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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 173

post #2581 of 3288
I dunno, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on Remainder. I guess you could solidly argue its postmodernism, what with all its unfixities and recursions and whatnot -- and you might be right -- but all that would be true of the various modernisms as well, and of any bold work from a fixed time period. To me Remainder felt older, or at least something all its own. Really loved that one.

(I read C!)
post #2582 of 3288
Haven't read Remainder will add it to my list.

The thing with PoMo is that it was very specific to its time and did have a definite style and yes Modernism has had specific movements both literary and visual which adjusted ideas to suit their time frame. But I think that PoMo was broader in its scope and terms of reference in particular the use of briocolage,cultural studies the broad impact of French Structuralist and Post Structuralist thought and it gave rise to a lot of divergent movements in both society and the arts, which still persist. When I did my MVCR we had a lot of discussions about PoMo and its specific dimensions and impact. A friend of mine doesn't even think it existed to him the whole PoMo thing was happened was just a correction in Modernism which produced a self referential High Modernism. Mind you there are plenty of people who still think in terms of High and Low Art, me its all just cultural production dictated by the individual either observing or reacting to the milieu and producing product intune with the zeitgeist.
post #2583 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post



Book Depository has it for $43 shipped. They are ultra-reliable in my experience

 

I've never read a book I'd pay $43 for.

 

It's just too much for me to pay.

 

I know I'd enjoy it, and I'm sure the costs of printing are markedly higher because of photos, but yeah. Not happening.

post #2584 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

I've never read a book I'd pay $43 for.

It's just too much for me to pay.

Well, when you consider the average paperback price is about $32, $43 is not so much nowadays. I don’t spend that kind of money either, unless it is on very high-quality stuff that e-books can’t do justice to, and I can’t get through the library. This might be one such book.
post #2585 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Well, when you consider the average paperback price is about $32, $43 is not so much nowadays. I don’t spend that kind of money either, unless it is on very high-quality stuff that e-books can’t do justice to, and I can’t get through the library. This might be one such book.

It is IMHO one of the best visual war memoirs written, Dispatches by Michael Herr is another which is staggering in its blunt descriptive power of the Vietnam war. I had a copy which went walk about in the 80's then found a copy in 2008 at a secondhand book store in Beechworth. Well worth a visit if your out that way, I've picked some great books up from there over the years.
post #2586 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Haven't read Remainder will add it to my list.

The thing with PoMo is that it was very specific to its time and did have a definite style

Dammit, Firmin! I picked the wrong day for this. I've had no sleep.

Although I am very, very interested in/suspicious of our need to categorize, I think I both agree and disagree with you. All I meant up there, though, was that you could take any concrete technique associated with postmodernism and find numerous examples in other works going back to the first novel -- and maybe the most postmodern of all -- Don Quixote. So that makes everything seem to hinge on authorial intent (Example: we might believe the end notes of Infinite Jest to represent the fracturing of whatever, but do we believe that all other, more mundane contemporary works with end notes function the same way?) which most liberal art professor -types insist on doing away with (not least of all because it enhances the need for the critic).

Steven Moore has an outstanding book on what he calls an alternative history of the novel, offered as mild corrective to those who teach the -isms as arriving in stages. (Not that I attribute that idea to you, it's just a great book on the subject). The intro is awesome, and you can still read it on the link, I think.
post #2587 of 3288
Realized I've not kept up with adding these as I read them, apologies for the lack of review.

12/50 Black Light – Stephen Hunter
13/50 Time to Hunt – Stephen Hunter
14/50 The 47th Samurai – Stephen Hunter
15/50 Night of Thunder – Stephen Hunter
16/50 On Chesil Beach – Ian McEwan
17/50 Amsterdam – Ian McEwan
18/50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
19/50 The Mind’s Eye – Hakan Nesser
post #2588 of 3288
30 The Last Good Man by A.J.Kazinski who is actually the Nom de Gurre of two Danish film makers. A third of the way in standard Scandi Noir, entertaining, an interesting read the story is a take on the idea of the 36 righteous men.

This is interesting two thirds of the way through and it moves out of being a standard Scandi Noir and into a metaphysical god is not happy with humanity story that fixed on the 36 righteous men and the idea of sin and renewal. Something different, not what I expected considering the pivot points in the story.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 5/12/15 at 3:17pm
post #2589 of 3288
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1. A Tale for the Time Being
2. The Sun is God
3. The Keeper of Lost Causes
4. Lost and Found
5. Murder on the Eiffel Tower
6. How to be Both
7. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore
8. Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth
9. Levels of Life
10. The Seventh Day
11. Fortunately the Milk
11b. The Sleeper and the Spindle
12. The Agile Project Management Handbook
13. Reykjavik Nights
14. The Siege
15. The Torch
16. Being Mortal
17. Hicksville
18. Sam Zabel and the Magic Pen
19. The Buried Giant
20. Another Time, Another Life
21. The Corpse Reader
22. Portrait of a Man
23. All the Birds, Singing


24. Out Stealing Horses
Out Stealing HorsesOut Stealing Horses by Per Petterson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


At the outset of Out Stealing Horses Per Petterson seems to be telling a fairly simple story of a man recalling a childhood friendship that went wrong. Trond Sander is 67 years old and has retired to a remote area of Norway, becoming something of a recluse. He meets a near neighbour called Lars, after which he starts ruminating on an episode from his childhood, when he went out “stealing” horses with his friend Jon.

The episode does not end well, and Jon and Trond become estranged soon afterwards. As Trond recalls events, we learn more about the terrible background to this story. About halfway through the novel, the reader might think that Petterson’s narrative trajectory is clear. However in the second half, he shifts our understanding so that we see all of the previous events in a very different light.

Petterson’s story reveals a complex relationship between a father and his son with far-reaching consequences. The remote parts of Norway, near the Swedish border, and the life that Trond and his father lived there, are described beautifully. A really good read.




View all my reviews
post #2590 of 3288
List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists

2. Acceptance

3. Shipbreaker

4. Winter's Bone

5. Dhmara Bums

6. Istanbul

7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan

8. Holy Bible

9. The Boat

10. Collected Stories

11. Lost and Found

12. Blind Willow, Sleeping woman

13. White Noise

14. Clariel

15. Off the Rails

16. Sabriel

17 Hitler's Daughter

18. Quack this Way

19. Grapes of Wrath

20. Every Man in this Village is a Liar

21. The Twelve Fingered Boy

22. Riders of the Purple Sage

23. The Sheltering Sky

24. How to Travel the World for Free

25. Deliverance

26. Trigger Warning

27. It's Complicated

28. Fight Club

29. Past the Shallows
30. Wonderboys
31. It's what I do
32. A Long Way Down

 

32. A Long Way Down

 

This is an odd little book. It's Nick Hornby, so its wry and upfront and humoured, but it's also about suicide, so it's quite dark and gives its subject matter gravity. It follows four characters who try to commit suicide, and in their attempt meet each other. Each highly different and massively dysfunctional, Hornby's story weaves in and out of how they are forced together and, don't triumph, but move through their immediate issue of suicide - though not their bigger issues with life.

post #2591 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post


32. A Long Way Down

I remember reading that one when it first came out, and liking it. It’s about the last Hornby book I read. Nothing of his has interested me since.
post #2592 of 3288

I really, really liked High Fidelity, and this. But nothing else of his has moved me.

post #2593 of 3288
29 The Peripheral by William Gibson started on this last night a departure from his previous the future is now trilogy
post #2594 of 3288
I liked How To Be Good. Very different for Hornby at the time. I also thought Fever Pitch was pretty good as a piece of sports writing, almost.
post #2595 of 3288
This is crazy went to order a copy of the Herbie Hancock biography and thought what are the odds of getting it local and found a hardback copy at Paperchain in Canberra which was cheaper than the book depository. What is the world coming too.
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