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personal trainers unreliable - Page 3

post #31 of 42
I love my trainer, he's a great coach - encouraging, enthusiastic, and keeps our workouts varied so I never get bored. However, he's hitting me up to train 3x a week instead of our usual 2. We're plateauing, so I see the need to amp it up, but I'm not sure if he just needs the $. I'm thinking maybe I'll do 3x a week for a month or two, and see if it really pays off.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarude View Post
most trainers I've worked with (not as a client, experiences from working at a gym for 7+ years) are either a)students putting time in or b)career losers decked out in lululemon who cut routines out of fitness magazines and know shit about fuck. a) are likely to be stoned and b) are likely to be plain stupid. you might luck out and get someone who knows what they're doing and is passionate about it, but most of the time you're either getting a kid or a burnout. keep in mind there is no single certificate trainers need to get in order to be qualified; many certs aren't worth the paper they're printed on. NSCA is a good cert if you're interested in lifting; pretty much every other place will certify trainers with inhouse programs that are complete shit. I was fully certified as a ymca personal trainer in group fitness and individual conditioning at the age of 18 despite knowing absolutely nothing about anything.
Agreed. Most PT certifications aren't protected by a governing institution. Levels of knowledge and professionalism vary widely. The NSCA confers a number of certifications - if you're looking into strength training, try to find someone with a C.S.C.S. (Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist). I can't speak to other certifications, but they do exist. That said, you could just as easily find an unprofessional individual with a legitimate certification. As others have said, quality varies widely in any profession. The internet really can be a useful resource, you just have to be willing to research (and sort out the "bro" science from the legitimate knowledge) Besides, unless its something like boxing, I'd try to cut out a trainer if at all possible. Whether you're using him for motivation or for basic knowledge, in the long run you'll be better off doing the groundwork for yourself (my opinion). I've always viewed those "general" personal trainers to be for the New Year's Resolution type individuals. I do know some people who really thrive with them, but I've worked out solo, in groups, and with other professionals, and I always found that finding the motivation in myself is better than using others to police me.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiefo View Post
Agreed. Most PT certifications aren't protected by a governing institution. Levels of knowledge and professionalism vary widely. The NSCA confers a number of certifications - if you're looking into strength training, try to find someone with a C.S.C.S. (Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist). I can't speak to other certifications, but they do exist.

That said, you could just as easily find an unprofessional individual with a legitimate certification. As others have said, quality varies widely in any profession. The internet really can be a useful resource, you just have to be willing to research (and sort out the "bro" science from the legitimate knowledge)

Besides, unless its something like boxing, I'd try to cut out a trainer if at all possible. Whether you're using him for motivation or for basic knowledge, in the long run you'll be better off doing the groundwork for yourself (my opinion). I've always viewed those "general" personal trainers to be for the New Year's Resolution type individuals.

I do know some people who really thrive with them, but I've worked out solo, in groups, and with other professionals, and I always found that finding the motivation in myself is better than using others to police me.

+100. That's the exact conclusion I came to after spending a year and $2k on a few "trainers".
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiefo View Post
Agreed. Most PT certifications aren't protected by a governing institution. Levels of knowledge and professionalism vary widely. The NSCA confers a number of certifications - if you're looking into strength training, try to find someone with a C.S.C.S. (Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist). I can't speak to other certifications, but they do exist.

That said, you could just as easily find an unprofessional individual with a legitimate certification. As others have said, quality varies widely in any profession. The internet really can be a useful resource, you just have to be willing to research (and sort out the "bro" science from the legitimate knowledge)

Besides, unless its something like boxing, I'd try to cut out a trainer if at all possible. Whether you're using him for motivation or for basic knowledge, in the long run you'll be better off doing the groundwork for yourself (my opinion). I've always viewed those "general" personal trainers to be for the New Year's Resolution type individuals.

I do know some people who really thrive with them, but I've worked out solo, in groups, and with other professionals, and I always found that finding the motivation in myself is better than using others to police me.

This.

If you're too stupid and lazy to figure it out on your own, you're too stupid and lazy to make substantial progress anyway.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post
This.

If you're too stupid and lazy to figure it out on your own, you're too stupid and lazy to make substantial progress anyway.

Not surprisingly, the majority of the population is, just like the majority of the population is too stupid or lazy to figure out their own finances.
post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
honestly, I was very much against personal trainers up until recently. I think that a private boxing coach is the only way to really learn how to box well, I improved dramatically once I started to work with a private coach. I knew how to basically swim, but didn't know how to swim well, working with a swimming coach has helped me improve my skills. I am still not sure that I would work with a trainer in the gym, but I can understand why a person would.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
honestly, I was very much against personal trainers up until recently. I think that a private boxing coach is the only way to really learn how to box well, I improved dramatically once I started to work with a private coach. I knew how to basically swim, but didn't know how to swim well, working with a swimming coach has helped me improve my skills. I am still not sure that I would work with a trainer in the gym, but I can understand why a person would.

Yup- it's just like any other field... there are good and bad examples. Somebody above said "too stupid and lazy" to figure it it out yourself... true for some but there are many, many well-meaning souls who simply don't have the knowledge or vocabulary to know where even to start. I started years ago with a great trainer for one main reason: get me to stick with it. The guy went on to be a trainer in NCAA hockey. He's was knowledgeable, smart and motivating and he accomplished my goal- sticking with it.

I've seen plenty of bad trainers, young kids getting PT degrees etc... but there are good ones if you know how to find them (and aren't too stupid and lazy to do so).
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
honestly, I was very much against personal trainers up until recently. I think that a private boxing coach is the only way to really learn how to box well, I improved dramatically once I started to work with a private coach. I knew how to basically swim, but didn't know how to swim well, working with a swimming coach has helped me improve my skills. I am still not sure that I would work with a trainer in the gym, but I can understand why a person would.
This is true. If someone boxes for awhile, they will build up all kinds of habits. You don't want to be the guy loaded with exploitable habits or technical flaws come the fight nights. A good trainer can teach you how to box properly.
post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 
fuck - my trainer didn't show up today, when I was supposed to have a class, and I was bringing my son and a friend for a class. my trainer has started working with my son, too. I really need a new trainer.
post #40 of 42
It's the kind of "career" where people come and go. My wife's split in the middle of the night--no notice or anything. And a couple have left from my gym. But if they don't show at my gym they are history. And for everyone one trainer who knows his/her stuff and is 100% reliable there are a dozen phoneys. Especially at the big chain clubs. Most of those trainers also look like shit. That's okay for a tailor or a barber but a trainer should lead by example.
post #41 of 42
At my gym in NY, they're reliable. But they cost close to $200 an hour or something ridiculous. I am sure they add value but everyone I always see with them looks out of shape and they chit chat a lot - Maybe I haven't been paying enough attention to their clients long enough to see if they really made an impact.
post #42 of 42
Are we making a distinction between a 'trainer' and a coach? It sounds like you have coach, Globe. Someone who is teaching you a set of skills and helping you progress toward well-defined goals.

When I hear someone described as trainer, I just assume the worst. In all my years of going to commercial gyms, Ive never seen one that's worth a damn. Not a single time. These people put their clients through workouts ranging from silly to downright dangerous (think 60-year-old women balancing on some kind of ball, head within striking range of a sharp metal rack.) The common thread is that clients never make progress, nor do the trainers even attempt to quantify what progress is.

Quote:
A hard workout != having an effective trainer.

This is the quote of the thread. Any fool can make you gas. Designing a program that allows a trainee to progress past the beginner-phase, though, requires a little knowledge of structuring some progressive overload and adaptation.

What Im left wondering is what these certifications can possibly be teaching in their seminars? It's hard to believe this ineffective shit has managed to persist and thrive...
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