or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 151

post #2251 of 3275
Reading a Hannu Rajanaiemi SF called The Quantum Thief. Thought it was no good until halfway when I started to get hooked. After this I will read next in my line of Simenon's Maigret novels or another Yashunari Kawabata or the bestselling Japanese thriller The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino.

Hope Steve B will reread War and Peace or start on Marcel Proust.
post #2252 of 3275
106. Moneyball Michael Lewis 2004

Baseball economics as seen through the eyes of Billy Beane and the Oakland A's. The book was a huge best seller because of the controversy it caused challenging conventional baseball wisdom. Billy's still doing it, and the A's are still winning.

I love baseball, played when I was younger, collected baseball cards, and now play Fantasy Baseball with reckless abandon (at least 4 teams a year). So I loved the book; but if you don't care for baseball you won't like it.
post #2253 of 3275
Clockwise counting 107/50: Hannu Rajaniemi - The Quantum Thief (2010)

Written by a Finnish mathematician living in Scotland. This is a difficult one to understand and follow. The first half you just have to accept on good faith, then the story gets more accessible and resembles an old-fashioned heist story.

The author is a big fan of the French gentleman thief Arsene Lupin and this story is about theft on a grand scale, on Mars, in what is supposedly a post-human world. The end is very strange. I liked this book from around page 150 to 300. I didn't like the first half and I didn't like the final 30 pages. I have seldom read a book with such abrupt alterations.

It seems it got some award for best SF novel of 2010 and good reviews by The Guardian, Financial Times and others. It's mysterious and obscure, partly very well written and exciting but partly like the feverish dreams of an intoxicated Finnish mathematician. It's either awful or brilliant, I am really not sure. Definitely not my style but I may still make an attempt to read the second book in what is already a trilogy. And the second is supposed to be even more inaccessible. Sigh.
post #2254 of 3275
I read the Quantum Theif when it was first released there was a lot of hye surrounding it at the time. Reviews made mention of the fact that the author was a Finish mathematician and that was part of the alure of the book. I read a review of it on the Gurardian and a couple of other SF Book sites. I remember I did enjoy it and so did Mrs GF.

If you haven't read any Jeff Noon have a look at him a British SF writer but I think was also placed into the genre of the New Weird, dont know if that is still operational.The first four books were very good but then I read Falling out of Cars and found it so depressing I gave up on him.
post #2255 of 3275
Clockwise counting 108/50: Keigo Higashino - The Devotion of Suspect X (2005)

This page-turner is a brilliant murder mystery with a spectacular twist at the end. A single mother with a daughter is visited by a stalking ex-husband and things turn nasty. The novel turns out as a battle of wits between a genius mathematician and a genius physicist. Quite unusual and highly recommended.
post #2256 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

Clockwise counting 108/50: Keigo Higashino - The Devotion of Suspect X (2005)

This page-turner is a brilliant murder mystery with a spectacular twist at the end. A single mother with a daughter is visited by a stalking ex-husband and things turn nasty. The novel turns out as a battle of wits between a genius mathematician and a genius physicist. Quite unusual and highly recommended.

You ever read OUT by Natsuo Kirino? A Japanese murder mystery with some very bent twists read it years ago found it very disturbing but highly entertaining.
post #2257 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

You ever read OUT by Natsuo Kirino? A Japanese murder mystery with some very bent twists read it years ago found it very disturbing but highly entertaining.

Interesting, it's somewhere on a bookshelf at home. I bought it in an English language bookstore in Tokyo last year but for whatever reason never got around to read it. I will search for it after I return home from the long business trip I am currently enjoying. Now reading an excellent Kawabata short story collection.
post #2258 of 3275
107. Riders of the Purple Sage 1912 Zane Grey

Bad Guys (real bad- oppressive conniving Mormons doing evil in the name of God). Good guys- two guys get their girls in this one (they are the Riders of the Purple Sage).

The book is much more complex than the (many) other Westerns I've read. The prose describing the setting along the Utah/Arizona border makes you feel you're actually there. The four principal characters are more fully developed than in the other Westerns I've read.

Highly recommended- the best Western I've read by a wide margin,
post #2259 of 3275
Clockwise counting 109/50: Yasunari Kawabata - The Dancing Girl of Izu and other stories (1926-1930s)

The book is divided into two parts, slightly longer short stories in part one and very short so-called palm-of-hand stories in the second part. These are Kawabata's earliest work, including a diary from when he was 14 years old and with his own comments from when he was 25. The title story is excellent and has many similarities with his later and more famous works such as Snow Country or Thousand Cranes. I really enjoy all of Kawabata's writing and find his production to be of exceptionally even and highly artistic standard.
post #2260 of 3275
75 TIGERMAN by Nick Harkaway an entertaining and enjoyable read combing elements of environmental politics, evil opportunist politics, platonic love and play in the superhero genre. As far as consigning it to a specific genre i wonder about it. Its not realist or even SiFi so Fabulism with out the magic realist elements i guess.
post #2261 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

107. Riders of the Purple Sage 1912 Zane Grey

Bad Guys (real bad- oppressive conniving Mormons doing evil in the name of God). Good guys- two guys get their girls in this one (they are the Riders of the Purple Sage).

The book is much more complex than the (many) other Westerns I've read. The prose describing the setting along the Utah/Arizona border makes you feel you're actually there. The four principal characters are more fully developed than in the other Westerns I've read.

Highly recommended- the best Western I've read by a wide margin,

I’m amazed that you’ve never got around to reading that one before Steve.
post #2262 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

75 TIGERMAN by Nick Harkaway an entertaining and enjoyable read combing elements of environmental politics, evil opportunist politics, platonic love and play in the superhero genre. As far as consigning it to a specific genre i wonder about it. Its not realist or even SiFi so Fabulism with out the magic realist elements i guess.

Tick. Onto my wish list. Sounds great.

Has anyone read Angelmaker? How does that one stack up?
post #2263 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Tick. Onto my wish list. Sounds great.

Has anyone read Angelmaker? How does that one stack up?

Read it when it came out throughly enjoyed it. Highly recommended.
post #2264 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

I’m amazed that you’ve never got around to reading that one before Steve.

It wasn't in my Dad's stash. Once I got into Westerns it was an obvious choice.

Are there any others anyone can recommend by authors other than L'Amour or Elmore Leonard?
post #2265 of 3275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

It wasn't in my Dad's stash. Once I got into Westerns it was an obvious choice.

Are there any others anyone can recommend by authors other than L'Amour or Elmore Leonard?

I think the detective writer Robert B. Parker tried his hand at some westerns as well. The film Appaloosa was based on one of his. Shane and The Ox-Bow Incident are both excellent. I haven’t read Max Brand, but he’s supposed to be good.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment, Culture, and Sports › 2016 50 Book Challenge