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Sea Island fabrics

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I bought a Gimo Italiana Sea Island fabric sweater at Marshalls and really like the feeling of this fabric. Do any members have experience with Sea Island fabrics? I think this one is rayon but I'm not sure as the fabric label has been cut, it did have an outer tag on it that said 100% certified Sea Island fabic, maybe it was more specific than that but I can't remember.
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasper
I bought a Gimo Italiana Sea Island fabric sweater at Marshalls and really like the feeling of this fabric. Do any members have experience with Sea Island fabrics? I think this one is rayon but I'm not sure as the fabric label has been cut, it did have an outer tag on it that said 100% certified Sea Island fabic, maybe it was more specific than that but I can't remember.


Sea Island should only be 100% cotton, nothing else.
post #3 of 23
If it's rayon, then the designation "Sea Island" not only has no meaning, it is possibly a trademark violation.

"Sea Island" used to refer to cotton grown on the islands off the American Southeastern coast. It was reputed to be among the best in the world. The economics of growing it stopped making sense a long time ago. Recently, within the last decade or so, West Indian growers banded together and formed an association and revived the name as a sort of cross-industry brand. It's very good cotton (shirting cotton, BTW, not knit yarns for sweaters) though most believe it is not as good as the best stuff grown in Egypt and spun and woven in Switzerland or Italy.
post #4 of 23
Is this, then, the origin of the Sea Island Quality designation one sometimes sees on T&A shirts, pajamas, robes (that it somehow meets historical Sea Island standards even if grown in Egypt or elsewhere)?
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
Is this, then, the origin of the Sea Island Quality designation one sometimes sees on T&A shirts, pajamas, robes (that it somehow meets historical Sea Island standards even if grown in Egypt or elsewhere)?
I don't know. The seemingly uncessary use of the qualifier "Quality" makes me suspicious, however.
post #6 of 23
Now there are Sea Island knit yarns produced by those who also produce yarns for shirt fabric. The Brit shirtmakers use the phrase "Sea Island Quality" to bring attention to their shirts made from higher-yarn-number fabrics, perhaps 120/2 or 140/2 and up. WISICA may be like fil d'Ecosse. "Fil d'Ecosse" refers to a specific type of yarn, but these days it most definitely needn't be from Scotland to be labeled "fil d'Ecosse." The particular strain of cotton marketed as WISICA may be grown in more than one region. Given the optimal climate and conditions the possibilities are probably limited, but it's something to think about.
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
"Sea Island" used to refer to cotton grown on the islands off the American Southeastern coast. It was reputed to be among the best in the world. The economics of growing it stopped making sense a long time ago. Recently, within the last decade or so, West Indian growers banded together and formed an association and revived the name as a sort of cross-industry brand. It's very good cotton (shirting cotton, BTW, not knit yarns for sweaters) though most believe it is not as good as the best stuff grown in Egypt and spun and woven in Switzerland or Italy.


Thanks for the information but I wonder if the conditions on those islands are so good for cotton couldn't they be used to grow rayon or wool?
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasper
Thanks for the information but I wonder if the conditions on those islands are so good for cotton couldn't they be used to grow rayon or wool?
The climate is not right. You'd need a transparent metal greenhouse to grow those crops.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasper
Thanks for the information but I wonder if the conditions on those islands are so good for cotton couldn't they be used to grow rayon or wool?


Good growing conditions for rayon would probably preclude cotton production. Rayon is a manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, made by 'converting purified cellulose to xanthate, dissolving the xanthate in dilute caustic soda and then regenerating the cellulose.'
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will
Good growing conditions for rayon would probably preclude cotton production. Rayon is a manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, made by 'converting purified cellulose to xanthate, dissolving the xanthate in dilute caustic soda and then regenerating the cellulose.'

Oh, that doesn't sound very natural!
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will
Good growing conditions for rayon would probably preclude cotton production. Rayon is a manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, made by 'converting purified cellulose to xanthate, dissolving the xanthate in dilute caustic soda and then regenerating the cellulose.'
. . . and let's not even go into the problems with planting crops to grow wool.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmatt
. . . and let's not even go into the problems with planting crops to grow wool.
Indeed. That's a tricky one.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
The climate is not right. You'd need a transparent metal greenhouse to grow those crops.

My wife and I have a clear metal greenhouse out back. The refractive porousity of the clear metal makes the plants grow like the dickens.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmatt
. . . and let's not even go into the problems with planting crops to grow wool.

I understand there's a new cross pollinated wool-rayon plant used for blends.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Gimo Italiana Sea Island

Which sea? Which island?
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