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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 150

post #2236 of 3286
53. Euphoria

EuphoriaEuphoria by Lily King

My rating: 4 of 5 stars




The Euphoria in this book's title refers to the thrill an anthropoligist feels after being immersed in a foreign culture for a while, when you start to feel that you understand it - often mistakenly. In this book, that delusion is also applicable at a more personal level.

Lily King's novel, loosely based on Margaret Mead, is about three anthopologists who meet up in New Guinea. Nell Stone and Schuyler Fenwick (Fen) are a married couple, of whom Nell is far more renowned. This leads to some resentment from her husband. Andy Bankson is an English researcher whom they join forces with.

The three of them see the New Guinean society they are researching through very different eyes, and this creates further tension and competitiveness between them.

The book is mostly narrated by Bankson, who is the outsider in the group. This serves as an analog for the outsider nature of what the researchers are trying to do in New Guinea. Can Bankson ever truly understand what is going on in their relationships, or is this just the euphoria of a delusion?

King has written a compelling novel that brings the New Guinea of the 1930s to life, along with the excitement and challenges of being at the forefront of a new realm of scientific research. Some of the characters and storylines remain underdeveloped, but this is still an excellent read.




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post #2237 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Anyone have reading material on their Xmas agenda?

I usually get given books or chocolate/biscuits/alcohol. I prefer books, because there rest is not ideal for a diabetic. sarcasm.gif

I’m reading The Siege at the moment, as well as the Amazon Book of the Year, Everything I Never Told You. On my wish list would be:
  • The Bush, Don Watson
  • The Paying Guests, Sarah Waters
  • Reykjavik Nights, Arnaldur Indridason
  • Another Time, Another Life, Leif Persson
  • The Lives of Others, Neil Mukerjee
  • The incorrigible Optimist’s Club, Jean-Michel Guenassia
  • Plenty and Plenty More, Yotam Ottolenghi.
post #2238 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

I usually get given books or chocolate/biscuits/alcohol. I prefer books, because there rest is not ideal for a diabetic. sarcasm.gif

I’m reading The Siege at the moment, as well as the Amazon Book of the Year, Everything I Never Told You. On my wish list would be:
  • The Bush, Don Watson
  • The Paying Guests, Sarah Waters
  • Reykjavik Nights, Arnaldur Indridason
  • Another Time, Another Life, Leif Persson
  • The Lives of Others, Neil Mukerjee
  • The incorrigible Optimist’s Club, Jean-Michel Guenassia
  • Plenty and Plenty More, Yotam Ottolenghi.

I liked The Paying Guests. I just started to read The Night Watch today.

I basically don't get Christmas presents, so I am playing safe and will order a huge parcel from Amazon. I will also stock up on alcohol, for safety's sake.
post #2239 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Anyone have reading material on their Xmas agenda? I'm requested Napoleon the Great by Andrew Roberts from Mrs GF read some great reviews.

For the coming months as an antidote to a summer of cricket I have The Siege by Arturo Perez-Reverte as my lie on the beach in the sun and read book.

The Children Act by Ian McEwan, the Mrs has been generously passing this around at work, mere!

Fourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson

Call Me Burroughs by Barry Miles this will be the second biography i will have read on Burroughs read Literary Outlaw by Ted Morgan years ago.

Inside the Dream Palace The life and times of New Yorks legendary Chelsea Hotel by Sherill Tippins

Vivid Faces The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland 1890-1923 by R F Foster

When the Lamps Went Out From Home Front to Battle Front Reporting the Great War 1914-1918 Edited by Nigel Fountain

Waiting for Tigerman by Nick Harkaway to arrive in the post if it doesn't arrive in the next couple of days I'll be reading The Black Book by Orhan Pamuk which i picked at Vinnies while dropping some clothes off and I will be reading The Peripheral by Wiliam Gibson which I'm giving to Mrs GF for Xmas but I won't see that till mid January at the earliest.

 

Tonnes of books my Mum will get me (she has access to my bookdepository wishlist).

 

However, a couple of Australian books:

- A wrong turn at the office of unmade lists

- Gardens of Fire

post #2240 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

I liked The Paying Guests. I just started to read The Night Watch today.

I basically don't get Christmas presents, so I am playing safe and will order a huge parcel from Amazon. I will also stock up on alcohol, for safety's sake.


Yes at this time of year its important to stock up on alcohol never can tell when you'll need a medicinal brandy or four.
post #2241 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

Tonnes of books my Mum will get me (she has access to my bookdepository wishlist).

However, a couple of Australian books:
- A wrong turn at the office of unmade lists
- Gardens of Fire

Both of those sound great, especially the latter. Black Saturday is etched deep into my memory, as it was my wife’s 50th birthday. We had about 50 people in the house and it was unspeakable. Many had come from the country or the city fringes, and were quite worried about how to get back. The aftermath was truly awful.
post #2242 of 3286
73 Another Time, Another Life The Story of a Crime by Leif G.W Persson

Noiced this book on dispaly in the local library after sighting it on CD post the other day. Very entertaining translation and a great Scandi Noir read.

74The Locked Room A Martin Beck Novel by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo With this i have read the whole series and highly recomend them can see why critics claim that this is the origin of Scandi Noir.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 11/26/14 at 5:28pm
post #2243 of 3286
105. Sitka 1957 Louis Damn L'Amour

Jean LaBarge migrates from a swamp in PA. to San Francisco, and then to Alaska. He is in the middle of transferring Alaska from Russian to American rule in 1848. In the process he gets the girl, but her husband has to die first.

I don't know how much of this was historically accurate. I have no time for research during the Great Read Out.

Really enjoyed this one.
post #2244 of 3286
List (Click to show)
1. All Tomorrow's Parties
2. Undivided: Part 3
3. High Fidelity
4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World
5. Polysyllabic Spree
6. Armageddon in Retrospect
7. South of the Border, West of the Sun
8. What we talk about when we talk about love
9. Norweigan Wood

10. The Master and Margherita

11. The Fault in Our Stars

12. Of Mice and Men

13.Fade to Black

14. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

15. Watchmen

16. Captains Courageous

17. A Brief History of Time

18. The Trial

19. Wind up Bird Chronicle

20. A Visit from the Goon Squad

21. Neuromancer

22. Count Zero

23. Shadowboxing

24. Hell's Angels

25. Anansi Boys

26. Steelheart

27. A Hero of Our Time

28. Mona Lisa Overdrive

29. The Complete Collection of Flannery O'Connor

30. The Last Blues Dance

31. Gularabulu

32. The Glass Canoe

33. The Lies of Locke Lamora

34. Handmaid's Tale

35. Girt

36. Museum of Innocence

37. Neverwhere

38. The Ghost's Child

39. Picnic at Hanging Rock

40. Submarine

41. Name of the Wind

42. Wise Man's Fear

43. A Million Little Pieces

44. The Promise

45. Father's Day

46. Swan Book

47. Red Seas under Red Skies

48. Republic of Thieves

49. Labyrinths

50. Carpentaria

51. Snow

52. Straw Dogs

53. Wrong about Japan

54. Wish

55. Monkey's Grip

56. The Plains

57. Wild Abandon
58. The colourless Tsukuru Tazaki
59. Homage to Catalonia
60. Oliver Twist
61. Trilobites and other stories
62. The Narrow Road to the Deep North
63. Paddle your own Canoe
64. When Gravity Fails
65. Glow
66. Holy Fire
67. The Outsider
68. Taipei

 

68. Taipei

 

This novel comes from that smug and lonely NYC/East Coast bubble of pretensious hacks who lack any vision, ability, perspective or authority. It is a meandering and dull waste of time that follows Paul (obviously the writer Tao Lin) as he ingests a lot of drugs and awkwardly achieves nothing of consequence. Dialogue focuses around nothing, everyone avoiding making choices, half heartedly agreeing to do drugs, etc. None of the characters are interesting, nothing about their lives are compelling. The writing is so severely lacking in detail, depth, reflection or action as to be possibly a ure for ALL sleeping problems. It's not even interesting enough to be a critique of some modern day lifestyles, trends or reality, it's too insubstantial to offer anything at all.

 

I have no idea why this book garnered any positive feedback or criticism, it is an absolute bore and proffers nothing at all. Any one who enjoyed this would be the sort of person I'd want to avoid.

 

The book is like early Brad Easton Ellis, just without any of the compelling parts, originality, surprises or style.

 

This was worse than the Swan Book (just shorter). If someone gives you this for Christmas consider never seeing them again.

post #2245 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


Both of those sound great, especially the latter. Black Saturday is etched deep into my memory, as it was my wife’s 50th birthday. We had about 50 people in the house and it was unspeakable. Many had come from the country or the city fringes, and were quite worried about how to get back. The aftermath was truly awful.

 

I was tutoring groups of students that day. I remember just lying on a desk at about 1pm unable to even think.

 

A few years later it was the same temperature in the Mallee and I was all 'cmon, no one should have to do this TWICE'

post #2246 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

73 Another Time, Another Life The Story of a Crime by Leif G.W Persson

Noiced this book on dispaly in the local library after sighting it on CD post the other day. Very entertaining translation and a great Scandi Noir read.

74The Locked Room A Martin Beck Novel by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo With this i have read the whole series and highly recomend them can see why critics claim that this is the origin of Scandi Noir.

Glad to hear ATAL is good; I’m looking forward to that. Surprised to see it in the library. Have you read the first book - Between Summer’s Longing and Winter’s End?

I really like the Martin Beck novels as well.
post #2247 of 3286
Clockwise counting 106/50: Sarah Waters - The Night Watch (2006)

Very silly of me to pick a 500-pager in the midst of the great read out but I couldn't resist to start this one on a long flight from Europe to Asia. I was really impressed (and entertained) by Waters' most recent novel The Paying Guests and this one is in many ways similar but, I feel, slightly inferior. I understood the protagonist better in her new book and it had that bit of crime / thriller element which The Night Watch doesn't.

There are four protagonists here and it's all about love and despair in war-time London and the aftermath of the war. The love is predominantly of the lesbian kind and in the one relationship that is straight the man is a bastard. It's an interesting story, very well written, and unusually in reverse chronological order, taking us from 1947 to 1944 and then ending in 1941. It's the middle part, set in the second blitz of 1944, that really produces the drama and excitement. I will place an order for Fingersmith soon.
post #2248 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

68. Taipei

This novel comes from that smug and lonely NYC/East Coast bubble of pretensious hacks who lack any vision, ability, perspective or authority.

I have no idea why this book garnered any positive feedback or criticism, it is an absolute bore and proffers nothing at all. Any one who enjoyed this would be the sort of person I'd want to avoid.

Huh. I thumbed through it briefly and thought, Wow, maybe this is the Tao Lin book I will finally read. The writing seemed smoother, and more mature, than his earlier efforts (also thumbed).

He's sort of the poster boy for one loud segment of indie lit here in the smug and lonely US. It had a lot to do with connections, internet savvy and timing. There's more compelling indie books out there -- most of it strange, but all in the same way -- if you're looking. I'd be willing to work out some sort of exchange where I could find you some non-sucky titles and you, in turn, can explain modern Australian lit vis a vis that one movie starring Noah Taylor? happy.gif

This week: more short stories as I gear up for the big push: Lydia Peele (Mule Killers - rustic, excellent). Some from that guy who wrote Snow Falling On Cedar, which I never read: surprisingly good.
post #2249 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Glad to hear ATAL is good; I’m looking forward to that. Surprised to see it in the library. Have you read the first book - Between Summer’s Longing and Winter’s End?

I really like the Martin Beck novels as well.

I had never heard of Leif G.W Persson before seeing your post quite a find to be honest.

Tigerman by Nick Harkaway arrived in the post yesterday and looking forward to spending the weekend between the covers.
post #2250 of 3286
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post


Huh. I thumbed through it briefly and thought, Wow, maybe this is the Tao Lin book I will finally read. The writing seemed smoother, and more mature, than his earlier efforts (also thumbed).

He's sort of the poster boy for one loud segment of indie lit here in the smug and lonely US. It had a lot to do with connections, internet savvy and timing. There's more compelling indie books out there -- most of it strange, but all in the same way -- if you're looking. I'd be willing to work out some sort of exchange where I could find you some non-sucky titles and you, in turn, can explain modern Australian lit vis a vis that one movie starring Noah Taylor? happy.gif

This week: more short stories as I gear up for the big push: Lydia Peele (Mule Killers - rustic, excellent). Some from that guy who wrote Snow Falling On Cedar, which I never read: surprisingly good

 

What? Red Dog? ;)

 

But I'm happy for you to suggest wicked sick titles of great books.

 

btw - I think CD, GF and I do a pretty good job of reviewing recently released Australian novels, and I'm doing my best to get through some older works.

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