or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › 2014 50 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2014 50 Book Challenge - Page 55

post #811 of 1998
Clockwise counting 23/50: Stieg Trenter - The Puppet for Samarkand (1959)

Another enjoyable read by Swedish mystery writer Trenter. A damaged parcel at the Stockholm main post office is discovered to contain a puppet with human hair, including scalp and blood splatters. Photographer and amateur detective Harry Friberg and a young pretty post clerk get involved in helping the police solve the murder case. 
post #812 of 1998
Are you reading these in Swedish?
post #813 of 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

Steve B is the judge. But I think they should count.

Doesn't it take an awfully long time to listen to a book?

Shouldn't but I never tried.

I've never considered myself the arbiter of this Forum but I definitely think it should count.

Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Amazon says Coelho's The Alchemist runs to 4 hours, if that's any guide.

We should at least stipulate that it must be unabridged, I guess.

I'm surprised. The book is only 200 pgs.
post #814 of 1998
7. The Pedant in the Kitchen , by Julian Barnes (2003)

"Cooking is the transformation of uncertainty (the recipe) into certainty (the dish) via fuss".

Yes, Julian Barnes is a cook after my own heart. Like him, I first tentatively approached cooking as an adult, and have leaned heavily on having the cookbook handy when preparing a meal. Like him, my reach has often exceeded my grasp, with unfortunate results.

This book is a collection of articles by Booker Prize-winner Julian Barnes where he recounts his misadventures in the kitchen, and renders plaudits and brickbats to the cookery writers he has tried to follow. There are plenty of laughs, and even more rueful smiles as one recognises oneself in his efforts.
post #815 of 1998
35. The Alchemist Paulo Coelho 1988

LIST

Much of the New Age Genre writing came from this book as it was written before. Many of the concepts are the same, just named differently- The Law of Attraction, The Power of Now- that sort of thing.

I was already familiar with the concepts, so I didn't find the book very stimulating.
post #816 of 1998
36. Disgrace J.M. Coetzee 1999

LIST

A college professor sleeps with one of his students and he faces sever discipline. When he is summoned before the committee he admits his guilt freely but not in the way they want. He loses his job and pension. His friends shun him. He moves in with jis daughter in the country, and gets settled just in time for a brutal home invasion leaving them scarred for ever.

The book was well written, but it is dark. I don't care for dark. I think I may eschew this particular author for a while.
post #817 of 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post


The book was well written, but it is dark. I don't care for dark. I think I may eschew this particular author for a while.

Given Coetzee's backgound, it's not surprising his novels are dark. Not a lot of light around in contemporary South Africa.

He's moved to Australia now; maybe he'll cheer up a bit.
post #818 of 1998
5. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Max Weber.
Examines the origin of modern, rational, capitalistic enterprise. Advances the thesis that a major contribution to its rise was the doctrine of Calvinism and related protestant sects. In particular the need to follow ones calling pushed adherents into work practices which allowed them to accumulate wealth, rather than enjoying this wealth in the form of luxuries or leisure, which would breed idleness, the accumulated capital was necessarily reinvested.

Also has a great title.
post #819 of 1998
37. Amsterdam Ian McEwan 1998

LIST

Booker Prize- 1998

Tale of 2 old friends who unite at the funeral of a woman who was both of their lovers. One composes music; the other is the editor of a major newspaper. Their friend had a stroke and died a miserable death. The 2 friends make a pact to kill one another if they ever get in the same circumstances.

They keep the pact, but a little early. This also was a little dark as was the last one I read by McEwan. I make take a breather from him as well for a while.

But I'd recommend it if you like that sort of thing.
post #820 of 1998
I like both McEwan and Coetzee and I think McEwan is only light dark and almost always very entertaining. Amsterdam is a very good example. What is your current LIST count, Steve?
post #821 of 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by clockwise View Post

I like both McEwan and Coetzee and I think McEwan is only light dark and almost always very entertaining. Amsterdam is a very good example. What is your current LIST count, Steve?

I guess I will have to get used to them. There are 10 more on THE LIST.

Pity there aren't more by Coelho. I really like him.

110.

Probably 50 behind you.

I'm going for 50 again this year.
post #822 of 1998
I'm at 163 / 1001 on the original 2006 edition.
Only 130 / 1001 on latest 2010 edition.
176 / 1294 on the list of 2006, 2008 and 2010 editions combined.
May see you overtaking me in 2014 unless I start working the list(s) more seriously.
post #823 of 1998
Being the competitive bastard that I am, I would like that.

But I know it won't happen. smile.gif

38. The Outlaws 2010 WEB Griffin

The further adventures of C.G. Castillo, Lt. Col (Ret.)

The Russians have several barrels of a horrendous biological weapon that was supposed to have been destroyed when the US bombed its manufacturing plant. They wish to commit malfeasance and mayhem with them, but are foiled by Col. Castillo and his merry band of outlaws.

Great book.
post #824 of 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

1. The Undivided pt 1

2. The Undivided pt 2

3. No Country for Old Men

4. The Difference Engine

5. Wake in Fright

6. The River of Doubt

7. The Pearl

 

 

8. Cryptonomicon

 

A book that took almost all of February and was worth it. Completely and utterly epic. 1200 pages of WW2/early 90s comparisons, code-breaking, maths, technology, gold digging, treasure hunting, love, religion and death all rolled into some insane Stephenson prose.

 

Felt a bit fatigued at times, but that's ok.

 

Hopefully will be back on track for 60 books by the end of the year again.

post #825 of 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

8. Cryptonomicon

A book that took almost all of February and was worth it. Completely and utterly epic. 1200 pages of WW2/early 90s comparisons, code-breaking, maths, technology, gold digging, treasure hunting, love, religion and death all rolled into some insane Stephenson prose.

Felt a bit fatigued at times, but that's ok.

Hopefully will be back on track for 60 books by the end of the year again.

I read that one a while ago. It was a library loan, so the pressure was on to get through it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › 2014 50 Book Challenge