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Dress shirt material - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan
My fellow law students believe Joseph A. Banks to be a top-notch suitmaker.

Have you seen the font on their logo? Clearly Jos. A Bank is as classy as it gets.
post #17 of 27
If you are close to a Filene's Basement or a Marshalls, check there. They regularly have decent Ralph Lauren polo shirts for $40.

Or learn your size and hit eBay, where you can do even better.
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Devil's Hands
Why don't you go to NM or a boutique and see if you can tell the difference yourself? If you don't, then save your money (but you will). Field research is worth 1000 thread posts.


I realize that. But I'd like to get an idea of what I should be looking for before I go out to the field.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey
When considering any style of 100% cotton dress shirt, you should pay attention to the type of cotton, a two-ply Egyptian cotton of 110 to 120 threads per square inch should be the lowest you will accept. These shirts feel thinner and silkier. They wear like iron, too.

Will it actually say on the label that it's a certain type of cotton or would I have to determine that myself?
post #19 of 27
Will it actually say on the label that it's a certain type of cotton or would I have to determine that myself?[/quote] "Look for the label or ask you grocer for it by name."
post #20 of 27
This thread should help you understand why all cotton shirting fabrics are not created equal:

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=12238
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Popular better brands found in departments stores are: Hickey-Freeman (these are full fitting), Gitman Bros. (full fitting), Burberry (a bit slimmer), Robert Talbott (way overpriced, over-rated, and full fitting, and they shrink like hell at the cleaners). You can try Ralph Lauren Polo, but I would only buy on-sale.

You've obviously never tried Robert Talbott MTM, which is a totally different story from their RTW shirts. Even then, Talbott RTW is still better than many other RTW shirt makers out there that cost the same price (ie Pink). I would also argue that Talbott is underrated, since they don't get mentioned that often on this forum, or anywhere else for that matter.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink22m
You've obviously never tried Robert Talbott MTM, which is a totally different story from their RTW shirts. Even then, Talbott RTW is still better than many other RTW shirt makers out there that cost the same price (ie Pink). I would also argue that Talbott is underrated, since they don't get mentioned that often on this forum, or anywhere else for that matter.

I agree. While the fit may not be to the taste of this forum, the construction and details of the shirt (decent buttons, pattern-matched split yoke, etc) are better than many other brands in the same price range ($130-$160). Their fabrics are also quite nice and are offered in some wonderful patterns.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink22m
You've obviously never tried Robert Talbott MTM, which is a totally different story from their RTW shirts. Even then, Talbott RTW is still better than many other RTW shirt makers out there that cost the same price (ie Pink). I would also argue that Talbott is underrated, since they don't get mentioned that often on this forum, or anywhere else for that matter.
I have two Robert Talbott (one I bought for 50% off, and the other my wife gave me for a present and paid full retail). These shirts are expensive for RTW at $75.00 and $150.00 respectively. Both have shrunk in the collar so much that they measure about a 15, when they were made in size 16 - 35. I can't imagine that the MTM is much better, bbut if you say so then OK. But my experience with their RTW leaves me looking elsewhere.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
I have two Robert Talbott (one I bought for 50% off, and the other my wife gave me for a present and paid full retail). These shirts are expensive for RTW at $75.00 and $150.00 respectively. Both have shrunk in the collar so much that they measure about a 15, when they were made in size 16 - 35.

I can't imagine that the MTM is much better, bbut if you say so then OK. But my experience with their RTW leaves me looking elsewhere.

That is quite puzzling. Where did you purchase the shirts? How are they laundered? I have never had this problem with any of my dress shirts, Talbott included.
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
This thread should help you understand why all cotton shirting fabrics are not created equal:

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=12238

awsome thread! thanks
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink22m
That is quite puzzling. Where did you purchase the shirts? How are they laundered? I have never had this problem with any of my dress shirts, Talbott included.
First (an oxford cloth) was purchased four years ago at an upscale men's store, who sells Zegna, H-F, and Oxxford. The second (broadcloth in a green stripe) was purchased last Christmas at Nordstrom. I have my shirts professionally laundered - light starch only. My Individualized custom shirts have not shrunk, but several Ike Behar's and every McClure (maker of men's store brands) has shrunk. RTW Talbott is no better, so I am sticking with Individualized, the Nordstrom black label, and I plan to try some Jantzen.
post #27 of 27
I prefer linen for casual summer shirts, wool/cashemere/silk for casul shirts in fall and winter. Only cotton for dress-shirts.
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