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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 140

post #2086 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

I read most of Mann when I was 21 The Magic Mountain and Dr Faustus are my favourite works of his. Thinking of reading Dr Faustus over January holidays next year.

I didn't read any Thomas Mann yet. Thanks for the tip.
post #2087 of 3288
Patrick Modiano gets the Nobel Prize 2014. Amazing that I discovered him and read 2 of his novels just these last couple of months. I have a 3rd incoming from Amazon any day now. biggrin.gif
post #2088 of 3288
Bit of a fun article here: the most unreadable novels. Any nominations?
post #2089 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

Patrick Modiano gets the Nobel Prize 2014. Amazing that I discovered him and read 2 of his novels just these last couple of months. I have a 3rd incoming from Amazon any day now. biggrin.gif

Guess Murakami will have to wait. I hope you put money on Modiano at Ladbrokes. smile.gif
post #2090 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Guess Murakami will have to wait. I hope you put money on Modiano at Ladbrokes. smile.gif

I am not a betting man. Considering the relatively low odds for such a relatively unknown (outside of France) author indicates that some inside information may have been leaking... just my thought.
Edited by clockwise - 10/9/14 at 6:17am
post #2091 of 3288
Could be. You’re right about his obscurity; not one single book of his in our entire library chain. Out of curiosity I hopped onto Amazon and bought The Search Warrant.
post #2092 of 3288
Klewless title 64/50 by Day of Atonement by David Liss


Any new book by David Liss is a treat. Liss writes historical fiction, mostly set in 17th and 18th century Europe. Those familiar with his previous work will recognize a few of his recurring characters popping up in this book, but there is no requirement to read his other work in order to enjoy this title. The story centers on a young man whose parents ship him out of Portugal to avoid church inquisitors who have been overly zealous in their pursuit of those who they deem objectionable. The remainder of his family is not so fortunate. After passing many years in England, the man vows to seek revenge against the priests who decimated his family, and he returns to his homeland to avenge his parents. The story is fast paced, and provides an interesting view on the interplay of religions during this time period. Liss is an extremely talented storyteller, and this was a fantastic read. Highly Recommended.


Klewless title 65/50 by Sorrow Bound by David Mark


The third installment of the Aector McAvoy series. McAvoy is a lumbering Scotsman who has found himself working the Serious and Organized Crime unit in England. His overly sensitive persona is a bit of a handicap in dealing with the criminal element, and this flaw has characterized the series. These are very dark books, and the author does an excellent job developing McAvoy’s complexity. The relationships he has with his fellow officers as well as his wife make for a welcome added dimension to these books. This title takes the reader into the mind of low level drug dealers attempting to move up the food chain, and the cat and mouse games they play attempting to avoid law enforcement. This is an excellent book, I highly recommend the series. Read in order.


Klewless title 66/50 Sebastian Bergman by Michael Hjorth and Hans Rosenfledt


This was an excellent whodunit. The fatally flawed protagonist whose imperfections are meted out sparingly throughout the book is easy to love/hate. The story centers around a murder mystery and the authors do a fine job of keeping the up pace while offering a guessing game as to the perpetrator of the crime. The end was no surprise, however did offer a bit of a twist. Highly recommended, and I am hoping for a sequel. This book was released in the US with the alternate title “Dark Secrets”.



Klewless title 67/50 Deadline by John Sandford


Sandford is only getting better with age. That "effing Flowers" is a fantastic character to read. A Minnesota freelance cop within the state police, he often finds himself saddled with the odd crimes. As long as Virgil can get himself some fishing in, he is more than happy to deal with whatever crimes come his way. Sandford does a masterful job of weaving separate distinct storylines together for a great read. The 8th in the Virgil Flowers series, this story covers everything from a dognapping ring, to small town embezzlement. This was impossible to put down, and I recommend the series. Not necessary to read in order, but the sidekicks are all from previous works.
post #2093 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by klewless View Post



Klewless title 66/50 Sebastian Bergman by Michael Hjorth and Hans Rosenfledt


This was an excellent whodunit. The fatally flawed protagonist whose imperfections are meted out sparingly throughout the book is easy to love/hate. The story centers around a murder mystery and the authors do a fine job of keeping the up pace while offering a guessing game as to the perpetrator of the crime. The end was no surprise, however did offer a bit of a twist. Highly recommended, and I am hoping for a sequel. This book was released in the US with the alternate title “Dark Secrets”

Agree with you i am half way through the second called The Disciple in Australia and loving it. I would like to see the TV series of this.
post #2094 of 3288
67 The Absent One A Department Q Novel Jussi Adler-Olsen

Second book in the series good procedural cold case Scandi Noir
post #2095 of 3288
List (Click to show)

1. All Tomorrow's Parties
2. Undivided: Part 3
3. High Fidelity
4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World
5. Polysyllabic Spree
6. Armageddon in Retrospect
7. South of the Border, West of the Sun
8. What we talk about when we talk about love
9. Norweigan Wood

10. The Master and Margherita

11. The Fault in Our Stars

12. Of Mice and Men

13.Fade to Black

14. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

15. Watchmen

16. Captains Courageous

17. A Brief History of Time

18. The Trial

19. Wind up Bird Chronicle

20. A Visit from the Goon Squad

21. Neuromancer

22. Count Zero

23. Shadowboxing

24. Hell's Angels

25. Anansi Boys

26. Steelheart

27. A Hero of Our Time

28. Mona Lisa Overdrive

29. The Complete Collection of Flannery O'Connor

30. The Last Blues Dance

31. Gularabulu

32. The Glass Canoe

33. The Lies of Locke Lamora

34. Handmaid's Tale

35. Girt

36. Museum of Innocence

37. Neverwhere

38. The Ghost's Child

39. Picnic at Hanging Rock

40. Submarine

41. Name of the Wind

42. Wise Man's Fear

43. A Million Little Pieces

44. The Promise

45. Father's Day

46. Swan Book

47. Red Seas under Red Skies

48. Republic of Thieves

49. Labyrinths

50. Carpentaria

51. Snow

52. Straw Dogs

53. Wrong about Japan

54. Wish

55. Monkey's Grip

56. The Plains

57. Wild Abandon

58. The colourless Tsukuru Tazaki
59. Homage to Catalonia
60. Oliver Twist

 

60. Oliver Twist

 

With prose that's almost absurdly flamboyant, Dickens tells a story of an orphan boy - who is essentially pure and good - who struggles through a cruel, harsh and ignorant world of Church officials, bullies, criminals and aristocrats. A mostly moral tale, there are some glaring inconsistencies:

- Wealth does seem to equate morality in this tale

- Oliver isn't a character - he spends the entire novel fainting, crying and reacting - everything happens around him - so it's hard to care what happens to him

- The minor characters are pretty vivid and evocative

 

The first time I read this, I really enjoyed it, but I felt the typical Dickens slump this time around - the middle is just SO labourious and dull, and there are so many passages where DIckens is justifying the chapters themselves. Someone needs to print a revised edition where the crap is cut.

post #2096 of 3288
Clockwise counting 85/50: Georges Simenon - The Dancer at the Gai-Moulin (1931)

Simenon introduced Inspector Maigret in 1931 and managed to write 10 Maigret mysteries within that first year. At such a forced production rate, it's not surprising that the quality is a bit uneven. This is a weaker effort in which Simenon has not made much effort to either achieve his typical atmosphere or managed to make much sense of the actual mystery solving.

Maigret investigates a case of a wealthy Greek businessman who has been murdered in Liege, Belgium. Prime suspects are two young boys but Maigret suspects a major conspiracy. He solves the case through unconventional methods (as usual) but the logics of the plot are quite flawed.
post #2097 of 3288
What are Aussies saying about Richard Flanagan? A must-read?
post #2098 of 3288
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

What are Aussies saying about Richard Flanagan? A must-read?

Absolutely. From the reviews I’ve read here, everything Grayling said about that book is true. It’s been on my to-read list since it came out, and I will get onto it now.
post #2099 of 3288
I think its great he won it and agree with Peter Carey that it should be a Commonwealth only affair. However as I had an Uncle who was a guest of the Emperor at Hellfire Pass its a little bit too close to home for comfort I think i'll pass on it.

The ABC has a very good interview with Richard Flanagan on the Late Night Live site.
post #2100 of 3288

I'll read it after I finish my current book - I hope to finish it on the same day CD does.

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