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Restaurants with Dress Codes: Take Back The Night! - Page 8

post #106 of 202
Metlin ... I'm in agreement with much of what you have to say ... but not at 100%

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlin View Post
Social pressure, pure and simple, will work its magic.
To a degree yes ... but it only really works in an insular community ... which is fortunate for most. Most people dining in restaurants will never again see one another ... and will never be introduced in any way that social pressure comes into play. Now I'm not saying that's a bad thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlin View Post
Ahh, but are they more outstanding than the latter category?
The few that come to mind are indeed among the best ... but the best also includes restaurants without a code ... probably more without a code. I've never really stopped to take count (I don't have to worry as I'm always wearing a coat). In fact I don't think I've offered any to be added to the thread.

I will say this ... the clubs of which I'm a member each have a code of dress ... have had it for years now. Two offer food that could have been included on Stanley Marcus' Less Than the Best List. There is, however, one that is a true exception.

EDIT AGAIN: Sorry fellows ... I have a plane leaving in an hour and have to get going. I might be able to join you again when I'm in the air. Then again, flying puts me to sleep.
post #107 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Jack View Post
Why have men become so timid as to not expect anything of one another?

Men have become too timid to be men.
post #108 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBugatti View Post
Foo, you and your fellow young, brash, iconoclast whippersnappers (and don't tell me for a minute you don't care how others dress!!!) could learn something from this gent:

Whether the loosening of dress codes signals a bad development for society is a separate issue from whether the way others dress directly affects my experiences. It's sad that society seems to grow less and less elegant, but it's ultimately others' loss. I don't need a restaurant to dictate a standard for me--I'm perfectly capable of putting on a jacket and tie of my own volition.

I come to Styleforum to discuss ideas for my own personal gain, not to appreciate how others dress or tell them how to. Selfish and self-centered? Of course, but this is a hobby of luxury to me, so that should go without say.
post #109 of 202
Wiltons, in London, used to be jacket and tie compulsary during the week. For the weekend it was ok to go without tie

This has now changed to 'jacket required' (and sadly Wiltons is no longer open during the weekend). Can't recall a single restaurant in London which still insists on jacket and tie (outside private members clubs)

Standards of dress have deteriorated significantly over the last decade. It used to be very rare for diners at a Michelin star restaurant not to wear jacket and tie. Now, especially on the weekend, it is very rare.

Interestingly the decline in standards seems to be a uniquely male affliction. Among the couples I see dining at the better London restaurants most of the women are dressed up to the nines, whereas the men wear jeans and a shirt (often untucked). It is the lack of symmetry that bothers me more than anything else
post #110 of 202
I think it's fine to have certain rules where deemed neccessary. So if a restaurant has a dress code and people don't want to follow it, then that's fine but they should go somewhere else. What I don't like is people using the term 'lowest common denominator' to describe someone who wears jeans and a t-shirt, for example. Amongst some people it's almost as though there is something wrong with you if you don't dress up all the time to go out for a meal. It's a matter of choice, that's all.
post #111 of 202
While lowest common denominator has a lot of bias, there is some truth in the sense that everything moves in one direction.

Suit wearers have not invaded fast-food restaurants and demanded that they require jackets.

But those who dislike dressing up did indeed push for the abolition of dress codes.

I don't mind many nice restaurants having no dress code, but I wish a few more did. I would sometimes like to dress up, with my wife, and go somewhere where other people are also dressed up.
post #112 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post
I assume that everyone here has an interest in tailored clothing. Is it so wrong to want an excuse to wear it once in a while? You would -- or at least I would

I know I do...
post #113 of 202
Marcel's in DC.

I biked there, got into an accident, and ruined a brand new pair of gloves. Everyone said "better the glove than your hand" but I'm not sure I feel that way. You guys would understand.
post #114 of 202
The jacket and tie is one thing, but what women get away with wearing is kind of bullshit if you ask me. Fancy restaurants and the workplace alike.
post #115 of 202
The Greenbrier's Main Dining room http://www.greenbrier.com/dining/The...ning-Room.aspx Dress: Breakfast: Resort casual attire, including collared sport shirts, sweaters, jackets, dress slacks and walking shorts. Dinner: Business formal attire, including jacket and tie required for gentlemen; dresses or evening suits for ladies. Children 10 and older are asked to wear attire similar to that of adults. and Prime 44 although no tie is required http://www.greenbrier.com/dining/Prime-44-West.aspx and in Charleston: The Chop House http://www.thechophouserestaurant.com/ and Laury's (no website) and close by in Huntington: Savannah's (Excellent!) http://www.savannahsmenu.com/
post #116 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
The jacket and tie is one thing, but what women get away with wearing is kind of bullshit if you ask me. Fancy restaurants and the workplace alike.
I don't disagree, but, generally, when you tell a woman you're taking her out to dinner, she dresses for the occasion. It'd be nice if men did the same.
post #117 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post
I don't disagree, but, generally, when you tell a woman you're taking her out to dinner, she dresses for the occasion.

It'd be nice if men did the same.

Agreed. Grown men like to dress like teenagers nowadays.
post #118 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Whether the loosening of dress codes signals a bad development for society is a separate issue from whether the way others dress directly affects my experiences. It's sad that society seems to grow less and less elegant, but it's ultimately others' loss. I don't need a restaurant to dictate a standard for me--I'm perfectly capable of putting on a jacket and tie of my own volition.

I come to Styleforum to discuss ideas for my own personal gain, not to appreciate how others dress or tell them how to. Selfish and self-centered? Of course, but this is a hobby of luxury to me, so that should go without say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarim View Post
Agreed. Grown men like to dress like teenagers nowadays.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
The jacket and tie is one thing, but what women get away with wearing is kind of bullshit if you ask me. Fancy restaurants and the workplace alike.

Foo, some may not need to be told how to dress, but many men and women do, unfortunately, as the two following quotes note as well. Hence, the restaurant dining code has been an attempt to allow those of us who enjoy dining among the civilized to continue to do so.

If you can stomach going to a fine restaurant and sit next to a grown man in shorts and flip flops while you are in a suit spending $300+ per person, I guess that's your choice--perhaps you don't mind eating at the table by the restrooms either... but many of us (as has been noted above) prefer to dine in an environment which is inviting to all the senses, and not just taste.
post #119 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBugatti View Post
Some may not need to be told how to dress, but many men and women do, unfortunately. Hence, the restaurant dining code has been an attempt to allow those of us who enjoy dining among the civilized to continue to do so.

If you can stomach going to a fine restaurant and sit next to a grown man in shorts and flip flops while you are in a suit spending $300+ per person, I guess that's your choice--perhaps you don't mind eating at the table by the restrooms either... but many of us (as has been noted above) prefer to dine in an environment which is inviting to all the senses, and not just taste.

Why are you quoting me like I am knocking it? I wear a suit 7 days a week, it is a non-issue. I just think that women get away with wearing awfully casual clothes under strict dress codes.
post #120 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Why are you quoting me like I am knocking it? I wear a suit 7 days a week, it is a non-issue. I just think that women get away with wearing awfully casual clothes under strict dress codes.

You are not mocking it--I was quoting you to make my point. I agree with you; dressing poorly is not just the purview of men. Women dress horribly as well, and often have no sense of what is appropriate for the occasion. I was really answering Foo, and using your quote as an answer.

Sorry for any misunderstanding.

EDIT: NOTE: I just edited my post #118 above to clarify.
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