or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › High End Cologne
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

High End Cologne - Page 2

post #16 of 30
First off: don't think for a second that the cost of ingredients of most niche brand perfumes is substantially higher than the cost of designer brand perfumes' ingredients. We're talking $2.50 vs $2 per bottle, something like that. There are exceptions: Creed, while much maligned for its fleeting perfumes, uses more natural ingredients which also contributes to their perfumes being somewhat fleeting. In general, naturals are more fleeting than synthetics. Second: don't think that naturals = expensive = good and synthetics = cheap = bad. There are cheap and expensive naturals and there are cheap and expensive synthetics. Synthetics are a necessary component of perfumes without which modern perfumery would literally have never existed and we'd all still be splashing scented citrus waters on ourselves 12 times a day. As for the price of niche brand perfumes, I think it's a combination of pricing as a tool of raising perceived value AND of the necessity of asking higher prices because the makers have to make a profit while selling much less of the stuff. If you're really really into the stuff, start looking into vintage Guerlain, Chanel, Caron, Dior etc. 1970's or earlier. They are more widely available than you would think, especially on the Bay.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaune Head View Post
If you're serious about this stuff, check out these sites. It's not just designer crap that advertises in Maxim:

http://www.thedifferentcompany.com/

http://www.editionsdeparfums.com/mallesite_gb/index.htm

Frederic Malle makes some very nice fragrances, Carnal Flower is one of my favourites. Also check out Serge Lutens.
post #18 of 30
Everyone is right. I like to mix up the price range from Creed down to Hermes. I also have a bottle from a store in Red Bank, NJ that was developed by the owner and bears his name (with an "ino" on the end for a little more "sophistication" and that ran me two bills. They pump it into the store and then you gotta have it. Got a few compliments on it. (I won't mention the name unless you ask me because I don't think you're supposed to shill on the site.) So the point is you can run from $200 to $85, depending on what you like. I seem to never use a bottle up--still nursing my Helmut Lang Cuiron from about 5 years ago. THAT one is a killer! No longer available, though, damn it.
post #19 of 30
^^ Agree on Cuiron. Still nursing my old bottle as well. Although Mr. Blass does okay in a pinch for me.

Funny thing, though: more expensive doesn't necessarily mean better - sometimes a scent can be awkwardly-composed, or just not work with your chemistry no matter how much you spent.

iirc, Mona di Oiro's scents are notorious for smelling awful on paper, but faring much better on skin.

As for Creed in particular, I'm not really a fan of their marketing but they have put out a few good scents, but I can think of a dozen houses I'd put before them in terms of quality product/composition.
post #20 of 30
interesting. I REALLY like TF Azure Lime, but I've yet to know of a cheaper alternative or something which smells close enough. Personally, if I like it enough I'll buy it. No other real factor involved.
post #21 of 30
Although now mostly marketing (as the differences have blurred substantially, and there really is no absolute standard anyway) one thing that did drive price was the concetration of the scent.

- Eau de cologne (splash on) was the weakest
- Eau de cologne spray was deemed slightly better because the sealed container preserved the scent longer than a bottle that was openable
- Eau de toilette was slightly stronger
- Eau de parfum stronger still (usually only for women)
- Parfum or essence de parfum is most concentrated (usually sold in very small sizes) (women only).

But take these with a big pinch of salt as lines are VERY blurry.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lee View Post
Everyone is right. I like to mix up the price range from Creed down to Hermes. I also have a bottle from a store in Red Bank, NJ that was developed by the owner and bears his name (with an "ino" on the end for a little more "sophistication" and that ran me two bills. They pump it into the store and then you gotta have it. Got a few compliments on it. (I won't mention the name unless you ask me because I don't think you're supposed to shill on the site.) So the point is you can run from $200 to $85, depending on what you like. I seem to never use a bottle up--still nursing my Helmut Lang Cuiron from about 5 years ago. THAT one is a killer! No longer available, though, damn it.

It's not often you get to talk about Hermes as the lower end of a spectrum...
(Is Creed really that much more expensive? I know very little about colognes, though I did see 250mL of "Spice & Wool" for $550 earlier in this thread)
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBugatti View Post
Although now mostly marketing (as the differences have blurred substantially, and there really is no absolute standard anyway) one thing that did drive price was the concetration of the scent.

- Eau de cologne (splash on) was the weakest
- Eau de cologne spray was deemed slightly better because the sealed container preserved the scent longer than a bottle that was openable
- Eau de toilette was slightly stronger
- Eau de parfum stronger still (usually only for women)
- Parfum or essence de parfum is most concentrated (usually sold in very small sizes) (women only).

But take these with a big pinch of salt as lines are VERY blurry.

Thanks for that.. Ill add that to my 'what I learned on SF' list. Always wondered at the potency of various scents, never knew there was such a heiarchy.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post
It's not often you get to talk about Hermes as the lower end of a spectrum...
(Is Creed really that much more expensive? I know very little about colognes, though I did see 250mL of "Spice & Wool" for $550 earlier in this thread)

550? I haven't seen that at Ulta/sephora last i looked.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBugatti View Post
Although now mostly marketing (as the differences have blurred substantially, and there really is no absolute standard anyway) one thing that did drive price was the concetration of the scent.

- Eau de cologne (splash on) was the weakest
- Eau de cologne spray was deemed slightly better because the sealed container preserved the scent longer than a bottle that was openable
- Eau de toilette was slightly stronger
- Eau de parfum stronger still
- Parfum or essence de parfum is most concentrated (usually sold in very small sizes)

But take these with a big pinch of salt as lines are VERY blurry.

FTFY
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldcava View Post
Thanks for that.. Ill add that to my 'what I learned on SF' list. Always wondered at the potency of various scents, never knew there was such a heiarchy.
Most scents are offered in just one strength - the standard one being EdT. Some houses offer multiple concentrations of a scent - generally Chanel, Guerlain, maybe Patou, Hermes. Among them, Chanel and Guerlain typically tweak the formula between concentrations - Jicky in EdT is noticeably different from Jicky parfum, according to those who wear both. I can say that Chanel Cuir de Russie is better in parfum than EdT: it's like the difference in listening to a symphony in person, versus over a radio. Just a bit of pointless minutia there. More minutia: some niche houses don't offer Edt - Le Labo and Ormonde Jayne only do up EdP or even parfum strengths, as far as I've seen. Both houses make some fantastic scents.
post #27 of 30
Some makers, including Ormonde Jayne, Frederic Malle, and The Different Company, offer a sampler set of their entire product line. You can keep the manly ones for yourself and give the girly stuff to your...girl...

It's a good way to find out what you like without making a serious investment.
post #28 of 30
Chandler Burr, Luca Turin and Basenotes will all give you plenty of info into the mechanics and ingredients of scents.
Despite what is in them an inexpensive brand may smell great on you and last a long time, and something very expensive might fade within the hour.

Try 'em till you find one you like.
post #29 of 30
The Dollar Tree carries any number of copy-cat colognes.
If the difference isn't there for one's nose, then the no reason to go for the high end stuff.
post #30 of 30
Thread Starter 
I like what I like, for whatever the reasons. Summertime I wear Virgin Island Water (love the coconut/lime combo, and will even wear it once or twice in winter for the reminder), Green Irish Tweed and Tabarome fall into winter, Vetiver in the spring into summer, and sparingly during the summer, and then I'll throw in Millisme Imperial all year round. I just bought the new Creed from rioni on B&S and like that a lot too, as well as the TF Tuscan Leather. Having previously compared it to Dunhill, I now recognize the difference. The TF is still on me a bit after a day at work, 2 hours at the gym, and a shower. Maybe its EDP? I'll add the TF to my fall/winter rotation for sure and the new Creed into all except summer. Almost all (except two) I bought from splits right here on SF. This is a great place to try out scents you may not want to shell out the big bucks for.

Soime great replies here so far.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › High End Cologne