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Ridiculous Fedex Charges - Page 3

post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post
I don't think you quite take my point.

First, has anyone ever ordered a tie and then engaged in a lengthy discussion of incoterms with the seller? I doubt it. On the contrary, the seller charges you shipping and you expect that the tie will arrive at your door. Sometimes, particularly careful sellers will say something about how taxes and duties are the responsibility of the buyer.

But the point that I am making is that the shipper has made a deal with delivery company to deliver your goods. So the contract is between the shipper and the delivery company. You might be a beneficiary of that contract but you are not a party to the contract.

So, if push comes to shove, I doubt that you are contractually obligated to pay the bill the delivery company sends you. There may well be other legal theories that the delivery company could invoke, especially to collect customs duties actually paid to the government. But, in a very real sense, I suspect the shipping companies know that they would have a tough time actually forcing you to pay their "clearance fees" and are just trying it on.

If you don't want to just ignore the bill, one trick you might try for fun is sending the delivery company an "accord and satisfaction" for just the actual customs duties. Check how to do this correctly in the appropriate jurisdiction.

Once again, none of this is legal advice. Do not rely on it for anything whatsoever in any jurisdiction anywhere in the world or its subsidiaries.

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
I've used Royal Mail with good results as well. As regards tracking, though, it's only ever been tracked up to departing the UK, not the USA.

Once it departs the UK, you can use that same tracking number on the USPS site.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by zippyh View Post
Once it departs the UK, you can use that same tracking number on the USPS site.

This.

It should show up on USPS, unless somehow they forget to scan it (which I've experienced a few times)
post #34 of 43
Royal Mail International Signed For Small Packets is a very reliable and speedy service, with insurance available at extra cost. There's a weight max of 2kg, but suits are generally about 1.7kg. Insurance tops out at a maximum of £500 though, which would be a problem for anything more expensive. Tracking is so-so. Generally superb until it leaves the UK, then it's up to US services to maintain updates on the USPS site, and they are quite patchy as FidelCashflow says (Canada Post do the same thing for items sent to them with this service). Also, occasionally, items can sometimes sit in NYC customs for up to a week. Usually delivery is about 5 weekdays though. Reliability is pretty good; I've had to claim on 2 items I think, having sent out several hundred plus items when I was reselling stuff frequently a while back. Claims take forever to be processed, but they pay in the end.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post
Doing your own brokerage isn't exactly an easy solution unless you live close to the main hub where the package was received into your country.
You can do your own brokerage at your city dispatch center (usually only one per large city, situated next to the airport). It doesn't have to be the point of entry into your country (at least it's the case for canada). Did this in the past quite a few times (poor student concept) and however frustrating paying brokerage may be, it's a big pain in the ass to do this. In case anyone is wondering, doing your own brokerage involves filling out a one-pager that's very similar to the sheet you fill out when sending a package international with regular mail. Carriers probably make 98% gross margin on brokerage fee so it's in their best interest to make this option as unattractive as possible. It's really easy to argue against a bill received after you received the items (self brokerage being unavailable), be ready to spent a LONG TIME on the phone though. Now that i don't have an unlimited supply of free time anymore, i make sure to use regular mail or express shipping. I've notice that some european retailers (Yoox, LVR) have been including duty / custom / brokerage into their prices. let's hope that more retailers follow this trend.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redwoood View Post
When you use Fedex' "express" service level, brokerage is included. For "Ground" or whatever the bottom-tier overseas method is, it is not. You can also call ahead to give them your CC number for your customs charges. This way you avoid additional fees they charge since they effectively front you money. http://fedex.com/ca_english/internat...brokerage.html
Are you sure about this? I receive packages from Italy and each time get assessed duty plus a flat $50 brokerage (I don't have the invoice in front of me but it says something about payment advance, like you describe). I've asked FedEx on two occasions whether if I can pre-pay or have my CC on file to avoid this and they said no. The link you gave is for Canada; I tried contacting the US equivalent of FedEx Trade Networks and they said they only handle packages over 150 lbs, and that I would have to call the FedEx main line, which I did previously.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post
Fedex has charged me close to 30% of the value of some fabric I had delivered from the UK as their 'brokerage and other' fees.

Given that I am expecting a few suits delivered from London next month, can someone suggest a carrier that would not charge me such fees. Would Royal Mail / USPS be the best option?

Naturally, I'm happy to pay the legitimate customs fees, just not these frivolous corporate charges.

Thanks,
ET

For a second I thought you were from Canada. We get screwed by Fed Ex and UPS with "brokerage fees" when we purchase stuff abroad, contrast that with Canada Post only charging $5 for the same thing.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post
The boys at FDX just charged me $155 on a 600E order from Grandi & Rubinelli - highway robbery! Though for some reason, they only billed me 15 days after the package was delivered - I'm tempted to just ignore this charge given that I wasn't notified beforehand, but the do have my SSN and I'm afraid to take the hit to my FICO.

Crooks.

In the past I've called Fedex and disputed such a charge because they are required to give the recipient an opportunity to refuse the package if they don't want to pay customs. I'm actually in the process of disputing another one now.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post
Are you sure about this? I receive packages from Italy and each time get assessed duty plus a flat $50 brokerage (I don't have the invoice in front of me but it says something about payment advance, like you describe). I've asked FedEx on two occasions whether if I can pre-pay or have my CC on file to avoid this and they said no. The link you gave is for Canada; I tried contacting the US equivalent of FedEx Trade Networks and they said they only handle packages over 150 lbs, and that I would have to call the FedEx main line, which I did previously.

You're right, sorry. They must have checked a cookie or something because they sent me to the Canada site when I did my search. So, yeah, if you are importing into Canada, the information about service levels is correct. The information on their US site is quite sparse. You may have to call them to get any information.

With regard to prepaying, you have to call them once the shipment is on its way, you can't put it 'on file'. I just checked my records, last time I did it with UPS Canada, not sure if I've ever done it with Fedex Canada. Obviously, I only deal with the Canadian subsidiaries, which have their own rules and regulations.

50$ for brokerage and bond can be quite high depending on the value of the shipment. If you do a lot of importing, you may be able to negotiate with them. Or maybe put down a deposit for future shipments.

Again, I apologize, I should have checked my facts more carefully.
post #40 of 43
UPS is the worst. Satan kicked them out of hell for being too evil.

A few years back I got a phone call.

UPS Your package has arrived.

Me Great

UPS It's going to cost €110

ME But it's supposed to be duty etc free

UPS Yes but it's €110 to fill out the form so you don't have to pay the duty

ME So you want me to pay €110 to not pay the duty?

UPS Yes

ME So how much is the duty etc?

UPS €106

Me So you want me to pay €110 to not pay €106 in duty. A duty I'm not liable for?

UPS Yes.
post #41 of 43
Bad experience with UPS as well. Paid $30 for a $90 order in brokerage fees.
post #42 of 43
Unfortunately, alot of businesses, in particular, those from Northampton, only favor UPS, DHL and the likes as they pick the parcels from the factory. With Royal Mail, someone would need to go to the post office.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Smith View Post
For a second I thought you were from Canada. We get screwed by Fed Ex and UPS with "brokerage fees" when we purchase stuff abroad, contrast that with Canada Post only charging $5 for the same thing.

Yes, we do. I just got screwed over last week by FEDEX.
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