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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 139

post #2071 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

45. Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage

Matt said it all.Still trying to figure out what I’m supposed to do with the free stickers that came with the book.

On my reading list.

Soon time for the 2014 Nobel Prize winner to be announced. Who? I am hoping for Spanish author Javier Marias but this won't happen, just yet.
post #2072 of 3274

CD - send me the stickers, bro.

post #2073 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

45. Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage

Matt said it all.Still trying to figure out what I’m supposed to do with the free stickers that came with the book.

 

I gave them to my six-year-old daughter, and she very happily incorporated them into various pieces of art. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post


Been contemplating whether to read this or not as I have read most of his work but you and Matt has provided the answer on this for me.

 

I enjoyed it, and I think that it's a worthwhile read. 

 

Yes, as Matt pointed out, one of the main story arcs is unresolved at the end of the book, but I must admit that I didn't mind it so much. Yes, the book did feel as though it should be part of a larger story, and I did end up feeling as though there should be something more afterwards, as though this should be the first instalment in a trilogy, or something like that. 

 

However, it was also a relaxing read. It wasn't challenging, nor was it really intriguing (unlike 1Q84, I didn't feel the desire to keep on reading to finish the book so that I could find out what happened because I was intrigued by it), but it was enjoyable. 

 

As Matt said, Tsukuru Tazaki isn't as wrenching as Norwegian Wood, but it felt more like NW than his other books, as it's a "normal" story - there's no metaphysics, no mysterious other worlds, no strange spirits - the characters are simply people, in the contemporary world. 

post #2074 of 3274

It was definitely pleasant.

post #2075 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

I gave them to my six-year-old daughter, and she very happily incorporated them into various pieces of art. 



I enjoyed it, and I think that it's a worthwhile read. 

Yes, as Matt pointed out, one of the main story arcs is unresolved at the end of the book, but I must admit that I didn't mind it so much. Yes, the book did feel as though it should be part of a larger story, and I did end up feeling as though there should be something more afterwards, as though this should be the first instalment in a trilogy, or something like that. 

However, it was also a relaxing read. It wasn't challenging, nor was it really intriguing (unlike 1Q84, I didn't feel the desire to keep on reading to finish the book so that I could find out what happened because I was intrigued by it), but it was enjoyable. 

As Matt said, Tsukuru Tazaki isn't as wrenching as Norwegian Wood, but it felt more like NW than his other books, as it's a "normal" story - there's no metaphysics, no mysterious other worlds, no strange spirits - the characters are simply people, in the contemporary world

JM
I enjoy the metaphysics, if I want to read about real people in the world I can turn to Ian McEwan ever read Saturday wonderful novel.

For me Murakami fills a void in literature and ventures forth where others fear to tread. After all metaphysics is just philosophical bench pressing. Speculation that only really finds its forte in discursive practice and it's good that their is a novelist who can present the logos in written form.
post #2076 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

JM
I enjoy the metaphysics, if I want to read about real people in the world I can turn to Ian McEwan ever read Saturday wonderful novel.

For me Murakami fills a void in literature and ventures forth where others fear to tread. After all metaphysics is just philosophical bench pressing. Speculation that only really finds its forte in discursive practice and it's good that their is a novelist who can present the logos in written form.

I loved Saturday, it's probably my favourite McEwan. One of those books which left a lasting impression.
post #2077 of 3274
Clockwise counting 83/50: Fred Vargas - An Uncertain Place (2008)

I think this is the best Vargas I have read so far and by now I have read most of her very unusual crime novels. This is the second last / latest in the series with Commissaire Adamsberg and it is a pure gothic experience, with the "undead" or the fear of the same at the centre of a mysterious case. It all starts with the exceptionally violent slaughter of a wealthy, widely disliked old man, the case then gradually proves to be a most complicated tangle of unlikely circumstances and evermore violence. A great mystery!
post #2078 of 3274
The Nobel Prize in Literature will be announced on Thursday. Betting site Ladbrokes has the following favourites:
Haruki Murakami and Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o in the lead at 4/1.
Belarusian journalist Svetlana Alexievich third at 6/1.
Then follows Syrian poet Adonis, French novelist Patrick Modiano and Albanian Ismael Kadare at 10/1. I just recently read a couple of Modiano's novels and found them very good.

Some other examples are Philip Roth at 12/1, Joyce Carol Oates at 16/1, Milan Kundera and Thomas Pyncheon at 25/1, Don De Lillo, Margaret Atwood, Antonio Lobe Antunes and Richard Ford at 33/1, Salman Rushdie, Cormac McCarthy, John Le Carre and my favourite Javier Marias at 50/1.
post #2079 of 3274
66 The Disciple The Sebastian Bergman Chronicles Book 2 by Hjorth and Rosenfeldt

Arrived home last night and found it waiting on the doorstep Sebastian Bergman would have to be the most conceited self centred prick I have encountered in literary works for years. That said I find this series to be very well written and an engaging read.

Went to Canberras only decent independent bookstore on Saturday where they were having a sale ended up coming away with my plastic somewhat lighter and wondering where in gods name am i going to put another bookshelf.
post #2080 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Went to Canberras only decent independent bookstore on Saturday where they were having a sale ended up coming away with my plastic somewhat lighter and wondering where in gods name am i going to put another bookshelf.

 

GF, is that Paperchain at Manuka?

 

I went there a couple of years back as I was staying nearby at the Hotel Realm and picked up a few books, including The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen and Lustrum by Robert Harris. They were having a sale then, too, and I had to restrain myself from buying too much as I'd only brought a carry-on bag.

 

It looked like a nice store.

post #2081 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

GF, is that Paperchain at Manuka?

I went there a couple of years back as I was staying nearby at the Hotel Realm and picked up a few books, including The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen and Lustrum by Robert Harris. They were having a sale then, too, and I had to restrain myself from buying too much as I'd only brought a carry-on bag.

It looked like a nice store.

It is indeed JM its quite a pleasant browse and they have a very good selection of recently remaindered books out front very cheaply priced.

I read the other day that Macleay St Bookshoop in Kings Cross has closed its doors, very sad day as its been there for over 50 years. Still have a few tomes I bought there back in the 80's and 90's when I lived in Elizabeth Bay.
post #2082 of 3274
Clockwise counting 84/50: Philipp Meyer - The Son (2013)

At 561 pages, this is the kind of bigger-than-life story that an epic spanning 200 years of Texas history needed to be. It's a beautifully written novel about the creation and moral decline of a wealthy Texas family. We follow three generations of the McCulloughs, from the fascinating 3-year long captivity of Eli by the Comanches, through to his son Peter's wish for a return to humanity and Peter's granddaughter Jeannie's emergence as one of the richest women in the world. It's a violent story in which love and honour is sacrificed for the sake of ruthless ambition. An excellent book!
post #2083 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

Clockwise counting 84/50: Philipp Meyer - The Son (2013)

At 561 pages, this is the kind of bigger-than-life story that an epic spanning 200 years of Texas history needed to be. It's a beautifully written novel about the creation and moral decline of a wealthy Texas family. We follow three generations of the McCulloughs, from the fascinating 3-year long captivity of Eli by the Comanches, through to his son Peter's wish for a return to humanity and Peter's granddaughter Jeannie's emergence as one of the richest women in the world. It's a violent story in which love and honour is sacrificed for the sake of ruthless ambition. An excellent book!

Ever read Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann that is an excellent novel of the life and decline of a German Bourgeois family over four generations.The book won him the Nobel Prize.
post #2084 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

Ever read Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann that is an excellent novel of the life and decline of a German Bourgeois family over four generations.The book won him the Nobel Prize.

That’s one of two Mann works on my reading list; the other is The Magic Mountain. IIRC, there was a TV series of Buddenbrooks made years ago and shown on SBS, to rave reviews.
post #2085 of 3274
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

That’s one of two Mann works on my reading list; the other is The Magic Mountain. IIRC, there was a TV series of Buddenbrooks made years ago and shown on SBS, to rave reviews.

I read most of Mann when I was 21 The Magic Mountain and Dr Faustus are my favourite works of his. Thinking of reading Dr Faustus over January holidays next year.
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