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Watch maintenance

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I bought a Omega Speedmaster back in '99 and they recommended that every four years I send it into the factory for maintenance reasons. They want somewhere around $500 to open up the watch and make sure everything is working, and I just don't see the value add in it. Has anybody sent their watch in to the factor for a similar checkup?? Did you notice any significant changes in the way the watch performed...I have an automatic, so I am also wondering if the maintenance helps the second hand sweep smoother. Thanks.
post #2 of 8
I have a Baume & Mercier Malibu Chrono, which has an automatic movement comparable to the one in your Omega. I must get it serviced at least every three or four years simply because the movement starts to gain (or lose) a minute or two a day, which is much more than I can live with. The best thing to do would be to call local watchmakers or repairers and see if anyone is prepared to calibrate/clean/service your watch for you. You can probably negotiate a better price than what you would have to pay the manufacturer. In my city, there's only one fellow who will work on my watch, but he charges me half of what any jeweler selling Baume & Mercier would charge to send the watch to some centralized Baume & Mercier service center in Montreal for the same work. He also takes about half as long.
post #3 of 8
The short answer: Yes and No. I'll explain with a bit more detail: Mechanical wristwatches use lubricating oil to insure the proper and smooth movement of all the working pieces and bearings (along with the synthetic jewels). Now, over a period of several years and various temperature / humidity conditions, plus regular use the oil starts to lose its lubricating properties (just like in a car, but less drastic). At the same time some smaller essential moving parts, perhaps one of the wheels of the going train, or one of the bearings, have been sufficiently worn and can effect the precision of the watch. Sometimes, the combination of the watch oil losing its properties and part (metal) fatigue / wear equals problems. That being said, there are several items to take into considerations regarding service intervals. The first being the frequency of the watch usage, how often is the watch on your wrist? The frequency of use is a primary determining factor, the more it is on your wrist / used everyday, the more often service intervals are needed. Have you noticed a significant problem with the watch / accuracy? Does it lose seconds / minutes / hours (days?) at a time? Is it a plus or minus loss? The more time that is lost / gained, the greater the chance of more problems developing (as if losing an hour a day is not enough). As well, the seconds will only sweep as well and fast as the movement will allow. A watch beating at 18000 vph will stop (i.e. sweep: the more times the seconds hand stops, the smother it appears to sweep) 300 times every 60 seconds. A watch the beats at 21600 vph will stop 360 times every 60 seconds, etc... If you purchased the watch in 1999, then 5 years have passed. If it was my watch, I would personally send it in for service regardless of the aforementioned items. Jon.
post #4 of 8
From my experience with the speed of Omega service, I suggest you prepare to be without your watch for a good while.
post #5 of 8
As a watchaholic (WIS) i recommend that you service it when it is no longer keeping good time. If a watch is keeping time, all is well inside. And there is no need for an official Omega service -- find a good online dealer. Try Roland G. Murphy at www.equationoftime.com or Tom Gref at www.bestoftimeswatch.com.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
As a watchaholic (WIS) i recommend that you service it when it is no longer keeping good time. If a watch is keeping time, all is well inside. And there is no need for an official Omega service -- find a good online dealer. Try Roland G. Murphy at www.equationoftime.com or Tom Gref at www.bestoftimeswatch.com.
I would stay away from Roland G. Murphy (RGM) . Jon.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
I would stay away from Roland G. Murphy (RGM) .
Do tell, I was thinking of sending a piece there. I have no affiliation with RGM whatsoever.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
As a watchaholic (WIS) i recommend that you service it when it is no longer keeping good time.  If a watch is keeping time, all is well inside.  And there is no need for an official Omega service -- find a good online dealer.  Try Roland G. Murphy at www.equationoftime.com or Tom Gref at www.bestoftimeswatch.com.
I agree 100% Even with a small fast do nothing as less you open a watch, better is for it . This is what said me the director of Patek's Shop Place Vendome.
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