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2016 50 Book Challenge - Page 128

post #1906 of 3282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

5 The Keeper of Lost Causes A Department Q Novel by Jussi Adler-Olsen

While going to see Calvary the other day I noticed a poster advertising this as part of the Scandinavian Film Festival it also noted that it was a NYT bestseller. So being a victim of lure of advertising i found it in the local public library. The film is due for mainstream release in Oz in the coming month.

Thanks for the tip. In case others are looking, it’s worth noting that this was also published under the name “Mercy” and was $2 cheaper on Amazon under that title.
post #1907 of 3282
65. The Reversal Michael Connelly 2010

Unlikely tale of Mickey Haller as a special prosecutor paired with his ex-wife.

Strains credulity

Last of the Lincoln Lawyer books.

C-

NOTE: Bought 40 new Louis L'Amours off E-Bay yesterday.

Have 3 more list books queued into Abe.

I have all these Edgar Rice Burroughs books and am finding them virtually unreadable.

Going for 125 and am a bit behind.
post #1908 of 3282
List (Click to show)
1. All Tomorrow's Parties
2. Undivided: Part 3
3. High Fidelity
4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World
5. Polysyllabic Spree
6. Armageddon in Retrospect
7. South of the Border, West of the Sun
8. What we talk about when we talk about love
9. Norweigan Wood

10. The Master and Margherita

11. The Fault in Our Stars

12. Of Mice and Men

13.Fade to Black

14. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

15. Watchmen

16. Captains Courageous

17. A Brief History of Time

18. The Trial

19. Wind up Bird Chronicle

20. A Visit from the Goon Squad

21. Neuromancer

22. Count Zero

23. Shadowboxing

24. Hell's Angels

25. Anansi Boys

26. Steelheart

27. A Hero of Our Time

28. Mona Lisa Overdrive

29. The Complete Collection of Flannery O'Connor

30. The Last Blues Dance

31. Gularabulu

32. The Glass Canoe

33. The Lies of Locke Lamora

34. Handmaid's Tale

35. Girt

36. Museum of Innocence

37. Neverwhere

38. The Ghost's Child

39. Picnic at Hanging Rock

40. Submarine

41. Name of the Wind

42. Wise Man's Fear

43. A Million Little Pieces

44. The Promise

45. Father's Day

46. Swan Book

 

46. Swan Book

 

Alexis Wright's award nominated book deals with the protagonist Ethyl Oblivia: an Indigenous Australian woman living in 'the swamp' - a cesspool that is regulated by the army and Australia's interventionist policies (all failed). The story is set 100 years in the future: after the ravages of climate change, and decades of failed interventionist policies. The setting is sticky, dank, impoverished and culturally beige.

 

Oblivia has been gang raped as a girl and is, subsequently, complete untalkative - she does not talk. Instead, she relates to only three things: two people (the Hbour Master and a woman who cared for her as a child. Oblivia looks at her life and those around her with a whimsical, but occasionally insightful, and brutally blunt eye. As the book progresses the Prime minister (now President) returns - the first Indigenous PM - Warren Finch, and takes her as his wife. She was promised to his family as part of an arranged marriage - Oblivia then moves to Canberra.

 

The book has two narrators: Oblivia and Warren. I found the sections narrated by Warren very interesting, and those by Oblivia very hard to follow - a lot is implied, overly whimsical (to the point of losing strands in the plot) or literally subversive (again making it hard to follow). A lot of the book is dealing with swans - describing them as Oblivia sees them, as they are the only thing she really cares for. I found this unrewarding.

 

I did not mind this book, but I feel that it was a bit wasted as well. Alexis Wright has an incredibly brutal view of many policies and the divide between Indigenous/non-Indigenous Australians comes through, but the conclusions of that, and the extent of those ideas is not fully realised. I can see why this was nominated for the Miles Franklin award, but I also understand why it didn't win - at the end of the day Alexis' choice of protagonist - passive, disinterested, disengaged, non-present fails to capitualise her voice, vision and power as an author - and thus I think the book is actually a bit of a failure as a reflection of present day.

 

This is a terrible shame as it is clear that Alex Wright may be one of the few authors who can actually straddle the increasingly distant worlds of urban multi-cultural Australia and its seemingly third-world counter-part of Indigenous communities.

post #1909 of 3282
66. Reveries of the Solitary Walker 1789 Jean-Jacques Rousseau

THE LIST

For Rousseau walking is meditation. He reveals his interest in botany and children, but spends most of the book whining about the fact that he is no longer in public favor.

Skip it.

F
post #1910 of 3282
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

List (Click to show)
1. All Tomorrow's Parties

2. Undivided: Part 3

3. High Fidelity

4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World

5. Polysyllabic Spree

6. Armageddon in Retrospect

7. South of the Border, West of the Sun

8. What we talk about when we talk about love

9. Norweigan Wood
10. The Master and Margherita
11. The Fault in Our Stars
12. Of Mice and Men
13.Fade to Black
14. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
15. Watchmen
16. Captains Courageous
17. A Brief History of Time
18. The Trial
19. Wind up Bird Chronicle
20. A Visit from the Goon Squad
21. Neuromancer
22. Count Zero
23. Shadowboxing
24. Hell's Angels
25. Anansi Boys
26. Steelheart
27. A Hero of Our Time
28. Mona Lisa Overdrive
29. The Complete Collection of Flannery O'Connor
30. The Last Blues Dance
31. Gularabulu
32. The Glass Canoe
33. The Lies of Locke Lamora
34. Handmaid's Tale
35. Girt
36. Museum of Innocence
37. Neverwhere
38. The Ghost's Child
39. Picnic at Hanging Rock
40. Submarine
41. Name of the Wind
42. Wise Man's Fear
43. A Million Little Pieces
44. The Promise
45. Father's Day
46. Swan Book

46. Swan Book Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Alexis Wright's award nominated book deals with the protagonist Ethyl Oblivia: an Indigenous Australian woman living in 'the swamp' - a cesspool that is regulated by the army and Australia's interventionist policies (all failed). The story is set 100 years in the future: after the ravages of climate change, and decades of failed interventionist policies. The setting is sticky, dank, impoverished and culturally beige.

Oblivia has been gang raped as a girl and is, subsequently, complete untalkative - she does not talk. Instead, she relates to only three things: two people (the Hbour Master and a woman who cared for her as a child. Oblivia looks at her life and those around her with a whimsical, but occasionally insightful, and brutally blunt eye. As the book progresses the Prime minister (now President) returns - the first Indigenous PM - Warren Finch, and takes her as his wife. She was promised to his family as part of an arranged marriage - Oblivia then moves to Canberra.

The book has two narrators: Oblivia and Warren. I found the sections narrated by Warren very interesting, and those by Oblivia very hard to follow - a lot is implied, overly whimsical (to the point of losing strands in the plot) or literally subversive (again making it hard to follow). A lot of the book is dealing with swans - describing them as Oblivia sees them, as they are the only thing she really cares for. I found this unrewarding.

I did not mind this book, but I feel that it was a bit wasted as well. Alexis Wright has an incredibly brutal view of many policies and the divide between Indigenous/non-Indigenous Australians comes through, but the conclusions of that, and the extent of those ideas is not fully realised. I can see why this was nominated for the Miles Franklin award, but I also understand why it didn't win - at the end of the day Alexis' choice of protagonist - passive, disinterested, disengaged, non-present fails to capitualise her voice, vision and power as an author - and thus I think the book is actually a bit of a failure as a reflection of present day.

This is a terrible shame as it is clear that Alex Wright may be one of the few authors who can actually straddle the increasingly distant worlds of urban multi-cultural Australia and its seemingly third-world counter-part of Indigenous communities.

I happen to be reading that right now Matt. Only about 10% into it; can’t say I’m particularly enjoying it.
post #1911 of 3282

It gets much better when Warren is introduced - much more cognizant and, like, has a plot.

 

I want to start checking all the MF nominees each year, though. Gotta support the local talent.

post #1912 of 3282
Always a good idea, although the MF has lost its appeal for me since they started giving it to foreign writers and writing about overseas.
post #1913 of 3282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

66. Reveries of the Solitary Walker 1789 Jean-Jacques Rousseau


Skip it.

Well damn. lol8[1].gif

This I am sorry to hear. Can you to tell me if he talks about Diderot at all? That might keep it on my list.
post #1914 of 3282
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post

Well damn. lol8[1].gif

This I am sorry to hear. Can you to tell me if he talks about Diderot at all? That might keep it on my list.

Nope- his detractors are legion and unnamed.
post #1915 of 3282
About that rumour that I have stopped reading and diverted my entertainment focus to alcoholic drinks around lose women and pool tables - this is partly totally unfounded.

I have added a few under my belt since last report, just never get around to write those capsule reviews. Have had a tough travel schedule for a couple of weeks and managed to read on planes and in lounges. Will get back to post my reviews any day now.

Good to see that the rest of you are keeping up a steady and strong pace!
post #1916 of 3282
67. Last Stand at Papago Wells 1957 Louis L'Amour

Several parties of travelers in the SO AZ desert meet at a watering hole and are set upon by Indians. The ends are far from tied up and it's just a shitty book.

Even for Louis L'Amour.

F
post #1917 of 3282
4 Finite and Infinite Games A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility by James P. Case

Arrived by post today I read about this in The Game Changer a book on change management. Intriguing concepts be interesting to see how they can be applied.

Read the first 12 sectons of the book last night and then put it by the side of the bed as it is definitely a text one needs to ruminate upon.
Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 7/21/14 at 2:13pm
post #1918 of 3282
List (Click to show)
1. All Tomorrow's Parties
2. Undivided: Part 3
3. High Fidelity
4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World
5. Polysyllabic Spree
6. Armageddon in Retrospect
7. South of the Border, West of the Sun
8. What we talk about when we talk about love
9. Norweigan Wood

10. The Master and Margherita

11. The Fault in Our Stars

12. Of Mice and Men

13.Fade to Black

14. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

15. Watchmen

16. Captains Courageous

17. A Brief History of Time

18. The Trial

19. Wind up Bird Chronicle

20. A Visit from the Goon Squad

21. Neuromancer

22. Count Zero

23. Shadowboxing

24. Hell's Angels

25. Anansi Boys

26. Steelheart

27. A Hero of Our Time

28. Mona Lisa Overdrive

29. The Complete Collection of Flannery O'Connor

30. The Last Blues Dance

31. Gularabulu

32. The Glass Canoe

33. The Lies of Locke Lamora

34. Handmaid's Tale

35. Girt

36. Museum of Innocence

37. Neverwhere

38. The Ghost's Child

39. Picnic at Hanging Rock

40. Submarine

41. Name of the Wind

42. Wise Man's Fear

43. A Million Little Pieces

44. The Promise

45. Father's Day

46. Swan Book

47. Red Seas under Red Skies

47. Red Seas under Red Skies

 

Following on from 'the Lies of Locke Lamora', this book sees Locke and his companion try to pull heist after heist. However, the political situation becomes complex, and they become embroiled in the politics and played between three different powers. This sees them end up at sea, which was actually pretty fun. The beginning of the novel lacked some of the charm of the first, and the dialogue was pretty dull at times, but the non-linear structure of the plot kept it an interesting read. Scott Lynch also gets props for having a world substantially different to that of cliche fantasy.

 

It was fun, but I'm almost at my fantasy quota for the year I think. I'll polish this series off and be done.

post #1919 of 3282
As feared, The Tunnel is breaking me. It's long and it's dense and though it carries in its book-y winds some of the finest (and most labored) prose ever written, it is, alas, quite plot-less, and sometimes a slog, and not something to be taken in lightly after a few hours of gardening in the sun. I'm pretty sure I haven't read it in at least five days.
post #1920 of 3282
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post

As feared, The Tunnel is breaking me. It's long and it's dense and though it carries in its book-y winds some of the finest (and most labored) prose ever written, it is, alas, quite plot-less, and sometimes a slog, and not something to be taken in lightly after a few hours of gardening in the sun. I'm pretty sure I haven't read it in at least five days.

I'm similarly struggling with The Swan Book which is just giving me the irrits now. So much so, that I find myself doing my Management Without Authority course reading instead.
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