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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 162

post #2416 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists

2. Acceptance

3. Shipbreaker

4. Winter's Bone

5. Dhmara Bums

6. Istanbul

7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan

8. Holy Bible

9. The Boat

10. Collected Stories

10. Collected Stories

Peter Carey's collected works are, if anything, inconsistent. Several of the stories were fantastic - evocative, beautiful, sharp, interesting. The majority were, however, meandering, pointless, oddly written (mini chapters within a short story makes little sense, especially for stories a page and a half long).

Not bad.

Was this the same as The Fat Man In History, or something else?
post #2417 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Was this the same as The Fat Man In History, or something else?

Have good feedback on the new novel have it on the reading list for the year.
post #2418 of 3274
I used to be a Carey completist, but I’ve gone off him recently. Parrot and Olivier aside, none of his recent stuff impressed me much, and His Illegal Self was just awful. I’ve been avoiding Amnesia, as a result.
post #2419 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

I used to be a Carey completist, but I’ve gone off him recently. Parrot and Olivier aside, none of his recent stuff impressed me much, and His Illegal Self was just awful. I’ve been avoiding Amnesia, as a result.

I enjoyed my Life as a Fake and The Chemistry of Tears, Parrot and Oliver I tried to read but could not get into it.
post #2420 of 3274
Chemistry of Tears was OK, but I thought it suffered from being part of a bit of a bandwagon going on then with stories about automata; it came across as less original as a result.

My Life As a Fake goes back about 10 years now, so I don’t include that when I talk of his recent work.
post #2421 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


Was this the same as The Fat Man In History, or something else?

 

I think it's different - if you'd like I can go back and name the stories I liked, but the book literally just says 'Collected Stories'.

 

List (Click to show)
1. A Wrong Turn at the Office on Unmade Lists
2. Acceptance
3. Shipbreaker
4. Winter's Bone
5. Dhmara Bums
6. Istanbul
7. On the Trail of Genghis Khan
8. Holy Bible
9. The Boat
10. Collected Stories
11. Lost and Found

 

11. Lost and Found

 

CD covered this pretty well - I felt it was a bit annoying. The dialogue (internal/external) is all written in italics and made me want to smack the author, ugh, so obnoxious. The story centres around three characters dealing with loss (lost in the title, woah, subtle!) in various forms: Millie (a child) in a very upfront way, Karl (old) in a fairly internal, but literal way, and Agatha (old) just becoming withdrawn and cruel.

 

I didn't hate this, but didn't like it - it's one of those books that you read the reviewer's snippets on the blurb/front and just think 'really?'

 

CD, this is what I imagine Agatha as the entire time:

post #2422 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

11. Lost and Found

CD covered this pretty well - I felt it was a bit annoying. The dialogue (internal/external) is all written in italics and made me want to smack the author, ugh, so obnoxious. The story centres around three characters dealing with loss (lost in the title, woah, subtle!) in various forms: Millie (a child) in a very upfront way, Karl (old) in a fairly internal, but literal way, and Agatha (old) just becoming withdrawn and cruel.

I didn't hate this, but didn't like it - it's one of those books that you read the reviewer's snippets on the blurb/front and just think 'really?'

CD, this is what I imagine Agatha as the entire time:


That seems about right.

Did you see what I was getting at with the Wes Anderson vibe? I was referring to whacky grotesque characters running around in an improbable plot, but I meant that she was aping Anderson, not living up to him. I hope I didn’t lead you astray.
post #2423 of 3274
Clockwise counting 10/50: William Ryan - The Holy Thief (2010)

Irish author Ryan writes detective novels / thrillers about claustrophobic life in Stalin's 1936 Soviet Union. This is his first book of, so far, four. The protagonist, Moscow police inspector Korolev, is a good man with moral and compassion but always confused about his loyalty to the party, his country and the communist cause. A case with tortured murder victims turns political and Korolev risks getting on the wrong side of NKVD, the secret political police. Decent entertainment, interesting setting. Not essential reading.
post #2424 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


That seems about right.

Did you see what I was getting at with the Wes Anderson vibe? I was referring to whacky grotesque characters running around in an improbable plot, but I meant that she was aping Anderson, not living up to him. I hope I didn’t lead you astray.

 

There were moments where I felt that, yeah, it could be in an Anderson movie - especially the interaction between Millie/the other boy on the train.

 

But, yeah, it didn't really have that sentimentality and quirkiness that Anderson nails.

post #2425 of 3274
45 Fourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson 100 pages in and I am hooked its a brutal ugly, no a very ugly book peopled by characters who make the local bogans pale in comparison.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 2/6/15 at 1:51am
post #2426 of 3274
18. A River in May Edward Wilson 2002

Picked this up on the recommendation of some of the others in the thread, who have already written it up.

Really enjoyed this book.
post #2427 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

18. A River in May Edward Wilson 2002

Picked this up on the recommendation of some of the others in the thread, who have already written it up.

Really enjoyed this book.

I think you will like his spy stories. More straight-forward than Le Carre with some Spy Who Came In From the Cold vibes. Be aware though, Wilson has a left leaning worldview and, I believe, gave up his US citizenship to become an English gentleman.
post #2428 of 3274
I applaud left-leaning worldviews. In fact, I quit posting in Current Events because of mine. smile.gif
post #2429 of 3274
I thought so. I think the other Wilson books will interest you.
post #2430 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

I applaud left-leaning worldviews. In fact, I quit posting in Current Events because of mine. smile.gif

Me too - and I’m not a left-winger. I’ve worked in the banking industry for decades, hardly a red-ragging socialist, but those guys are something else.
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