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Anyone Ever Used "AuctionSniper.com" - Page 2

post #16 of 48
That makes sense. I'm a buyer and a seller, as well. As a seller, it's a pleasant surprise when a sniper sends the price up during the last seconds. As a buyer I expect to be sniped and have a set price that I'm willing to bid. If someone outbids me, so be it.
post #17 of 48
As a seller I love it too. Why? Because I cannot count how many auctions I forgot to bid on before I used snipe software. If everyone used snipe software, the problem of holding off on an early bid (to avoid driving prices up, a smart strategy) and then forgetting to enter a bid before the auction closes, would not be a problem.
post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini
If you've got a computer with a fairly open connection (and it seems most here do), there's several freeware programs that do the same thing as auctionsnipe.

For Mac, I use a program called JBid. Totally free, totally customizable, totally great.

Does(a fairly open connection) this mean that you must be on-line for Jbid to work?

If so, that is a limitation, because the other programs work off a server. So you can set up your snipes and be done.

If anyone knows of a freeware program that works even if you are not on-line, please post it's name.

Thanks!
post #19 of 48
I use a Polish service, which is quite excellent. http://www.snip.pl/en/
post #20 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mano
Why would a seller hate it if it sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?

Why would buyers (who don't use it) like it if sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?

Because it prevents a bidding war from breaking out.

Without sniping, someone puts in their max bid, say $100. They get out bid and price is now $101. Suddenly, the item that was only worth $100 to the original buyer may now be worth more. The thought process moves away from the total cost of the item to the incremental cost of winning the auction. Thus, if the item was worth bidding on, it surely is worth another $2 to get it. Moreover, watching the auction over a period of days may increase the desire for the item further justifying an additional bid.

With sniping, the original buyer never gets a chance to increase the original bid and thus the purchase price stays lower than it might have otherwise.

On the other hand (there's always another hand), the prevalence of sniping may result in higher prices because you have to truly put in your max bid to make sure you don't lose to another sniper because you don't have the chance to rebid as you would without sniping. For example, there is a pair of Alden suede chukkas (size 7D) [blatant attempt to prevent other SF members from bidding against me] that I'd really like. I put in my snipe bid when they were first listed. I've subsequently increased the amount of my bid even though there is only one low bid on the item because I don't want to lose these to another sniper (at least at a price between by original snipe and my increased price).

I think sniping may create the appearance of lower prices, but I'm not sure if it's really true.
post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolo
Because it prevents a bidding war from breaking out.

Without sniping, someone puts in their max bid, say $100. They get out bid and price is now $101. Suddenly, the item that was only worth $100 to the original buyer may now be worth more. The thought process moves away from the total cost of the item to the incremental cost of winning the auction. Thus, if the item was worth bidding on, it surely is worth another $2 to get it. Moreover, watching the auction over a period of days may increase the desire for the item further justifying an additional bid.

With sniping, the original buyer never gets a chance to increase the original bid and thus the purchase price stays lower than it might have otherwise.

On the other hand (there's always another hand), the prevalence of sniping may result in higher prices because you have to truly put in your max bid to make sure you don't lose to another sniper because you don't have the chance to rebid as you would without sniping. For example, there is a pair of Alden suede chukkas (size 7D) [blatant attempt to prevent other SF members from bidding against me] that I'd really like. I put in my snipe bid when they were first listed. I've subsequently increased the amount of my bid even though there is only one low bid on the item because I don't want to lose these to another sniper (at least at a price between by original snipe and my increased price).

I think sniping may create the appearance of lower prices, but I'm not sure if it's really true.


It is very simple - in a perfectly rational world (in which all the bidders are rational) - there is no difference whether people snipe or not. Auction theory predicts that the guy for which the item is most valueable will win with the highest bid.
However, since we are not in such a world, we observe these bidding wars which in many cases result in what is referred to as "winner's curse" and other irrational behaviors (all of which benefit the seller)
By using a snipper you make sure that you are rational, as well as making sure that the other rational people around don't get any leads for bidding wars.
post #22 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buster
It is very simple - in a perfectly rational world (in which all the bidders are rational) - there is no difference whether people snipe or not. Auction theory predicts that the guy for which the item is most valueable will win with the highest bid.
However, since we are not in such a world, we observe these bidding wars which in many cases result in what is referred to as "winner's curse" and other irrational behaviors (all of which benefit the seller)
By using a snipper you make sure that you are rational, as well as making sure that the other rational people around don't get any leads for bidding wars.

You sound like an economist.

I use a sniper because it removes the emotion from bidding. I set the auction price when I am deciding with the clock running. For the most part, I am rational when I set the price. Sellers would not want sniping because, as stated, it removes the potential extra money they would've received when people get in a bidding war. I have no sympathy for this because any extra money they get from a bidding war is windfall anyway. The other reason is that if an auction closes in the middle of the day and I'm in class, I can still bid on it and get a good price. I don't want to reveal all my cards until the last minute. Lastly, many people are using it, so it's just the natural progression of competition.
post #23 of 48
I think I am missing something here...I snipe but don't use one of these programs. I have one browser tab open on the item's listing, constantly reloading the page to keep up with the time. On the other browser tab, I have it at the last step before placing the bid, the click here to confirm your bid. As soon as the clock gets down to 5 or 10 seconds, I switch over to the confirm bid tab and place my bid.
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
I think I am missing something here...I snipe but don't use one of these programs. I have one browser tab open on the item's listing, constantly reloading the page to keep up with the time. On the other browser tab, I have it at the last step before placing the bid, the click here to confirm your bid. As soon as the clock gets down to 5 or 10 seconds, I switch over to the confirm bid tab and place my bid.

You are sniping! But you are doing it manually. This thread has been discussing Sniping Programs that do it automatically. The advantage is that the snipe will go through, even when you are not on the computer.

I have tried to snipe manually too. And many times the bid will not go through at the very end of the auction. Also, by sniping automatically, you are taking the emotion out of the auction. Theoretically, with Snipe Programs, you can set up your Snipe with your maximum bid, and then forget about it. This is preferable to watching the auction till the last minute and then sniping manually. That way there's a good chance you might get caught in a bidding war or bid more than you initially wanted to, when the auction was listed.
post #25 of 48
I have used auctionsniper.com for several years. It is great for me since I don't have to remember when to bid. I set my maximum amount and forget it. I don't get into bidding wars.


Cuff
post #26 of 48
ahh i see. thanks i'll check it out then.
post #27 of 48
Thread Starter 
I definitely have been screwed in bidding wars, although more often I am the one pushing the price up 100s of dollars and then pulling out. I got auctionsniper for 2 reasons - 1, I literally used to get breathless with my heart pounding as the auction ended, which struck me as ridiculous, and 2 - I'm too busy to sit like that for all the auctions I want, especially overseas ones.
post #28 of 48
Well - I will spell it out to you - seller dont like it, as generally the final price is a lot lower than would be achieved if it was a standard auction...i thought that was quite obvious???

Buyer like it, as they can set the price they want to pay, without other buyers seeing the general trend of the auction price....its a lot easier to buy for a low price.

e.g. I bought an immaculate & genuine Hugo Boss suit for £7.26 last week, by sniping.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mano
Why would a seller hate it if it sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?

Why would buyers (who don't use it) like it if sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?
post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
If anyone knows of a freeware program that works even if you are not on-line, please post it's name.
That's not physically possible. Not online = no way to transmit bid to ebay.
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpemberton
Well - I will spell it out to you - seller dont like it, as generally the final price is a lot lower than would be achieved if it was a standard auction...i thought that was quite obvious???

Buyer like it, as they can set the price they want to pay, without other buyers seeing the general trend of the auction price....its a lot easier to buy for a low price.

e.g. I bought an immaculate & genuine Hugo Boss suit for £7.26 last week, by sniping.

I'm still not certain that sniping does anything but impact those few auctions where a bidding war MIGHT have broken out.

Sellers are not the only people who hate sniping. The most vocal opponents of sniping are the buyers that don't use a sniping services. Why do they complain? Because they lose to snipers. And, why do they lose to snipers? Because they bid at a lower maximum price than that which sniper was willing to pay.

Note that the eBay's "maximum bid" system prevents snipers from having any real advantage because someone who placed a conventional bid at a higher maximum price than the sniper will still win the auction. Accordingly, the complaints from buyers about sniping are complaints about not maximizing the price to the seller. Sniping appears to benefit the sellers in such instances.

There are some verying interesting academic articles being published regarding eBay auctions. I haven't seen any regarding sniping, but there I read one recently that focused on the impact of the opening price and final price. For items that could expect bids from a number of sellers, price was maximized with a low opening price. For items expecting little traffic, a high opening price was necessary.
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