or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Studying language in college?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Studying language in college? - Page 3

post #31 of 55
I took russian for 2 years at the start of my undergrad. It's a tricky language (full disclaimer: I'm fluent in french and english but no case-based languages. a case-based one may help), and I felt that while the instruction was good, there's no way I'll be able to retain it without going to russia. I would look into exchange programs, terms abroad, etc, because my classmates who have done so are miles ahead of those of us who didn't. I'm definitely going over there when I finish my undergrad. It's a great language but the class-based way you learn in in a university is a little lacking. Put in the effort (GO TO RUSSIA!) and your time/effort will actually pay off.

In terms of whether it will contribute to your liberal arts experience, I feel that those who seek a liberal arts education value learning a variety of modes of thinking, including language. I see immense benefit from taking russian. Just don't expect to be reading the classics after your second year.
post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by spb_lady View Post
can't wait to encourage you to study useless russian language
not useless for me. There is a practical reason for me to learn it. I wouldn't devote four years of my life to it, nor would I devote four years of tuition fees (or decades of student debt) to it either. I'd probably download a Pimsleur course and listen every morning or something. I'd never be arguing interpretations of Tolstoy with Russians, but I'd get around Mui Ne pretty well...
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt View Post
nor would I devote four years of tuition fees (or decades of student debt) to it either

my education was free by the way may be it partly explains difference in our views on the subject.
post #34 of 55
It's a good idea, better than many majors. Russian in particular is great, although I happen to have been blessed with a natural accent, perhaps via cultural memory. Milpool is incorrect. Can cite examples.
post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by spb_lady View Post
my education was free by the way may be it partly explains difference in our views on the subject.
mine was heavily subsidised too, that's Australia. OP is going to a 'small liberal arts' college. To my understanding of the US system, this typically means expensive...although any American on the board is free to correct me on that.
post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt View Post
mine was heavily subsidised too, that's Australia. OP is going to a 'small liberal arts' college. To my understanding of the US system, this typically means expensive...although any American on the board is free to correct me on that.

nah, they're all expensive.
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mharwitt View Post
nah, they're all expensive.
Yep. Some are just WAY more expensive than others.
post #38 of 55
The practicality of learning Russian aside, would learning Russian be so much harder than learning English? As a native Dutchman I started reading English novels at around age 12-14 (I forget) and have read many since. I'm sure I'll never acquire a native speaking/writing level (of a similary educated and aged Englishman/American), but my passive reading skills are good enough so I'm mostly affected in speed, not comprehension. Although there's the different alphabet as an extra hurdle, starting out, I can't think of a real reason why wmmk couldn't acquire similar skills in Russian given proper exposure and a decent dictionary.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mharwitt View Post
Milpool is incorrect.

As I am searching for a new job, I certainly hope you are correct.
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDFS View Post
The practicality of learning Russian aside, would learning Russian be so much harder than learning English?

As a native Dutchman I started reading English novels at around age 12-14 (I forget) and have read many since. I'm sure I'll never acquire a native speaking/writing level (of a similary educated and aged Englishman/American), but my passive reading skills are good enough so I'm mostly affected in speed, not comprehension.

Although there's the different alphabet as an extra hurdle, starting out, I can't think of a real reason why wmmk couldn't acquire similar skills in Russian given proper exposure and a decent dictionary.


I only know how to say "comrade" and "good morning" in Russian, so take my comments with a grain of salt.

However, Russian does have a reputation for being quite a difficult language to learn.
For someone from a non-English-speaking background, so does English.
But here's the key - the OP is a native English speaker, so he picked up English with his mother's milk - therefore, it came to him naturally and would not have been very difficult for him.

Learning a language from birth - whilst immersed in that language - and learning a second language at college whilst hearing it for only a few hours a week are two very different things.
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by spb_lady View Post
I'm from a weird country where enriching once spirit is valued much higher than enriching once wallet.

The first thing I associate with Russia is happily enriched people.
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDFS View Post
The practicality of learning Russian aside, would learning Russian be so much harder than learning English?

As a native Dutchman I started reading English novels at around age 12-14 (I forget) and have read many since. I'm sure I'll never acquire a native speaking/writing level (of a similary educated and aged Englishman/American), but my passive reading skills are good enough so I'm mostly affected in speed, not comprehension.

Although there's the different alphabet as an extra hurdle, starting out, I can't think of a real reason why wmmk couldn't acquire similar skills in Russian given proper exposure and a decent dictionary.

you're dutch, he's american. americans just don't seem to be able to learn languages.
post #43 of 55
I had a friend who did a BA and MBA in something practical, but every summer from the year before freshman till graduation from graduate school, he spent in a different language immersion program.

he could talk to a secretary or taxi driver in 7 or 8 languages. that was the perfect way to learn languages, in my opinion.
post #44 of 55
I think it is really cool to speak more than one language. English is a very important language and you can use English everywhere but it also great to speak German in Germany, French in France and Spanish in Spain.
post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinny View Post
it's also great to speak French in France

Lucid dialogue with the French really sours the experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Studying language in college?