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Best Chef's Cookbook? - Page 2

post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post
The French Laundry Cookbook by Thomas Keller

Wouldn't recommend it unless you are extremely well set up and have some pretty serious chops.
post #17 of 51
Larousse Gastronomique.
post #18 of 51
Lidia Bastianich

Ive heard marc vetri has a good cookbook but yet to get it.
post #19 of 51
+100 for Simply French. For Italian cooking, I favor Marcella Hazan.
post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
I just got that book today, actually. I wanted some reading for this cold month ahead of me and I've been meaning to buy these books forever, I read them everytime I go so I figured it was time to cop:
It's interesting, for sure, but if you want to cook anything from it you will need to fill your cabinets with various cooking chemicals that are, in the long run, pretty useless at home and some odd equipment that is hard to find. It's not really meant to be used as a cookbook for home.
post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
Wouldn't recommend it unless you are extremely well set up and have some pretty serious chops.

+1

TFL is interesting, but it's a pain to cook out of on any sort of regular basis. Bouchon is great though, and i use it quite often.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BC2012 View Post
Depending on your level of comfort in the kitchen, Ina Garten's books are generally quite good.

http://www.amazon.com/Barefoot-Conte...4453366&sr=8-2

This one has a bunch of easy, solid recipes for the medium-level cook. It's not Thomas Keller but it is a book full of recipes you'll be able to make and generally wow guests with.

Ina Garten's books are the ones I recommend to people who ask my opinion of a good cook book. The best part is that the recipes actually work as written. In other words, they are tested recipes. I'm a chef turned chef-instructor and I can't recommend her books enough for home cooks. I've yet to make a dish out of her books that wasn't really good. Certainly not advanced recipes, but very solid.
post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
It's interesting, for sure, but if you want to cook anything from it you will need to fill your cabinets with various cooking chemicals that are, in the long run, pretty useless at home and some odd equipment that is hard to find. It's not really meant to be used as a cookbook for home.

I don't have a kitchen big enough to even worry about attempting this stuff... the books are nice brain food though.

A read of the Fat Duck book and you can probably surmise that Blumenthal regularly jerks off in the front of the mirror, though.
post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
I don't have a kitchen big enough to even worry about attempting this stuff... the books are nice brain food though.

A read of the Fat Duck book and you can probably surmise that Blumenthal regularly jerks off in the front of the mirror, though.
You say that like it isn't normal.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
You say that like it isn't normal.

I usually have to use the mirror to find it, but once found, I don't need the mirror to help me finish the job.
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by cryan1980 View Post
Lidia Bastianich Ive heard marc vetri has a good cookbook but yet to get it.
Vetri is an awesome restaurant, as is its sister restaurant, Osteria. Nice guy, too. I've heard his book is good, but not great - hard to make a lot of the recipes and they don't always come out. For the curious: http://www.amazon.com/II-Viaggio-Vet.../dp/1580088880
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

A read of the Fat Duck book and you can probably surmise that Blumenthal regularly jerks off in the front of the mirror, though.

yet that stuff, when done correctly (not that I ever have myself), is incredibly awesome. Snail porridge was easily one of the single greatest dishes I've ever had at any restaurant.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
yet that stuff, when done correctly (not that I ever have myself), is incredibly awesome. Snail porridge was easily one of the single greatest dishes I've ever had at any restaurant.
I don't think he jerked off into the porridge.
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I don't think he jerked off into the porridge.

if he did I'd still try to re-create it
post #30 of 51
So if one admittedly has little experience cooking, I'm assuming none of these books make any sense, right?
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