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The King's Speech Film - a Critique - Page 3

post #31 of 41
i have yet to see it, partly from the fear that like most historical movies it will take too many liberties to make the story more compelling. Does it show the infamous balcony appearance of Chamberlain after Munich or Churchill's reaction to it? George VI has to take responsibility for that. The movie also omits mention of Louis Greig, the King's long-time mentor and confidant:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/f...ey-mentor.html

Louis was aristocratic, and it makes a better movie to play-up the role of a commoner (and what could be "broader" than an Australian - but a nice counterpoint given the speech therapist role). A little bit like the Madness of King George. Still it can't be as bad as the "re-presentation" of history in The Patriot...
post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorialism View Post
The final scene is very moving, and the sensation you get when watching it on the large screen, with the music (Mozart) timed perfectly to the speech, is powerful indeed.


i liked it too, but i couldn't help wondering during that final scene what happened to the therapist's sons during wwii? they were certainly of draft age and casualties were very high.
post #33 of 41
Saw it this afternoon, loved it. Can't help but think the scenes after the speech were unnecessary though; movie could have ended as soon as he finished without any ill-effect.
post #34 of 41
I put a fairly large chunk of money on this to win best picture back when it was a big darkhorse. It's now a heavy favorite and I will praise it endlessly if it wins. :knockonwood:
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
I put a fairly large chunk of money on this to win best picture back when it was a big darkhorse. It's now a heavy favorite and I will praise it endlessly if it wins. :knockonwood:

What does that mean?
post #36 of 41
being very darkhorsey
post #37 of 41
Dark horse Found the movie to be utterly conventional, only really saved by great performances. Oh look, another movie with cheering at the end! Somebody shoot me.
post #38 of 41
I thought the movie was great.

I loved the robe he wore when he was smoking on the couch before he played the record.
post #39 of 41
I didn't like it all. I've seen almost all of the films that were nominated for the major awards (except True Grit and Toy Story). My favorites were: Winter's Bone and Biutiful (i know it wasn't nominated, but Bardim was). 127 Hours came in third for me.
post #40 of 41
saw it in the weekend and enjoyed it. quite low key overall, so a refreshing change.

the opening scene is chilling if you've ever had a public speaking "moment" - get's you hooked for the whole movie. a shame they glossed over the Chamberlain episode, in some ways that would have added to the arc of the story. i liked the juxtaposition of Logue's failed acting daliances reciting king's speaches from Shakespeare with his true-life job of helping a real King with speeches of the greatest importance. you get the impression that Logue's character never saw the irony...

some bits were overworked (like the Archbishop coronation confrontation - the Duke of Norfolk calls the shots there anyway), and the portrail of Edward VIII was even less flattering than usual, but overall very good. they imply that the King's association with Logue began during the build-up to war, but apparently it started in the mid-20s.
post #41 of 41
shabamp. just watched it with the wife for the first time. was excellent. we both enjoyed the movie from start to finish.
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