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Studying language in college? - Page 4

post #46 of 55
if you plan to live/work in the US, learn spanish. eventually it will be as common as english. if you plan to live somewhere abroad then learning russian or some other language might be worth it.
post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by aphextwin07 View Post
if you plan to live/work in the US, learn spanish. eventually it will be as common as english. if you plan to live somewhere abroad then learning russian or some other language might be worth it.

Based on what?
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Lucid dialogue with the French really sours the experience.

this actually made me tear up laughing. sigged.
post #49 of 55
How many people actually come out of school after studying a language can actually say that they're fluent in the language?

I use Spanish just about everyday at my job and like to think my Spanish is pretty decent but when we get away from the "normal" topics discussed at work my fluency level drops.
post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BP348 View Post
How many people actually come out of school after studying a language can actually say that they're fluent in the language?

I use Spanish just about everyday at my job and like to think my Spanish is pretty decent but when we get away from the "normal" topics discussed at work my fluency level drops.

I took Spanish through Spanish 202 (Spanish V) and I could barely keep up with a 5 year old, is my guess.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BP348 View Post
How many people actually come out of school after studying a language can actually say that they're fluent in the language?

+1. Unless you are part of an immersion program or unless you undertake a year or more of university exchange in the country, I think that the vast majority of people (from an English-language background, at least) will not be fluent at all.

Of course, the number of people who claim to be fluent after studying eight or ten language subjects at university is quite high, particularly when they are applying for jobs...
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Based on what?

... seriously?
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
The first thing I associate with Russia is happily enriched people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Lucid dialogue with the French really sours the experience.

You're on today!
post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by spb_lady View Post
I'm from a weird country where enriching once spirit is valued much higher than enriching once wallet, and where high school has nothing in common with real life and business processes. That's why I studied philosophy and social sciences at the University in order to get good education and after started to work in the field I wanted without any idea how is it inside and what really my job will look like. And you know what? I'm doing pretty well. I'm just learning fast. My father was brilliant at science. He studied medicine and neurobiology, stayed at the university after he graduated, was teaching and doing science research. Being pretty happy till the Soviet Union died and he realized that he has a wife and 2 small children, but has no money and no place to live. It was a difficult choice for him, but he wanted to feed us sometimes, so he left science and started to study trading and finance. Himself. 3 years after he was invited to teach this at the university as well. He is now one of the best financial analysts in the country. What I'm saying here is that I do believe that smart and educated people can be successful in nearly any field they want (may be excluding some very specialized fields... though I have some examples as well). They just have enough learning skills and mental power for this. As to the people who specialized on the right nostril in order to get a job, I'm not so sure. Imo, your desire to improve your thinking is a good one, just know you can do that w/ any language or other field. Just an opinion.
+1 Too often we tend to value what we think is "useful" or "practical." But we are shortsighted, so these things we think are useful or practical often aren't. To the OP and other undergrads: Do what you love. Worry about a job later. If you do what you love, you'll work hard at it, become good at it, and be rewarded for it (w/ a job, money, etc.). If you just choose your major because you think it'll give you a job and money, you'll end up hating your job and eventually switching careers anyway. It's not that jobs or money aren't good or necessary. Just don't make them your focus.
post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by aphextwin07 View Post
... seriously?
Ignoring the fact that 85% of Americans speak English as a first language, the incentive to learn English will always be higher for Spanish speakers than the incentive for English speakers to learn Spanish. Any assumed level of bilingual interchangeability based on demographic shifts would be ignoring the fact that an influx of Spanish speaking families and children would still be forced out of necessity (job prospects) and habit (English teaching schools) to learn English to compensate, which is not reflexive among native English speakers.
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