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2014 50 Book Challenge - Page 57

post #841 of 2053
43. The President's Daughter- Jack Higgins 1997

I think this is the last of the Dillon books to read. Bummer.

A group of pro Israeli terrorists kidnap the President's secret daughter, They threaten to execute her unless he signs a directive to annhilate three Moslem countries that are threats to Israel, Dillon and co. foil the plot.

Pretty good.
post #842 of 2053
9. She Lover of Death, by Boris Akunin (2009)

In 1900 Moscow is abuzz with a rash of suicides, and rumours that a suicide club is in operation somewhere in the city. The Lovers of Death, a group of misfits under the charismatic leadership of a man named Prospero, meet weekly to discuss which of them will be the next to meet the long-desired embrace of death. Erast Fandorin joins the Lovers of Death in the guise of a Japanese prince and attempts to get to the bottom of it all.

The story is told from the points of view of two of the Lovers: Columbine, an impressionable girl from the country and an unnamed informer who is writing reports for the police. There are the usual twists and turns, although the ending was a little drawn-out and implausible. Akunin's next book in the series is He Lover of Death, which tells the same story from a different point of view, and I'm keen to see where he goes with that.
post #843 of 2053
44. Felicia's Journey 1994 William Trevor

LIST

The story of a young Irish woman's travels to England to find the lad who impregnated her. A couple of major plot twists. One I figured halfway through when I was apathetic about the book. The other at the end. By which I was thoroughly enthralled.

A great read.
post #844 of 2053
Clockwise counting 29/50: Stieg Trenter - Cold Hand (1957)

I am continuing my project of reading old Swedish crime fiction. This story is about a baffling murder of a Swedish industrialist in his home. A sledge hammer with blood and hair from two victims is found on the scene but there is only one body. All Trenter books are entertaining and well written but this one seemed to be a bit rushed. Trenter is better when he spends a lot of effort discovering and describing new parts of Stockholm, various fancy restaurant interiors and lengthy menu choices.

I'll probably try to read all of Trenter's 28 novels and of course also all 10 Sjowall/Wahloo novels. Not necessarily within 2013. 

I am on schedule for >100 this year. smile.gif
post #845 of 2053
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

Clockwise counting 29/50: Stieg Trenter - Cold Hand (1957)

I am continuing my project of reading old Swedish crime fiction. This story is about a baffling murder of a Swedish industrialist in his home. A sledge hammer with blood and hair from two victims is found on the scene but there is only one body. All Trenter books are entertaining and well written but this one seemed to be a bit rushed. Trenter is better when he spends a lot of effort discovering and describing new parts of Stockholm, various fancy restaurant interiors and lengthy menu choices.

I'll probably try to read all of Trenter's 28 novels and of course also all 10 Sjowall/Wahloo novels. Not necessarily within 2013. 

I am on schedule for >100 this year. smile.gif


Awesome!
post #846 of 2053
45. Men in Blue 1988 W.E.B. Griffin

The beginning to a new series about cops. Two murders, related. One is solved and one is hanging in the balance, but that's what they make sequels for, no? The girl moves to Chicago and I don't know if we'll see her again. That's probably for the sequel as well.
post #847 of 2053
Clockwise counting 30/50: Stieg Trenter - The Megaphone (1954)

I have come to realize that all Trenter's mysteries are bizarre murders. A young woman is found drowned and stabbed in her bed, a megaphone painted with lipstick traces is stuck on the top of a tree outside her home. In this story we get to visit rural Italy in search of the victim's history and an answer to the question of who committed the murder and why. Most of it does however take place in Stockholm and amateur detective Harry Friberg eats fabulous food, drinks lots of alcoholic beverages and makes witty conversation with another young lady while slowly unravelling the surprising truth.

I have picked up another pile of Trenter books from an antiquarian book store but may need to read something else for a change now. 
post #848 of 2053
46. Diary of a Bad Year J.M. Coetzee 2007

I know I said I wouldn't read any more Coetzee, but my ordered books didn't come in, and this was on the shelf...I thought it was a LIST book. But it isn't.

The autobiographical story of an aging author writing a treatise on the world as he sees it today. Brilliant insights.

Written above his perception of the beautiful woman he has hired to do his typing.

Written above her perception of the relationship.

All 3 presented on each page.

Unorthodox but excellent.
post #849 of 2053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

46. Diary of a Bad Year J.M. Coetzee 2007

I know I said I wouldn't read any more Coetzee, but my ordered books didn't come in, and this was on the shelf...I thought it was a LIST book. But it isn't.

The autobiographical story of an aging author writing a treatise on the world as he sees it today. Brilliant insights.

Written above his perception of the beautiful woman he has hired to do his typing.

Written above her perception of the relationship.

All 3 presented on each page.

Unorthodox but excellent.

I really liked that one too. You would probably also enjoy his other autobiographical novels. Boyhood, Youth and Summertime. Very unusual writing.
post #850 of 2053
Clockwise counting 31/50: Philip Roth - The Ghost Writer (1979)

I am re-reading Philip Roth's series of novels about an author named Nathan Zuckerman. The Ghost Writer is the first in the series and I remember having liked it a lot when I first read it many years ago. It was maybe even better this second time around. 

Young promising short story writer Zuckerman visits legendary reclusive Jewish writer E.I. Lonoff in search for an intellectual and spiritual father figure. He gets to see a bit of Lonoff the (flawed) man in addition to Lonoff the famous writer. He meets Lonoff's embittered wife Hope and the young mysterious girl Amy Bellette, presumably Lonoff's live-in mistress. Zuckerman imagines that Amy is a surviving Anne Frank and fantasizes about seducing her away from Lonoff. The short novel leaves strong impressions but ends on an inconclusive note. 
post #851 of 2053
Finally starting to pick up my pace a little.

10. The Voice, by N.G. Jones (2011)

Two teenagers are trapped under a building in the wake of a terrorist bombing. They can hear and touch but neither can see the other. Together they get through their ordeal but are separated immediately afterwards. Each of them has fallen in love with the other's voice and the separated lovers embark on a lifelong search for that one voice that saved their lIfe, whom nobody else can replace.

The Voice has an interesting premise, but it is ruined by poor execution. All the lead characters are absurd paragons: successful, talented, intelligent, precocious, noble of motive, pure of heart and physically attractive. Not a character flaw in sight. This book would be a lot more interesting if, for example, the wealthy and gorgeous Ambra had been confronted to learn that the voice she loves is owned by an unexceptional middle-class Dexter, rather than an Oxford-educated heroic Action Man Adonis, whom she probably would have fallen in love with anyway.
post #852 of 2053
47. Slow Man J.M. Coetzee 2005


LIST


Story of a man who loses a leg on the wrong end of a bicycle/auto accident. His feelings about losing the limb and how he never fully adjusts to it, feeling sorry for himself. He falls for his caretaker nurse even though she is happily married. He expresses his feelings and she understandably recoils. But he becomes involved with her family anyway as sort of a godfather figure.

Around halfway through the book a woman author appears. They endure one another- he's not really sure what her motive is and she's a constant irritant. She invites him to move to her home to spend the rest of their lives together in platonic bliss. He declines.

I thought it was a great book. Other than Disgrace I've enjoyed all the other Coetzee books I've read.
post #853 of 2053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

1. The Undivided pt 1

2. The Undivided pt 2

3. No Country for Old Men

4. The Difference Engine

5. Wake in Fright

6. The River of Doubt

7. The Pearl

8. Crytonomicon

9. Shot in the Dark

 

10. Malcolm X - Biography

 

Excellent read. While I found the end of the book a tad preachy, I really enjoyed reading about his life in rural America, then Boston, then NYC, before his time in prison and conversion. I found that certain elements were skimmed over (not a lot was said about his 9 years in prison) and cerain elements given way too much time (his immediate release from prison was really, really lengthy).

 

A great read about an intereting and polarising figure.

 

Gotta try and up the game, only on track for about 40 books at the end of the year, would like 60.

post #854 of 2053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

10. Malcolm X - Biography

Excellent read. While I found the end of the book a tad preachy, I really enjoyed reading about his life in rural America, then Boston, then NYC, before his time in prison and conversion. I found that certain elements were skimmed over (not a lot was said about his 9 years in prison) and cerain elements given way too much time (his immediate release from prison was really, really lengthy).

A great read about an intereting and polarising figure.

Gotta try and up the game, only on track for about 40 books at the end of the year, would like 60.

Matt, we can catch these guys up when winter hits. Right now there are too many distractions due to our superior Aussie lifestyle. :-)
post #855 of 2053
11. Fear and Trembling, by Amelie Nothomb (2001)

Fear and Trembling  is a relatively slight novel about a Western woman who takes a job in a giant Japanese company and tries to cope with the vastly different culture that she encounters there. The book has some funny moments but, really, this is nothing that hasn't been done a great many times before, and a whole lot better.
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