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Restaurants with Dress Codes: Take Back The Night! - Page 5

post #61 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by sw20 View Post
Who are the world's wealthiest guys and what's their daily office attire?

Neither tech kings in SiliconValley (even elderly guys like Jobs or Ellison) nor most <50yo hedge fund kings in MidtownManhattan or Greenwich or SF (or London) ever wear ties to office, let alone to dinner...ties are for low-income Luddites mired in 20th century attire....even jackets are largely ornamental as wealthy traders or engineers don't wear jackets while at their desk nor while driving self to office/dinner in own Mercedes 65 (not via dumpy S550 or cab or mass transit or walking)

At Daniel/Per Se, etc those wearing ties are almost always codgers and/or lower-income salesguys of some sort (i.e., investment bankers, CEOs, lawyers, media execs, etc)

Do you mind posting what the world's wealthiest guys order so I can at least eat like them when Willy Loman and I go to Per Se?
post #62 of 202
OP, what percentage of SF posters could routinely drop $300 on a meal ? I think you are naive about the finances of people who elect to get into clothing.
post #63 of 202
I'm surprised by the lack of cohesive standards some members have. I, personally, would not like to make an effort on an evening out only to be surrounded by people eating with their hands, wearing swimming trunks and a tank top. Sure, an extreme comparison, yet one which evidences that standards DO apply; some being higher than others. A mix of Michelin Star restaurants here in the UK adhere to a 'jacket for dinner' standard. Alternatively, 'members clubs' of any repute will usually apply a dress policy as well. I'm all for it, wear whatever you want in front of the TV, but don't expect to carry that mentality in the company of others. Why have men become so timid as to not expect anything of one another?
post #64 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by sw20 View Post
ties are for low-income Luddites mired in 20th century attire
Very amusing. Do you enjoy writing fiction? I think you do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sw20 View Post
Neither tech kings in SiliconValley ... nor most <50yo hedge fund kings in MidtownManhattan or Greenwich or SF (or London) ever wear ties to office, let alone to dinner...

Of course -- as I'm sure you know -- money does not equal class in this day and age. I certainly don't look up to or respect people because they are high earners. Does anyone? A high earner is someone who has mastered a certain aspect of business that allows him or her a great income ... but that's all it tells us. S/he may know next to nothing at all about the rest of the world ... and may even be quite crass. I don't want to be in proximity to that type of person.

Even when money is what is being considered ... after a certain point how much money one has is pointless. I don't care if one earms a measley $1M a year or nice fat $1B a year ... either can afford any restaurant in this country every day of the year if s/he so chooses.
post #65 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post
Big +1 to this. I have been out to many restaurants in a suit. I could care less if the other patrons were wearing suits or nice dresses.

Not to be annoying, but I am committed to correcting its improper use wherever or whenever I see it - the expression is "I couldn't care less." Think about it....
post #66 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddieriley View Post
Not to be annoying, but I am committed to correcting its improper use wherever or whenever I see it - the expression is "I couldn't care less." Think about it....

I complement you for your efforts.
post #67 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
You guys honestly care how other people dress?

You are talking more generally here, I take it, and not just in the context of restaurants? I'd feel uncomfortably narcissistic to obsess so much about my own appearance if I didn't appreciate good dress in the rest of the world.
post #68 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBreinin View Post
I don't know if I agree. Sure, for every truly great restaurant, there are 20 crappy places directed to tourists...but there are some really special places. Don't know if you still live here, but there are some wonderul new restaurants that have sprung up since Katrina. I think New Orleans is one of the country's best food destinations.
It's okay to disagree. And I wouldn't disagree about there being some really special places in and around New Orleans. I also think that New Orleans is a food destination ... yet still I don't think that many of its restaurants are truly oustanding. It's more about the local (Creole) or nearby (Cajun) cuisine.

I no longer live in Louisiana on a permanent basis ... but I do maintain a residence in New Orleans ... and am there frequently. I was last there in December and in October ... for a week each visit.
post #69 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
Even when money is what is being considered ... after a certain point how much money one has is pointless. I don't care if one earms a measley $1M a year or nice fat $1B a year ... either can afford any restaurant in this country every day of the year if s/he so chooses.
sw20 is interesting, in that he is literally disgusted by anyone who doesn't live exactly where he lives, own the same car as he owns, hold the same job as he has or have the same Howard Hughes-like obsession with cleanliness as he has. On the other, he does give insights into the morés among some who are currently ascendant in the business world.
post #70 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
It's okay to disagree. And I wouldn't disagree about there being some really special places in and around New Orleans. I also think that New Orleans is a food destination ... yet still I don't think that many of its restaurants are truly oustanding. It's more about the local (Creole) or nearby (Cajun) cuisine.

I no longer live in Louisiana on a permanent basis ... but I do maintain a residence in New Orleans ... and am there frequently. I was last there in December and in October ... for a week each visit.

It may not be all that in terms of haute cuisine, but NO has 2 great, authentic regional cuisines which puts it 2 up on most areas in the US. I always enjoy eating there, from po' boy stands on up.
post #71 of 202
For Washington, DC, check out this article by Tom Sietsema, the food critic for Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...062900980.html
post #72 of 202
The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island in Michigan requires a coat and tie.

http://www.grandhotel.com/dining/dining-overview
post #73 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by forsbergacct2000 View Post
The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island in Michigan requires a coat and tie.

http://www.grandhotel.com/dining/dining-overview
The Greenbriar and Homestead do also as do most resorts. Many private clubs such as the Cosmos in DC require a coat and tie anytime you are in the public areas on the premises.
post #74 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by courty View Post
I could not disagree more. Certainly there are many that are overrated. Brennan's comes to mind. Not because there is anything particularly wrong with the food but because (sticking with the topic) there is only so much I am willing to spend for breakfast when seated next to people wearing t-shirts, shorts, and sandals. But New Orleans is a great restaurant town and I am not sure I have ever had a truly awful meal anywhere there, which is something I cannot say about other parts of the world. Places like Galatoire's, La Crepe Nanou, Clancy's, Upperline, and Cafe Degas, are consistently good every time I visit. Antoine's may have seen better days but I have heard good things about it recently. A dress code is simply a part of the decor and general restaurant experience. There are many places that serve great food from very simple surroundings and I do not expect the patrons' dress to be any more elaborate. What I dislike is a place that has all the trappings of grand dining - including the menu and prices - with diners that look like the walked in from the beach or golf course.
Your freedom ends where my nose begins. This may be antithetical to what most SF members believe in, but if an establishment cares more about the superficial elements (e.g. dress code), then I will simply take my business elsewhere. I go to restaurants for food -- good quality food that is unique and nice. And while I certainly enjoy dressing up a little, I can relate to the other side of the story. I would certainly be more than a little peeved off if someone insisted that I wear a particular piece of attire to make them feel better. An excellent example is a tie. I hate wearing ties whilst dining, and aside from the complete pointlessness of the tie other than as a decorative accessory, I would be ticked off if it were to be a required element to make some schmuck feel better about the ambiance. Really?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
Of course -- as I'm sure you know -- money does not equal class in this day and age. I certainly don't look up to or respect people because they are high earners. Does anyone? A high earner is someone who has mastered a certain aspect of business that allows him or her a great income ... but that's all it tells us. S/he may know next to nothing at all about the rest of the world ... and may even be quite crass. I don't want to be in proximity to that type of person.
Indeed. I would argue further that judging a person's class by their clothes is a ridiculous notion at best. You may as well judge a person's class by the car they drive, the watch they wear, or the shampoo that they use.
post #75 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlin View Post
Indeed. I would argue further that judging a person's class by their clothes is a ridiculous notion at best. You may as well judge a person's class by the car they drive, the watch they wear, or the shampoo that they use.
Agree competely. That said ... I still do appreciate it when people dress -- and at least act -- the part for certain establishments. But given the choice of being seated next to well-dressed & crass or poorly-dressed & well-mannered ... I'd choose the later.

I'll always recall sitting next to a well-dressed couple at the Four Seasons in New York. Within minutes of their being seated ... the man decided the time was right to tell his wife of many years that he was leaving her for "a babe" half her age.
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