or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 192

post #2866 of 3286
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
0. Asterix and the Missing Scroll
1. The Whisperer


2. The Vanished Ones
The Vanished OnesThe Vanished Ones by Donato Carrisi

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Mila Vasquez, the protagonist of The Whisperer, is now working in a department nicknamed Limbo, which handles the most hopeless missing persons cases. As Mila focuses on investigating these cold cases, long-vanished missing persons start to return, only to kill people.

Mila teams up with departmental pariah Simon Berish to try to get to the bottom of this. Why have these people suddenly started re-appearing, and what is the reason for their murderous behaviour? It gradually dawns on Mira that there are greater forces and a larger conspiracy at work.

Carrisi once again spins an intricate plot with regular satisfying twists; I certainly didn't pick the ending. The empathy-challenged Mira remains a strong central character, although I was not that enamored of Simon, who came across as a bit of a lightweight most of the time. I also thought the character of the Judge was a great addition, and I hope Carrisi keeps the Judge in future stories.

I didn't think this entry was as strong as the first book, but there is enough in here to make me want to stick with the Vasquez series as Carrisi adds to it.


View all my reviews
post #2867 of 3286
3. Into The Labyrinth by Sigge Eklund Scandi Nori told in the manner of Rashomon by four individuals who are also two couples. The parents of the child who has gone missing and the protege of the lead male protagonist and his girlfriend.

The female lead is psychologist WIMHO is batshit crazy even prior to the abduction. At times I found this interesting others the characters all struck me as vapid, self centered and neurotic.

Would I recommend this? Well I plan to leave it at the little library in North Bondi just to be rid of it
post #2868 of 3286
13. The Rider of Lost Creek Louis L' Amour

The last of the Lance Kilkenny books. He settles a range war through diplomacy and kills his most dangerous enemy yet. He wins the love of a woman, but spurns her for the wandering life of the dusty trail.

Quite entertaining.
post #2869 of 3286
14. The Outlaws of Mesquite Louis L'Amour

A collection of Western short stories. One of the better groups I've read.
post #2870 of 3286
15. Jimi Hendrix (The Lost Writings)- Cherokee Mist- Bill Nitopi (editor)

Another Christmas present from my daughters. Bits and pieces of poetry, a play, and published and unpublished songs.

Cool if you're a Hendrix fan.

I especially liked the pictures. smile.gif
post #2871 of 3286
List (Click to show)
1. Hicksville
2. Slaughterhouse 5
3. Firefight

 

3. Firefight

 

Fairly over-the-top sci-fi - basically x-men with a few notable differences (every super power comes with a weakness that negates it completely, those receiving super powers become evil). Fun, not much more than that.

 

The author, Brandon Sanderson, has written some excellent books, but this is not really original nor is it uniquely written.

post #2872 of 3286
I hate Brandon Sanderson and his superhero bullshit is scraping a new low. Would rather read twilight. And that's coming from someone who breathes YA garbage.
post #2873 of 3286
I really enjoyed Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy due to the unique magic system if nothing else. And at least we know he's not going to dick tease us like that hobbit G.R.R. Martin and take years to put a book out.
post #2874 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

14. The Outlaws of Mesquite Louis L'Amour

A collection of Western short stories. One of the better groups I've read.

I haven't read L'Amour but want to get into him. Is there a certain book or series that's a recommended start?
post #2875 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirGrotius View Post

I haven't read L'Amour but want to get into him. Is there a certain book or series that's a recommended start?

Hondo (single novel)
The Sacketts (series)
post #2876 of 3286
Damn. Steve B... Already a third there and it's only January

Better step my game up
post #2877 of 3286
16. Monument Rock Louis L'Amour

Another Western short story collection. The title is a novella, with Kilkenny and crew the lead characters. Kilkenny finally marries his girlfriend and they toddle together off into the sunset.

Enjoyable read
post #2878 of 3286
Thanks Steve B!

I've had a good start to the year with an eclectic set. I lean toward accessible nonfiction.

  1. The Swerve -- Stephan Greenblatt. This was a gift from my egghead brother, but woke up that college-esque spirit of wonder and merriment in reading an intellectual history. Very well written and accessible despite the Harvard position. It was a little more straight history, in terms of following the search for Lucretius's On the Nature of Things rather than an analysis of its impact. I'd HIGHLY recommend it.
  2. Dead Wake -- Erik Larson. Having read the Devil in the White City a while back, I figured I'd give Larson another try. Dead Wake takes a few perspectives, the mostly upper-class ship-goers (fairly droll), the machinations in Washington DC to keep the US out of the war (intriguing if not unexpected), and the planning and coordination of the early U-Boat captains (fascinating). I'd recommend it.
  3. An Innocent Client -- Scott Pratt. Pure trash read. This was more intense and fast paced than your standard Grisham novel with a little less setting and more straight-up classic characters. Embarrassingly, I enjoyed it thoroughly. Highly recommend it to kill some brain cells.
  4. Isaac's Storm -- Erik Larson. This was apropos considering the snow storm that hit the East Coast this weekend. Isaac's storm chronicles the spirit and creation of the national weather service in the late 19th century to turn of the century, and features a debacle of a hurricane that leveled Galvestown, Texas. The book picks up momentum akin to a storm. I'd recommend it.
post #2879 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

I hate Brandon Sanderson and his superhero bullshit is scraping a new low. Would rather read twilight. And that's coming from someone who breathes YA garbage.

 

Yeah, I'm kind of feeling this way. I enjoyed Mistborn, but he writes the sort of fantasy that's a bit too hypermasculine escapist excess for me to really love it. It's like reading Some Eddings or Rothfuss, the main dude is just too obnoxiously always winning. I mean I can stomach the blatant unoriginality, but the characterisation is cliche and paltry.

 

Breaks up the reading schedule, though.

 

List (Click to show)
1. Hicksville
2. Slaughterhouse 5
3. Firefight
4. Snow Leopard

 

4. Snow Leopard

 

Some dude who is into LSD and likes talking about Buddhism walks through the Himalayas and doesn't see a Snow Leopard but that's OK because Buddhism is about ~the moment~. 50-70s travel writing is boring as fuck, and I haven't read anything to prove that wrong.

 

Just like a 'Short Walk through the Hindu Kush' except without any descriptions of beautiful women, diarrhea or mullberries.

post #2880 of 3286
17. Killoe Louis L'Amour

A settler's community is being crowded and rustled in Texas. They drive a large herd of cattle through many hardships and obstacles to Eastern New Mexico to make a new home.

And Dan Killoe gets his girl.

Fair to middling as far as L'Amour goes.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge