or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Riesling Suggestions
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Riesling Suggestions

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Alright, so I've tried Cab Sav, Riesling, Chardonnay, some others that aren't coming to mind.

That being said, I prefer Rieslings. I'm looking for suggestions that aren't 150 bucks a bottle.. preferably well-balanced, mid-dry to sweet.

Quick addition - how am I supposed to be able to tell, in the store, what wine is good and what isn't? The last few recommendations by employees have been terrible.
post #2 of 25
Try a Hogue Cellars. Less than $15 here. I'm no wine expert but sure like that one - maybe a slight bit sweet - but not the sweetest riesling by far.

In a similar vein, you may want to try a few Gewürztraminer. Very similar but without quite as much sweetness. Still not sharp or sour though.

I'm sure not any kind of expert. I do hope someone who is will contribute a response.
post #3 of 25
IMHO, Zind Humbrecht is the finest maker of Rieslings. I actually cannot think of a better overall wine producer. Domaine Weinbach is also excellent. Prices for both go from about 35-200. For ZH, the Clos Windsbuhl is generally thought to be their finest (around 50-60 in a great year), while I like the Turkheim for more regular drinking. The Cuvee Frederic Emilie from Timbach is also a good wine to drink daily. It is relatively cheap, but goes great with food. All good Reisling is great food wine.
post #4 of 25
Honestly, I think it's fun to try a little trial and error by going to the wine store and picking out a case of wine, each bottle different (of the same varietal though). Price btw 10-25 dollars or so each.

To answer your question, if you're looking for reliable and good, try Donnhoff. There are some good ones from NY and Australia as well.
post #5 of 25
Easy solution: Mosels from JJ Prum. His Spatleses and Kabinetts can be exhilarating, and run from $20-30. Ausleses also good, but more expensive and you might or might not find them to be good with food.

In general, try less expensive Mosels from 2001 (sold out but worth a look) and 2004 (by reputation, much the same sort of year).

One additional benefit-- they are great for sipping in the summer, and don't have as much alcohol as most wines.
post #6 of 25
There is a well-written overview of Reisling in Wine News Magazine. Dr. Loosen wines from the Mosel region represent good value.
post #7 of 25
Ch. St. Michelle's 'Eroica' is quite good, shockingly so for a domestic.

Regards,
Huntsman
post #8 of 25
I don't have a particular suggestion for a Riesling, but spicy foods go especially well with Rieslings and other light, slightly sweeter and fruitier wines. One of the best food-wine pairings I've had was Tom Kha Khai (Thai sour coconut milk soup) with a Riesling.

I also really like Rieslings that are slightly effervescent (carbonated).

--Andre
post #9 of 25
I think Dr. Loosen wines are nice too. The good thing about Reisling is that you can get very good quality wines at very reasonable prices compared to some of the other grape varieties.

I eat a lot of Japanese and Chinese food, which I think pair nicely with Reisling wines.
post #10 of 25
I second the St. Michelle. I'm rather surprised at the amount of people here who like rieslings. While finding a decent selection at a restaurant can be somewhat of a challenge, I do enjoy that it is not played out like a chard or, god help you, a white zin. I'd add to the list Firestone's riesling. I passed by there last month and their 2004 was the best white I tasted all day. If I'm not mistaken, the bottle was around $10.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini
I second the St. Michelle. I'm rather surprised at the amount of people here who like rieslings. While finding a decent selection at a restaurant can be somewhat of a challenge, I do enjoy that it is not played out like a chard or, god help you, a white zin. I'd add to the list Firestone's riesling. I passed by there last month and their 2004 was the best white I tasted all day. If I'm not mistaken, the bottle was around $10.
Alsace not Germany IMO.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia
Easy solution: Mosels from JJ Prum.

Word.

Also Dr. Frank from Long Island.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Alsace not Germany IMO.

The Alsatian rieslings tend to dryness, though. The OP is after a sweeter style.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aus_MD
The Alsatian rieslings tend to dryness, though. The OP is after a sweeter style.
I would have known that had I read the original post.
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kronik
Quick addition - how am I supposed to be able to tell, in the store, what wine is good and what isn't? The last few recommendations by employees have been terrible.
Uh, you don't. And unless the employee is really sharp and asks you detailed questions about your taste, they probably won't be of help. German wines: 1) The important thing is to pick a good shipper -- the names mentioned here are all winners. 2) you need to decide on the style -- German wines from the different regions have different styles. Those from, say, the Mosel are lighter, those from the Rheinpflaltz or Rheinhesssen will be more full-bodied. 3) Wines labeled with the following words have some guarantee of being decent (though not necessarily to your taste). In ascending order from driest to sweetest: Kabinett, Spatlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese. The Kabs are pretty dry, and the Spats and some Ausleses are as sweet as you'll want for most food. The Beers and the Tbas are in the dessert category. French Reislings (Alsace and the Loire): Again, good bottler is key. There is no sweetness 'meter' if you will, and the French ones will typically be dry. Good, available names are Trimbach and Hugel. There are others which escape me. American: Just buy an Eroica. Otherwise, get a reccomendation. Regards, Huntsman
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Riesling Suggestions