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Custom White's Boots ... Thoughts? - Page 523

post #7831 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechanic08 View Post

That was why I was skeptical about being sized at a 15 1/2 when I've worn a 14 since high school. my thinking is the boots are too long and the natural bend point of the 15 1/2 boot is further forward than it would be if they were shorter. I went to the shop because I figured I could eliminate any errors on my part doing the outlines and measurements myself. In regards to the boot care, what is a better interval than what I've been doing. My thoughts were during the break in, treat the boots a little more often then once broke in about once a month roughly. Thoughts?

 

I have heard of other people being put in the wrong sized boots by retailers and White's themselves.  They have a bias in fitting people into longer footwear than necessary because a little too long is much better than a little too short.  An inch in front of the toes is not a problem if everything else is right about the fit, but it sounds like they aren't working right for you.

 

I am no expert on foot care, so please don't place to much faith in it.  It is based on my experience and what the boot makers, including White's, say.

 

First, boots should promptly (daily) have mud and dirt wiped off of them with a damp cloth.  Mud sucks the oils out of the leather.  Dirt/sand can cause friction in seams between leather and creases, which will break down the leather.

 

If the mud is already dried, you can try brushing off some of it first with a horse hair brush.  If a damp cloth isn't enough, don't be afraid to use more water and potential a very mild soap to clean them.  However, if the boots aren't dirty, don't do this.  Within reason, you can't brush boots too much.  Then, you can condition your boots with a product such as Lexol or Bickmore 4.   Washing the boots thoroughly will remove some of the natural oils, so the more often you have to wash them, the more often you will use Lexol or Bick 4.  Also, dry weather can really damage leather, so you will want to condition them whenever you perceive the leather to be noticeably dry.  Other than heavy washing and super dry weather, you wouldn't want to condition the boots more often a couple times a year, though a few extra times at the beginning to help with breaking them in isn't a big deal.

 

It also is very good for boots to dry thoroughly between wearing them.  This can mean alternating between pairs of boots.  You should never dry your boots in an oven or next to a heater.  Some people advise using an oven on low for drying a boot or applying Obenaufs, but I think you risk harming the leather more than you help them.  If your boots are regularly getting wet and you need to wear them again soon, White's and most other quality bootmakers advised buying an approx. $40 boot dryer from Peet.  This will safely dry your boots overnight.  Shoe (or boot) trees can also help, but they don't absorb massive amounts of moisture, just small amounts.

 

Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP is a great product, and is recommended by most quality bookmakers, but it will darken leather considerably.  It also isn't necessary unless you are wearing your boots in extreme conditions: very muddy/wet conditions, very dry conditions, or exposing them to nasty chemicals.  How often it will be used will depend on where you wear your boots.

 

Although I am just passing on hearsay, some experts on the Shoe Care thread on this forum, advise against using any conditioners with petroleum products or silicone in them.  This includes Venetian Shoe Cream, so avoid that, despite what many will say.  At the very least, it costs a lot more than Lexol or Bickmore 4 and there isn't convincing evidence it is better.  Due their price, Lexol, Bickmore 4, and Obenauf's are really the go-to products.  People also speak highly of Huberd's Shoe Grease, which I believe is relatively equivalent to Obenauf's, but I might be wrong.

 

So, in conclusion, there is no fixed way to say how often is too often or how rarely is too rarely for treating your boots, but know that most guys either never treat their boots, which is too rarely, or over-treat their boots.   Very few just treat them when the leather obviously needs it.  However, everybody agrees that you need to get the mud and dirt off them promptly and that you can't go wrong with brushing.  

 

I find the FAQ on the website for Nick's Boots is excellent and covers these topics too.  Nick's makes a product that has a lot in common with White's, so the advice is fairly interchangeable: 

 

http://nicksboots.com/faq

post #7832 of 8703
This isn't strictly on topic, but I thought given the great number of photographs from Japanese retailers people have referenced in this forum that some here might appreciate this fascinating book I read last weekend-




http://www.semcoop.com/book/9780465059737
post #7833 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechanic08 View Post

That was why I was skeptical about being sized at a 15 1/2 when I've worn a 14 since high school. my thinking is the boots are too long and the natural bend point of the 15 1/2 boot is further forward than it would be if they were shorter. I went to the shop because I figured I could eliminate any errors on my part doing the outlines and measurements myself. In regards to the boot care, what is a better interval than what I've been doing. My thoughts were during the break in, treat the boots a little more often then once broke in about once a month roughly. Thoughts?

 

 

I'm i the middle of getting a custom pair of boots, and have found that they run quite big. I was sized at a 13, but when the try-on boots arrived my toe was exactly where you are pointing. I normally wear a 11.5 FFFF, and ended up ordering a 11 FF.

 

They fit pretty good, but I think my second pair will be 10.5 FFF as they do run so large.  

post #7834 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post
 

 

I have heard of other people being put in the wrong sized boots by retailers and White's themselves.  They have a bias in fitting people into longer footwear than necessary because a little too long is much better than a little too short.  An inch in front of the toes is not a problem if everything else is right about the fit, but it sounds like they aren't working right for you.

 

I am no expert on foot care, so please don't place to much faith in it.  It is based on my experience and what the boot makers, including White's, say.

 

First, boots should promptly (daily) have mud and dirt wiped off of them with a damp cloth.  Mud sucks the oils out of the leather.  Dirt/sand can cause friction in seams between leather and creases, which will break down the leather.

 

If the mud is already dried, you can try brushing off some of it first with a horse hair brush.  If a damp cloth isn't enough, don't be afraid to use more water and potential a very mild soap to clean them.  However, if the boots aren't dirty, don't do this.  Within reason, you can't brush boots too much.  Then, you can condition your boots with a product such as Lexol or Bickmore 4.   Washing the boots thoroughly will remove some of the natural oils, so the more often you have to wash them, the more often you will use Lexol or Bick 4.  Also, dry weather can really damage leather, so you will want to condition them whenever you perceive the leather to be noticeably dry.  Other than heavy washing and super dry weather, you wouldn't want to condition the boots more often a couple times a year, though a few extra times at the beginning to help with breaking them in isn't a big deal.

 

It also is very good for boots to dry thoroughly between wearing them.  This can mean alternating between pairs of boots.  You should never dry your boots in an oven or next to a heater.  Some people advise using an oven on low for drying a boot or applying Obenaufs, but I think you risk harming the leather more than you help them.  If your boots are regularly getting wet and you need to wear them again soon, White's and most other quality bootmakers advised buying an approx. $40 boot dryer from Peet.  This will safely dry your boots overnight.  Shoe (or boot) trees can also help, but they don't absorb massive amounts of moisture, just small amounts.

 

Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP is a great product, and is recommended by most quality bookmakers, but it will darken leather considerably.  It also isn't necessary unless you are wearing your boots in extreme conditions: very muddy/wet conditions, very dry conditions, or exposing them to nasty chemicals.  How often it will be used will depend on where you wear your boots.

 

Although I am just passing on hearsay, some experts on the Shoe Care thread on this forum, advise against using any conditioners with petroleum products or silicone in them.  This includes Venetian Shoe Cream, so avoid that, despite what many will say.  At the very least, it costs a lot more than Lexol or Bickmore 4 and there isn't convincing evidence it is better.  Due their price, Lexol, Bickmore 4, and Obenauf's are really the go-to products.  People also speak highly of Huberd's Shoe Grease, which I believe is relatively equivalent to Obenauf's, but I might be wrong.

 

So, in conclusion, there is no fixed way to say how often is too often or how rarely is too rarely for treating your boots, but know that most guys either never treat their boots, which is too rarely, or over-treat their boots.   Very few just treat them when the leather obviously needs it.  However, everybody agrees that you need to get the mud and dirt off them promptly and that you can't go wrong with brushing.  

 

I find the FAQ on the website for Nick's Boots is excellent and covers these topics too.  Nick's makes a product that has a lot in common with White's, so the advice is fairly interchangeable: 

 

http://nicksboots.com/faq

 

I should get my boots back in about a week. Will post pictures of the eye-let replacement and show you guys what kinda of job they did. 

 

Great information above! could yo provide a link to that forum of boot care. I have read every post on this forum and order my boots through Bakers and Kyle. Now that I almost have the boots I want to know how to keep them in good condition. I also like having 2 pairs of boots to let them 'rest' and will break in the first pair to know for sure about the second pair's size and style.

post #7835 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechanic08 View Post


Here's a pic of the toe, my finger location is where the tip of my big toe goes to.

Thanks for any info

I`m sorry to say, but dealer fitted or not, these have to be way oversized. I`d say an inch maximum of space upfront after end of big toe. To go from 14 wide to 15B seems unusual. Did they have the full range of sizes, or they didn't have yours and had a 15B? You should try on a few pairs both up and down the size spectrum until you feel comfortable. Take them back and speak to a senior person at the store. Seems very unusual.

post #7836 of 8703
I went back to the shop today, they're was a miscommunication between myself and the store, I said I didn't want the steel toe, and they forgot to mention the plastic toe cap or the composite toe, so the leather toe is slightly caving, but I was able to get a set of boot trees to help support them when not wearing the boots. If I do end up changing jobs, I will more than likely order another pair of whites with the composite toe for work and keep these regular toes for the rest of the time outside of work.
post #7837 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by daizawaguy View Post

I`m sorry to say, but dealer fitted or not, these have to be way oversized. I`d say an inch maximum of space upfront after end of big toe. To go from 14 wide to 15B seems unusual. Did they have the full range of sizes, or they didn't have yours and had a 15B? You should try on a few pairs both up and down the size spectrum until you feel comfortable. Take them back and speak to a senior person at the store. Seems very unusual.


Unfortunately they didn't have the bigger sizes available to try several on. After rechecking my feet in the boots, the gap between the toe and end isn't as big as it looks in the photo. Hopefully the boot trees help.
post #7838 of 8703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechanic08 View Post

I went back to the shop today, they're was a miscommunication between myself and the store, I said I didn't want the steel toe, and they forgot to mention the plastic toe cap or the composite toe, so the leather toe is slightly caving, but I was able to get a set of boot trees to help support them when not wearing the boots. If I do end up changing jobs, I will more than likely order another pair of whites with the composite toe for work and keep these regular toes for the rest of the time outside of work.


It may sound strange, but some people really like that collapsed-toe box look.  Others feel that it makes the boot more comfortable if the boot is on the shorter side, which, of course, yours aren't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mechanic08 View Post


Unfortunately they didn't have the bigger sizes available to try several on. After rechecking my feet in the boots, the gap between the toe and end isn't as big as it looks in the photo. Hopefully the boot trees help.


These things can be surprising tough to gauge accurately.  I really do hope everything works out for you with these boots.

post #7839 of 8703
My favorites. Water buffalo
post #7840 of 8703
shame about those oversized white's. when i first became interested in getting some, i went to my local white's/nicks dealer to get fitted and discovered it was run by some asshole old man that was dead set on trying to convince me that white's and nicks make the exact same boots and even insultingly tried to talk me out of getting them. i thought he must have only dealt with firefighters, but i guess there's someone on this forum that has gotten multiple pairs of custom nicks from him. happy that i sent in my fit sheet to baker's and dealt with them instead. no way i was giving that old bastard any of my money.
post #7841 of 8703

I should be getting my Christmas present soon - brown CXL SDs, brass hardware, regular heel, natural edge, vibram composite half sole. Pictures to follow. Turn around was very fast - ordered 12/17 and finished on 1/7. Haven't ever had a half sole on White's, so I'll be interested to see how it works out. These will be more "inside" boots for casual dress. I have my smooth distressed BHs for hiking and outside work and assorted others.

 

BTW, not White's related, but I've recently revived my appreciation for my old RW 877s and Iron Rangers. They had been out of the rotation for a while and I was considering selling them. But, while not nearly as supportive as White's, I like the style and they are more comfortable than I remembered. I'm keeping them for when I get in the mood for something different.

post #7842 of 8703
Gents, I have yet to be led astray by this thread, so I would like to ask for three recommendations:
1) I need a belt to go with my natural cxl boots (w/ brown edge dressing). It doesn't have to be a natural cxl belt. Any good belts out there?
2) What are the best boot laces to replace the laces my boots came with?
3) What shoe trees work best with whites semi-dress boots? I have a pair of trees for my dress shoes, but they don't seem to sit in my boots correctly.
Any advice is appreciated!
post #7843 of 8703

I really like the Wolverine 1000 mile waxed cotton laces. They are just a bit thicker and waxier than most other replacement laces, including the ones on <Therightlace.com>.

 

http://www.wolverine.com/US/en/1000-mile-1-4-inch-flat-shoelaces/22379Z.html

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GoodAg View Post

2) What are the best boot laces to replace the laces my boots came with?
post #7844 of 8703

I think probably this has been addressed, but I'll ask again:  Is the arch support on the Rainier Oxford shoes comparable to that on SD boots?

post #7845 of 8703

Hi everyone. Looking to get my second pair of White's. My first pair - pictured below - have been fantastic. I love the arch-ease and robust build and especially the heel. That said, I am thinking about changing things up aesthetically on my second pair.

I think the details in question are 1) going with a block heel at regular height rather than a cuban heel 2) still unsure about the sole. I am looking for a robust, hardy boot but also one that can be dressed up a bit and isn't too utilitarian. 

 

At this point I am strongly leaning toward british tan at 10" 

 

Any big fans of the british tan out there? I've read - as I recall - that some people are not crazy about the block heel at the standard height because the gait seems a little off. Is there a consensus on that?  Also I am wondering if a full commando sole might be too clunky. Oddly it seems to be the only sole available that seems really rugged. I wish they had a more recessed commando sole available, but I am considering it anyway, clunky looks notwithstanding, as I would like something that I can hike around in, but also polish up a bit.

 

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