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What do Germans wear? - Page 5

post #61 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan_ View Post
But to tell the dangerous places and situations from the harmless ones I'd have to differentiate more. So one could take that as a rule of thumb. I know I'm a bit too alarming, but better safe than sorry in this case.


Hahahahahahahaa.

Pretty funny, if entirely unjustified.

Sorry Jan, we're not going to agree on this one I'm afraid.
post #62 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuitMyself View Post






And if ignorance would hurt, you would be screaming and crying all day long...
post #63 of 74
post #64 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cravate_Noire View Post
The SS division "Das Reich" is once again prepared to bring terror over Europe:




OK, now that was funny
post #65 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by bck View Post
Hi, all! I'm going be studying abroad in Germany (Stuttgart) this summer. I just want to know what Germans usually wear for formal events, lectures at the university, casual wear, etc. At this point, the only things I'm sure I'm going to pack are: lots and lots of shirts, a couple of jeans, chinos, a blazer, a navy suit, couple of ties, belts, brown oxfords, running shoes, my normal gym attire, and personal furnishings. Basically, my look is sort of American prep. Is there a certain look that Germans tend to go for? Thanks.


I thought I'd answer your question instead of blurring out some random stereotypes: I have studied in Stuttgart myself and assume things have not changed a lot. If you go to Stuttgart University, I guess it will be most likely as an engineering/science/economics student? If so - the typical dress of your peers at school will be casual, but more "stylish" than the average US college student, i.e. replace flip flops, sweatpants and hooded sweat shirts by polo shirts, decent jeans/chinos and urban sneakers. In architecture things will be more sophisticated, in liberal arts (which are not a focus of this school anyway) more "alternative". Professors will also be a bit more formal than in the US: At Stuttgart University the majority of my (engineering) professors wore suit and tie or sport coat and tie on campus, whereas professors with ties seem to be a rare sight at US engineering/science schools. Things will be similar at TU Munich. Overall people in Munich are, however, dressed better than in smaller Stuttgart and also than in the US excl. NYC (comment of my Asian-born wife visiting Munich after years living in the US: "Nice to be in a place where people do not dress crappy").

Dress in business settings depends on the function with engineering being rather informal (jeans...) and finance or general management in traditional companies requiring a suit. I don't think there is a need for a tux unless you wanna go frequently to the opera or ballet (both is highly recommended in Stuttgart and/or Munich)

So and now back to stereotypes...all Germans are Jew-eating Nazis, all Brits stiff and sexually frustrated, all French smell, all Italians are lazy, the Poles steal, and Americans are all overweight, undereducated and can't find their own country on a world map. Did I miss something important?
post #66 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexE View Post
I thought I'd answer your question instead of blurring out some random stereotypes: I have studied in Stuttgart myself and assume things have not changed a lot. If you go to Stuttgart University, I guess it will be most likely as an engineering/science/economics student? If so - the typical dress of your peers at school will be casual, but more "stylish" than the average US college student, i.e. replace flip flops, sweatpants and hooded sweat shirts by polo shirts, decent jeans/chinos and urban sneakers. In architecture things will be more sophisticated, in liberal arts (which are not a focus of this school anyway) more "alternative". Professors will also be a bit more formal than in the US: At Stuttgart University the majority of my (engineering) professors wore suit and tie or sport coat and tie on campus, whereas professors with ties seem to be a rare sight at US engineering/science schools. Things will be similar at TU Munich. Overall people in Munich are, however, dressed better than in smaller Stuttgart and also than in the US excl. NYC (comment of my Asian-born wife visiting Munich after years living in the US: "Nice to be in a place where people do not dress crappy"). Dress in business settings depends on the function with engineering being rather informal (jeans...) and finance or general management in traditional companies requiring a suit. I don't think there is a need for a tux unless you wanna go frequently to the opera or ballet (both is highly recommended in Stuttgart and/or Munich) So and now back to stereotypes...all Germans are Jew-eating Nazis, all Brits stiff and sexually frustrated, all French smell, all Italians are lazy, the Poles steal, and Americans are all overweight, undereducated and can't find their own country on a world map. Did I miss something important?
Yeah, the Japanesians and the Mexicuns and....
post #67 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Yeah, the Japanesians and the Mexicuns and....
Don't forget the Grecians.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post
Hand- not machine embroidered, I'm sure!
Don't you know it!
post #68 of 74
I second the Stuttgart and Munich Opera recommendation.

Stuttgart is not comparable to Munich, but you can have a good time there.

As mentioned above students tend to be a bit more formal
( at least when i attended university in germany).

I really enjoyed my time there, nice people and country!
post #69 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
And you wonder why they don't like you?
Who's "they" and who's "you?"
Quote:
Originally Posted by il_colonnello View Post
Pretty funny, if entirely unjustified. Sorry Jan, we're not going to agree on this one I'm afraid.
Sure, my welcome picture was funnily over the top and I was overgeneralizing with the warning of Muslim places, but how precise could it be when I issue an advice in one sentence? The same generalization would occur when I give him the advice in one sentence to stay away from Eastern Germany if he's of darker skin color. Most places are fine but there's a higher statistical risk to run into problems at certain places with certain people. The same is true for the Muslim ghettos for non-Muslims, especially if they display certain attributes like being Jewish. Once he's in Germany he'll differentiate between my general warning and what's really in place. edit: Here's an address for bck that's full with helpful advice at a glance: http://howtogermany.com/.
post #70 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by il_colonnello View Post
Hahahahahahahaa.

Pretty funny, if entirely unjustified.

Sorry Jan, we're not going to agree on this one I'm afraid.


After having lived in Berlin for some time I must say I somewhat agree with Jan
post #71 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chouse View Post
After having lived in Berlin for some time I must say I somewhat agree with Jan

The OP will certainly not have any problems with crime in the South of Germany. Stuttgart and Munich are very safe (unbelievable safe by US standards).
post #72 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexE View Post
I thought I'd answer your question instead of blurring out some random stereotypes: I have studied in Stuttgart myself and assume things have not changed a lot. If you go to Stuttgart University, I guess it will be most likely as an engineering/science/economics student? If so - the typical dress of your peers at school will be casual, but more "stylish" than the average US college student, i.e. replace flip flops, sweatpants and hooded sweat shirts by polo shirts, decent jeans/chinos and urban sneakers. In architecture things will be more sophisticated, in liberal arts (which are not a focus of this school anyway) more "alternative". Professors will also be a bit more formal than in the US: At Stuttgart University the majority of my (engineering) professors wore suit and tie or sport coat and tie on campus, whereas professors with ties seem to be a rare sight at US engineering/science schools. Things will be similar at TU Munich. Overall people in Munich are, however, dressed better than in smaller Stuttgart and also than in the US excl. NYC (comment of my Asian-born wife visiting Munich after years living in the US: "Nice to be in a place where people do not dress crappy").

Dress in business settings depends on the function with engineering being rather informal (jeans...) and finance or general management in traditional companies requiring a suit. I don't think there is a need for a tux unless you wanna go frequently to the opera or ballet (both is highly recommended in Stuttgart and/or Munich)

So and now back to stereotypes...all Germans are Jew-eating Nazis, all Brits stiff and sexually frustrated, all French smell, all Italians are lazy, the Poles steal, and Americans are all overweight, undereducated and can't find their own country on a world map. Did I miss something important?

Yes, I'm an engineering student. Glad to know I'm sort of on the right track, in terms of the wardrobe I'll be bringing. I guess I'll be bringing along a tux
post #73 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lusitano View Post
I second the Stuttgart and Munich Opera recommendation.

Stuttgart is not comparable to Munich, but you can have a good time there.

As mentioned above students tend to be a bit more formal
( at least when i attended university in germany).

I really enjoyed my time there, nice people and country!

I'm sure I'll be enjoying my time there as well.
post #74 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan_ View Post
But to tell the dangerous places and situations from the harmless ones I'd have to differentiate more. So one could take that as a rule of thumb. I know I'm a bit too alarming, but better safe than sorry in this case.




I LOL'd so hard, I fell of my chair.
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