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Talk to me about moth protection - Page 4

post #46 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post
a weaver can tighten it up..yes.
i bought some garment bags below for my suits and drop some moth balls/cedar inside just in case:

http://www.containerstore.com/shop?p...t=garment+bags

Are those better than the own black plastic bag of each suit brand?
post #47 of 105
As promised in my previous comment, today's post at www.truequalitycleaning.com is all about using cedar -- cedar chests, cedar closets, cedar hangers, cedar blocks and cedar rings -- to "protect" your garments from moth damage. You can read that post here... Blog post: Protecting your fine clothes with cedar: the double edged sword http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...ged-sword.aspx
post #48 of 105
Where can I buy cedar? Does Home Depot carry this? How much would I need for every square feet of closet space?
post #49 of 105
Could you use pheromone moth traps to identify if you have a moth problem or not? The fly-paper-style traps do not kill the larvae which cause the damage, but would catch adult moths if they are in your closet/room. Has anyone used these?
post #50 of 105
iroh: I hope my blog post wasn't the impetus for your decision to buy cedar. Quite the opposite. I'm a non-believer in the mythical powers of cedar. I think that the ability of cedar to protect your garments from moth damage is way overblown, that most individuals forget about the requirement to sand their cedar chests or closets every few years, and that they use cedar blocks, rings and hangers long after the effectiveness of the cedar oil has dissipated. So you get all the negatives associated with cedar and very little of the positives. So much so, that I, myself, have no cedar in my closet other than in my shoe trees. I go back to my original comment: dry clean when you need to and dry clean at the end of the season before you store. That way you won't have to worry about solutions that have limited effectiveness.
post #51 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by stubloom View Post
iroh: I hope my blog post wasn't the impetus for your decision to buy cedar.

Quite the opposite. I'm a non-believer in the mythical powers of cedar. I think that the ability of cedar to protect your garments from moth damage is way overblown, that most individuals forget about the requirement to sand their cedar chests or closets every few years, and that they use cedar blocks, rings and hangers long after the effectiveness of the cedar oil has dissipated. So much so, that I, myself, have no cedar in my closet other than in my shoe trees.

I go back to my original comment: dry clean when you need to and dry clean at the end of the season before you store. That way you wont have to worry about solutions that are ineffective.

I guess it boils down to choosing between dry clean and moth holes. Dry clean also has negative impact on suits and jackets,I try to avoid dry cleaning but I would rather have them dry cleaned than have holes in them.
post #52 of 105
forex makes an excellent point on dry cleaning vs moth holes. I would add that you can further limit or control the impact of poor dry cleaning on your fine garments by choosing your dry cleaner very carefully. And that dry cleaner probably isn't located on your way to work or next door to the supermarket you visit once a week. Your dry cleaner need not be a necessary evil. Quite the contrary. A true quality cleaner can be a great ally in maintaining your wardrobe in pristine condition over the long term!
post #53 of 105
What about cedar oil? I got one of those things from Walmart where you open it like an air freshener. Would these be more effective than mothballs, not to mention smell better and less toxic? I had one in my closet but I found out I'm probably allergic to cedar as it gave me nasal congestion, but my closet was right next to my desk where I sit all day. Now in my new apartment the closet is located in a more remote location.
post #54 of 105
Kent Wang: If you clean your garments regularly or at least at the end of the season, you can toss the cedar oil. It serves no purpose.
post #55 of 105
+1 about the myth of cedar, it is ineffective against moths. If a bug is eating your clothes try to find one, kill it or catch it and show it to an exterminator to determine what will rid your closet/house of the problem. There are more than just moths that will eat fabric.
post #56 of 105
What about steaming the garments before storing for the season?
post #57 of 105
badsha asks about steaming before storing for the season. Steaming alone will not remove any of the nutrients -- body oils, perspiration, etc. -- that the female adult moth looks for when she's looking for the "ideal" place to lay her eggs. Steaming, as a means of protecting your fine wools against moth damage, is worthless.
post #58 of 105
Although it sounds like the OP is past the "clean everything point", as someone who went through a serious clothing moth issue this year, I can add an alternative to dry cleaning/washing everything (=expensive!!!!). You can put everything in black plastic bags and sit them out in the sun for ~3 hours. If it get's to 90 degrees+ it will kill all larvae and adults. If leaving all your stuff out in black plastic bags isn't possible, a shortcut that I used was to load it all up in my car and leave it out in the sun for the afternoon. Here in Florida, most months you can get your internal car temperature up to well over 100 degrees. Also remember that it's not just your clothes - your bedding, towels, everything should be considered suspect. And make sure to get all that stuff that's been sitting in the attic/back-closet forever! This has helped us a lot because it's been (relatively) easy enough to do that we did it multiple times (since the lifecycle can mean that you don't get all of them on the first shot). Oh, one other thing that I didn't see mentioned: animal hair. Clothing moths feed on body oils/hair/nails, your pets as well as yours. If your pets shed, those little bits of hair are tasty treats. A little pile of pet dander under a piece of furniture is a perfect place for them to breed. Hope this helps!
post #59 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by stubloom View Post
badsha asks about steaming before storing for the season.

Steaming alone will not remove any of the nutrients -- body oils, perspiration, etc. -- that the female adult moth looks for when she's looking for the "ideal" place to lay her eggs. Steaming, as a means of protecting your fine wools against moth damage, is worthless.

How about keeping them in breathable bags? I keep the stuff that I don't wear in those bags,got a bunch of them from target,they are canvass bags with zippers. However, I was told that the fabric needs to breath and keeping it in the bags could be bad,I thought the whole point of canvass was to make sure that fabric can breath.
post #60 of 105
[quote=razl;3955042]
If leaving all your stuff out in black plastic bags isn't possible, a shortcut that I used was to load it all up in my car and leave it out in the sun for the afternoon. Here in Florida, most months you can get your internal car temperature up to well over 100 degrees.[quote]

At the other end of the spectrum, i've often read that putting affected clothes in bags and freezing them will kill any moths/larvae on them. Does anyone have any views on the effectiveness of this approach?

Whilst I can certainly appreciate the logic in dry cleaning everything at the end of the season, this is not really going to be practical for most people (dry cleaning a full closet of suits, overcoats etc at a decent dry cleaners in London will easily cost you thousands of pounds).
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