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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 172

post #2566 of 3275
29. Valley of the Sun Louis L'Amour 1995

A posthumously published collection of short stories. Light reading, but quite enjoyable.
post #2567 of 3275
33 DOMINION by C.J.Sansom An alternative version of history where England sues for peace in 1940. The action takes place in 1952 the Germans are still fighting the Russians after Stalin was hung by Hitler in Red Square. The Resistance is not futile and populated by a cast of known historical figures. An interesting tale but is it just alternative history or another one of those multiverse stories? Either way far too long the editor could have cut it by a third IMHO.
post #2568 of 3275
List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists

2. Acceptance

3. Shipbreaker

4. Winter's Bone

5. Dhmara Bums

6. Istanbul

7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan

8. Holy Bible

9. The Boat

10. Collected Stories

11. Lost and Found

12. Blind Willow, Sleeping woman

13. White Noise

14. Clariel

15. Off the Rails

16. Sabriel

17 Hitler's Daughter

18. Quack this Way

19. Grapes of Wrath

20. Every Man in this Village is a Liar

21. The Twelve Fingered Boy

22. Riders of the Purple Sage

23. The Sheltering Sky

24. How to Travel the World for Free

25. Deliverance

26. Trigger Warning

27. It's Complicated

28. Fight Club

29. Past the Shallows
30. Wonderboys

 

30. Wonderboys

 

This novel has everything a good Chabon novel should have: enjoyable prose, a wild plot, a lot of Jewishness and a kind of middle age ache that manages to be interesting, rather than dull. The main character (Tripp Grady) finds himself at a friend's party, stoned, talking to some students of his as his editor asks him about a novel he has been working on for the past 7 years. Circumstances and characters collide and Tripp's weekend becomes a series of incredibly ludicrous and dangerous events including Passover, killing an animal, losing his wife and having his car stolen.

 

I enjoyed this novel. It's not the masterpiece that Cavalier and Klay was, nor is it the anarchic romp that Yiddish Policeman's Union was - it's somewhere in the middle, making small suggestions about growing up, reclamation and giving in. It's a solid novel, just not an amazing one.

post #2569 of 3275
32 The Girl Who Wasn't There by Ferdinand von Schirach

At first i thought this was another post modern murder mystery with existentialist overtones, but to my surprise its much more than that. I really enjoyed this dark and mysterious work. Highly recommended.
post #2570 of 3275
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1. A Tale for the Time Being
2. The Sun is God
3. The Keeper of Lost Causes
4. Lost and Found
5. Murder on the Eiffel Tower
6. How to be Both
7. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore
8. Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth
9. Levels of Life
10. The Seventh Day
11. Fortunately the Milk
11b. The Sleeper and the Spindle
12. The Agile Project Management Handbook
13. Reykjavik Nights
14. The Siege
15. The Torch
16. Being Mortal
17. Hicksville
18. Sam Zabel and the Magic Pen
19. The Buried Giant
20. Another Time, Another Life
21. The Corpse Reader
22. Portrait of a Man



23. All the Birds, Singing
All the Birds, SingingAll the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


All the Birds, Singing is set in a remote island off the coast of Britain, and in the scorching heat of the Australian outback. The central character, Jake, is living on the island running a small sheep farm on her own, and her sheep are dying violently from some kind of mysterious attack. A stranger turns up on her farm, giving her grounds for suspicion.

The book also tells the story of Jake’s life as a shearer in remote Western Australian, where she struggles as the only woman in a very male shed. Like all the others there, Jake has secrets that she is keeping from others. As Wyld tells her story, she starts to reveal those secrets, while also recounting Jake’s attempts in Britain to identify the threat to her sheep farm.

Wyld perfectly captures the heat and loneliness of the Outback and the taciturn nature of the people who make their lives there. I think that she is less successful in capturing remote rural England; the people there come across a bit cliched. The Australian arc of the narrative is also much better told than the English arc and the resolutions feel more complete in the former. Still, the book is really well written and is an engaging read.

All the Birds, Singing won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia’s top literary award, and it’s not hard to see why. I can’t help but think, personally, that I’d rather see the award go to somebody who is not described on her book’s blurb as one of the Best New British Novelists. I don’t think that’s what the Miles Franklin is for.



View all my reviews
post #2571 of 3275
List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists

2. Acceptance

3. Shipbreaker

4. Winter's Bone

5. Dhmara Bums

6. Istanbul

7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan

8. Holy Bible

9. The Boat

10. Collected Stories

11. Lost and Found

12. Blind Willow, Sleeping woman

13. White Noise

14. Clariel

15. Off the Rails

16. Sabriel

17 Hitler's Daughter

18. Quack this Way

19. Grapes of Wrath

20. Every Man in this Village is a Liar

21. The Twelve Fingered Boy

22. Riders of the Purple Sage

23. The Sheltering Sky

24. How to Travel the World for Free

25. Deliverance

26. Trigger Warning

27. It's Complicated

28. Fight Club

29. Past the Shallows
30. Wonderboys
31. It's what I do

 

31. It's what I do

 

This is a memoir written by Lynsey Addario - an award winning photojournalist who covered war, famine, STIs, and conflict of various types. The book traces her beginnings as a child and then as a photographer, and the thrill and empathy that were evoked by war. This is a great text and thoroughly enjoyed it. Lynsey is an interesting person - her motivations are common place, but her narrative voice is strong and her recollections are vivid. She really did go almost everywhere - some of the most deadly places in the world (she got captured in Libya in 2011).

 

She reflects a lot on what it means to be an observer, and how one tries to give voice to those who have none, she constantly reflects on her learning and her mistakes and is, I think, a pretty informed person to be writing about the War on Terror and other conflicts. The threads that connect her experiences are romance (and how difficult it is for her), her profession (ups, downs) and motivations.

 

I really enjoyed this, and it makes the second memoir I've loved this year largely reflecting on the War on Terror (Every Man in This Village is a Liar was the other one, with a much stronger focus on foreign policy).

 

Highly recommended.

post #2572 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post


31. It's what I do

Sounds great Matt.
post #2573 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists


2. Acceptance


3. Shipbreaker


4. Winter's Bone


5. Dhmara Bums


6. Istanbul


7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan


8. Holy Bible


9. The Boat


10. Collected Stories


11. Lost and Found


12. Blind Willow, Sleeping woman


13. White Noise


14. Clariel


15. Off the Rails


16. Sabriel


17 Hitler's Daughter


18. Quack this Way


19. Grapes of Wrath


20. Every Man in this Village is a Liar


21. The Twelve Fingered Boy


22. Riders of the Purple Sage


23. The Sheltering Sky


24. How to Travel the World for Free


25. Deliverance


26. Trigger Warning


27. It's Complicated


28. Fight Club


29. Past the Shallows

30. Wonderboys

31. It's what I do

31. It's what I do

This is a memoir written by Lynsey Addario - an award winning photojournalist who covered war, famine, STIs, and conflict of various types. The book traces her beginnings as a child and then as a photographer, and the thrill and empathy that were evoked by war. This is a great text and thoroughly enjoyed it. Lynsey is an interesting person - her motivations are common place, but her narrative voice is strong and her recollections are vivid. She really did go almost everywhere - some of the most deadly places in the world (she got captured in Libya in 2011).

She reflects a lot on what it means to be an observer, and how one tries to give voice to those who have none, she constantly reflects on her learning and her mistakes and is, I think, a pretty informed person to be writing about the War on Terror and other conflicts. The threads that connect her experiences are romance (and how difficult it is for her), her profession (ups, downs) and motivations.

I really enjoyed this, and it makes the second memoir I've loved this year largely reflecting on the War on Terror (Every Man in This Village is a Liar was the other one, with a much stronger focus on foreign policy).

Highly recommended.

Have a look at Whisky Tango Foxtrot by Ashley Gilbertson lite on the text but the images are remarkable.
post #2574 of 3275

So expensive - if you've got a copy I'll buy it!

post #2575 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

So expensive - if you've got a copy I'll buy it!

Ha Ha nice try. Did you try the public library of book depository? or even a second hand one on Amazon?
post #2576 of 3275

Definitely the former. $41

 

I've found it hit and miss with who ships to Auslandia from Amazon.

post #2577 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

So expensive - if you've got a copy I'll buy it!
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

Definitely the former. $41

I've found it hit and miss with who ships to Auslandia from Amazon.

Book Depository has it for $43 shipped. They are ultra-reliable in my experience
post #2578 of 3275
31 Satin Island By Tom McCarthy
post #2579 of 3275
OH SHIT DUDE HOW WAS THAT?

Remainder is like in my top 5 of the last fifteen years (if I was nerdy enough to rank such things shog[1].gif )
post #2580 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob in 89 View Post

OH SHIT DUDE HOW WAS THAT?

Remainder is like in my top 5 of the last fifteen years (if I was nerdy enough to rank such things shog[1].gif )

Third of the way through enjoying it, like the ideas and concepts. I have to ask what is the fascination with Post Modernism I though it was dead and buried?

Read C thats good.
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