or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 206

post #3076 of 3283
29 The Girl In The Spiders Web by David Lagercrantz The front cover states continuing Stieg Larsson Millennium Series.

Time waits for no one and time moves along with grave robbers and the profit motive. I just started this last night fifty pages and in a long way to go its 430 pages long. Mrs GF picked this up at a Op Shop during a recent Sydney visit.

First I notice that the narrative voice is nothing like the trilogy and its focused on contemporary ideas of Big Brother NSA surveillance, hackers and dysfunctional computer nerds,the impact of the Internet and the decline of quality journalism in its long form and the dumbing down of public discourse, commerce as trophy acquisition and that's just in fifty pages. And through in the obligatory alcoholic journalist pub scene and a few pints of Guinness for good measure, don't the Swedes make stout?

And away we go.

Lisbeth has briefly emerged as a player but not in her own voice yet in the narrative so that is going to be interesting. With another East Cost low and rain predicted all weekend I'll think i'll make headway with this. I have doubts about it but who knows maybe i might be pleasantly surprised. (maybe)
post #3077 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

29 The Girl In The Spiders Web by David Lagercrantz The front cover states continuing Stieg Larsson Millennium Series.

One of those books that I refuse to touch, on principle.

Too many people have never "got" Larsson's books, largely because the title of the first book - "Men Who Hate Women" - was changed with the English translation. The series is about the abuse of women, and when Lisbeth gets her day in court in book 3, that's when Larsson has made his political point. There is nothing to "continue", but there is an interesting character to rip off and make more money out of.

Larsson was a political journalist, not a thriller writer, and I doubt that he would have been doing this.
post #3078 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

One of those books that I refuse to touch, on principle.

Too many people have never "got" Larsson's books, largely because the title of the first book - "Men Who Hate Women" - was changed with the English translation. The series is about the abuse of women, and when Lisbeth gets her day in court in book 3, that's when Larsson has made his political point. There is nothing to "continue", but there is an interesting character to rip off and make more money out of.

Larsson was a political journalist, not a thriller writer, and I doubt that he would have been doing this.

As I said "Grave robbing" I think he made a number of political points throughout the series which condemned particular aspects of Swedish culture which that powers that be would rather not acknowledge.

As a story it could have been cast with other characters and it would have been a good read, as it is it's simply grave robbing.
post #3079 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

As I said "Grave robbing" I think he made a number of political points throughout the series which condemned particular aspects of Swedish culture which that powers that be would rather not acknowledge.

As a story it could have been cast with other characters and it would have been a good read, as it is it's simply grave robbing.

A very good way of putting it.
post #3080 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

A very good way of putting it.

Worse it provides the most absurd explanation for Salanders hacker handle 'Wasp' linking it to the Marvel comics character. Brings in a evil twin sister WTF And sets it up for another book. What a crock of S..t!
post #3081 of 3283
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
0. Asterix and the Missing Scroll
1. The Whisperer
2. The Vanished Ones
3. Quarterly Essay: Political Amnesia
4. From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant
5. The Lost Girls of Rome
6. Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?
7. Never Mind
8. The Vegetarian
9. Man on Fire
10. Comfort Zone
11. The Invisible man From Salem
12. Red Light
13. Balancing Act
14. Crimea: The Last Crusade
15. Misterioso
16. The Lost Sailors
17. Black Run
18. The Natural Way of Things
19. Piano Lessons
20. Pedigree
21. Sing Fox To Me
22. Mister Roberts
23. Talking To My Country
24. The Bricks That Built the Houses

25. Oblivion
OblivionOblivion by Arnaldur Indriðason

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


In Oblivion, Indridason continues his exploration of Erlendur's early career. Now he is a detective, working under his mentor, Marion.

Marion and Erlendur are called to investigate a body found in a lava pit. The dead man seems to have fallen from a great height. He also appears to have links with the nearby US military base.

While Marion leads that investigation, Erlendur investigates the long-ago disappearance of a schoolgirl. This continues his fascination with missing persons, which readers of the series will be familiar with. As he talks to people involved, he also turns up links to the military base.

While this is a good entry in the series, it's far from my favourite (which would be Strange Shores). I guess I prefer the crusty, world-weary Erlendur of the earlier novels; I'm just not that interested in his formative years.


View all my reviews
post #3082 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Worse it provides the most absurd explanation for Salanders hacker handle 'Wasp' linking it to the Marvel comics character. Brings in a evil twin sister WTF And sets it up for another book. What a crock of S..t!

Yuk. You've confirmed my worst fears.
post #3083 of 3283
List (Click to show)
1. Hicksville
2. Slaughterhouse 5
3. Firefight
4. Snow Leopard
5. The Rehearsal
6. Lagoon
7. Solo Faces
8. Breath
9. The Internet is Not the Answer
10. A Sport and a Past Time
11. White Teeth
12. The Bell Jar
13. The Invisible Man
14. The Subtle Knife
15 Consider Phlebas
16. The Amber Spyglass
17. The Liar's Key
18. 1000 Splendid Suns
19. The Windup Girl
20. Fire Colour One
21. The Player of Games
22. The Buddha of Suburbia
23. Prince of Thorns
24. King of Thorns
25. Emperor of Thorns
26. Oryx and Crake
27. Use of Weapons
28. The long way to a small angry planet
29. Heart goes last
30. Generation A
31. The Medium is the Message
32. Them

32. Them

 

Jon Ronson is a really entertaining writer who manages to write about people and topics that beg for derision with some wit, humanity and empathy. In this book he talks to extremists, conspiracy theorists and fringe theorists about a range of topics. In many cases people blame the Jews (Ronson is one) for the ills of the world and assume there is a small oligarchy controlling and manipulating all aspects of social, political and economic life.

 

The writing is beautifully understated - and Ronson has a way of implying what he thinks clearly, rather than just beating readers about the head with his impressions, beliefs and opinions.

 

Great read!

post #3084 of 3283
30 The Butchers of Berlin by Chris Petit A new entry into the Berlin Noir genre. 1943 the last round up of the Jews is underway and a hungover desk bound detective is thrust into the heart of darkness that is the Nazi capital. Dragooned into the investigation of a murder suicide and encountering the Nazi hierarchies favourite chiromancer, things then get worse with the discovery of a flayed headless body found in abattoir. And in the best detective fashion his hangover is just getting worse.

So far so good, the intro is blunt brutal and the blackout sets the atmospherics of the narrative perfectly for a descent into the collective madness of the Nazi capital.
post #3085 of 3283
54. The Crossing- Michael Connelly-

Bosch is forcibly retired by the LAPD and crosses the aisle to work with his half-brother, the Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller. Together they solve a case which the police felt was open-and-shut.

Fair Stuff

55. The Hunting Trip- W.E.B. Griffin A one-off chronicle of thirty years in the life of a fictionally famous self-made author. Written to be humorous, but only achieved it half the time.

Middling Stuff
post #3086 of 3283
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

[assume there is a small oligarchy controlling and manipulating all aspects of social, political and economic life.

Where would they get that idea?
post #3087 of 3283

;)

post #3088 of 3283
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
0. Asterix and the Missing Scroll
1. The Whisperer
2. The Vanished Ones
3. Quarterly Essay: Political Amnesia
4. From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant
5. The Lost Girls of Rome
6. Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?
7. Never Mind
8. The Vegetarian
9. Man on Fire
10. Comfort Zone
11. The Invisible man From Salem
12. Red Light
13. Balancing Act
14. Crimea: The Last Crusade
15. Misterioso
16. The Lost Sailors
17. Black Run
18. The Natural Way of Things
19. Piano Lessons
20. Pedigree
21. Sing Fox To Me
22. Mister Roberts
23. Talking To My Country
24. The Bricks That Built the Houses
25. Oblivion

26. The Sixth Extinction
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural HistoryThe Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Robert McCrum rated The Sixth Extinction as one of the greatest non-fiction books ever written. While I wouldn't go that far, it is certainly an interesting and disturbing read. Kolbert goes through the great extinction episodes in prehistory and explores the science that attempts to explain them. Each chapter focuses on an extinct or endangered life form and uses its situation to illuminate her central thesis; that there is a sixth extinction event under way, caused by human impact on the planet.

Kolbert makes her argument convincing. The chapter on the Great Barrier Reef is particularly sobering in the wake of recent reports on the recent massive bleaching event - the book gives an excellent account of what is happening there. She also makes the salient point that our high degree of mobility is causing us to reverse the influence of continental drift - life forms that were separated with the continents are now being transplanted by humans, sometimes with dire results.

An excellent read, but unfortunately it does not offer much in the way of solutions, or even hope.


View all my reviews
post #3089 of 3283

Maybe there aren't any solutions so there's not much hope :(

post #3090 of 3283
56. The Walking Drum- Louis L'Amour

Epic of the adventures of Mathurin Kerbouchard, a Briton schooled in the Druid tradition who accomplishes enormous feats before finally finding and freeing his father.

Pretty outlandish in places, but overall a good read, especially for a period piece.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge