a bright tie today, huh? Rather, they admire them and want to touch them and just look at them. One of the basic things that sets the scarf print apart from other ties is the lack of a repeat motif. It's an unusual feature in menswear. Almost everything we wear is built on the foundations of symmetry and repeating patterns. Despos touches on this with his tale of the vest. As he suggests, what made the vest successful was the unexpected way the figures came together. And I think FNB is right to invoke the term classic. These ties have been worn for years and are, simply put, part of the repertoire we have at our disposal when we get dressed. Just like dots, the rep tie, or small woven patterns. Of course they have rather more difficult associations and meanings than any of those, but they remain part of the canon. Wearing the scarf print is not a simple thing. But like an especially complicated maneuver in diving or gymnastics, it presents a degree of difficulty that really pays off when executed properly. So, please, let your freak flag fly!
I think the last time I wore any of these it was the Hermes Kachina print on the white background. I can't remember exactly what the pairings were, but I think it was a fairly quiet look in keeping with the subdued colors you see there. I think Newton is right to recognize the importance of combining these ties with other patterned pieces. About the snottiest look I could imagine would be the haughty French banker look of charcoal suit, white shirt, and a black scarf print with the rococo gold and red flourishes (but, again, that's an image you might want to play off of--as the Versace tie with the insane marine motif does).
My two cents.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
Oh, the specter of good taste threatens to raise its hoary head yet again!
Without laying down the dogma, I must say that to consider these ties as loud or offensive pretty much misses the point--and it's an exercise that, frankly, hadn't really occurred to me. I'm afraid the truly sublime nature of the silks and printing may not come across here (they seem kind of flat in the picture, much more vibrant in real life). They are, as objects, alluring and attractive in the most elemental way. Whenever I wear one of the Hermes ties people are drawn to them. And they don't say, Wow! Kind of a bright tie today, huh? Rather, they admire them and want to touch them and just look at them. One of the basic things that sets the scarf print apart from other ties is the lack of a repeat motif. It's an unusual feature in menswear. Almost everything we wear is built on the foundations of symmetry and repeating patterns. Despos touches on this with his tale of the vest. As he suggests, what made the vest successful was the unexpected way the figures came together. And I think FNB is right to invoke the term classic. These ties have been worn for years and are, simply put, part of the repertoire we have at our disposal when we get dressed. Just like dots, the rep tie, or small woven patterns. Of course they have rather more difficult associations and meanings than any of those, but they remain part of the canon. Wearing the scarf print is not a simple thing. But like an especially complicated maneuver in diving or gymnastics, it presents a degree of difficulty that really pays off when executed properly. So, please, let your freak flag fly!
I think the last time I wore any of these it was the Hermes Kachina print on the white background. I can't remember exactly what the pairings were, but I think it was a fairly quiet look in keeping with the subdued colors you see there. I think Newton is right to recognize the importance of combining these ties with other patterned pieces. About the snottiest look I could imagine would be the haughty French banker look of charcoal suit, white shirt, and a black scarf print with the rococo gold and red flourishes (but, again, that's an image you might want to play off of--as the Versace tie with the insane marine motif does).
My two cents.
I should apologize to you Pejsek. My reaction was simply to the assassinine comment made by FNB. The ties are not to my taste, but I do not find them offensive. My taste in ties runs towards the less exuberent. Like the others said, to each his own.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
Oh, no apology necessary, iammatt. I wasn't responding to any particular post and I most emphatically don't find anti-scarf-print sentiment offensive. As I said in my initial post, I recognize that the scarf prints are not in keeping with contemporary taste and can be difficult to wear. But I do think they should have their little corner.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I should apologize to you Pejsek. My reaction was simply to the assassinine comment made by FNB. The ties are not to my taste, but I do not find them offensive. My taste in ties runs towards the less exuberent. Like the others said, to each his own.
Nothing wrong with my comment. It is a sincere view on the use of scarf-print in contemporary dress. If you view anything you don't like as an "asinine comment" your style will always be limited.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
I think Newton is right to recognize the importance of combining these ties with other patterned pieces. About the snottiest look I could imagine would be the haughty French banker look of charcoal suit, white shirt, and a black scarf print with the rococo gold and red flourishes (but, again, that's an image you might want to play off of--as the Versace tie with the insane marine motif does).
My two cents.

20 cents more like it!

Haughty French banker look - great for some, I guess (Such as French bankers). The tie in that combo wouldn't be too bad - but the gaudy one would be too much for my nerves, I think!
post #25 of 25
Bumping this old thread just so people can see the pics of some of those bold, garish prints. Very 70s/80s. Not sure if I would wear them, but I can dig them.
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